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Cerakote DIY


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6 replies to this topic

#1 samson7x

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 01:53 AM

I have finished a 1911 build and figured I should just go ahead and apply cerakote to top it off. Why pay someone else to do it when I can say I did it myself, right? I have access to a blaster (no cabinet unfortunately) and will begin gathering materials soon. Can someone talk me through the process? Basically you degrease, blast, degrease, preheat, apply, then bake correct? I was told to use 120 grit aluminum oxide as blast media but brownells sells ex-coarse, coarse, and fine. Which closely mimics the 120 grit? Or do you suggest another source for the media? I will be going with graphite black and want a satin finish. Which ratio of material/hardener should I use?

Thanks for the help. Ill update when I finish this project.

#2 Runco

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 02:25 AM

I used only 120 alum oxide, however I had to do some repeats for some dumb mistakes on my side. Someone suggested using a softer media either walnut or some type of plastic/glass. I found ebay to be the best on pricing for all medias including aluminum oxide. You can adjust the air pressure to tone down the media impact if you are using aluminum oxide. BTW don't worry about the cabinet, do it the red neck way, either use a 5 gallon bucket or used a large cardboard box. The goal is to capture for reuse of media, unless you have money to burn or just don't want to clean up. Do wear the safety stuff, face shield, filter mask, gloves, etc. It was a blast.

If you want a laugh or have insomia, read my post from my 1st gun coating experience earlier this year:

http://www.tngunowne...-in-the-garage/

#3 samson7x

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 02:56 AM

I used only 120 alum oxide, however I had to do some repeats for some dumb mistakes on my side. Someone suggested using a softer media either walnut or some type of plastic/glass. I found ebay to be the best on pricing for all medias including aluminum oxide. You can adjust the air pressure to tone down the media impact if you are using aluminum oxide. BTW don't worry about the cabinet, do it the red neck way, either use a 5 gallon bucket or used a large cardboard box. The goal is to capture for reuse of media, unless you have money to burn or just don't want to clean up. Do wear the safety stuff, face shield, filter mask, gloves, etc. It was a blast.

If you want a laugh or have insomia, read my post from my 1st gun coating experience earlier this year:

http://www.tngunowne...-in-the-garage/


That is a fantastic story...quite the experience you had. I plan on wearing the proper attire and I dont have much money to burn so I'll try the 5 gal bucket trick you suggest. Have you coated anymore guns since then?

#4 Runco

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 03:08 AM

No, but I do have two guns that I have acquired in the past few months that I plan on doing over the holiday break. I have a Colt 1903 and a Ruger Mark I, both are in excellent shape, but no bluing whatsoever. I think I am going nickel on the 1903, and flat black on the Ruger.

#5 Dolomite_supafly

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 03:09 AM

Prep is everything for a quality end result. I have used Gunkote, not Cerakote, dozens of times and has turned out great. Because just like anything else the work you put in prior to applying the finish will determine how well it comes out.


If you have a compressor, even a small one, you can buy small hand held media blasters for less than $15 at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool. If not most automotive shops have blast cabinets and would probably let you use it for either a small fee or free if they think what you are doing is interesting. If all else fails then you can use sand paper to roughen the surface. It is not ideal but it will work.

Use gloves, respirator (not a particle mask) and safety glasses when working with everything. To keep your skin oils off the parts as well as keep potentially harmful stuff off of you, out of your lungs and out of your eyes. When you start boiling the solution go ahead and preheat the oven to the required temp. I normally run it at 200 degrees when I am using Gunkote.

Here is what I do:
Disassemble the parts to be coated as completely as you can
Clean and degrease all the parts the best you can using non-chorinated brake cleaner
Media blast or sand all the parts to be coated (I used medium aluminum oxide from Northern Tool)
Bring a pot of 1/2 gallon distilled water and 1/2 gallon Simple Green to near boil
As the bubbles start to form remove from heat, letting it sit for a minute or so to allow the temp to equalize
Place the parts to be coated in the Simple Green solution and let it sit for about 15 minutes
***Do not breath the steam***
Stir the parts occasionally to help break any oils loose
At the same time start boiling some distilled water and turn your oven on its lowest setting
When it starts to boil remove from heat, letting it sit for a minute or so to allow the temp to equalize
Remove the parts from the Simple Green solution and place in the distilled water for another 15 minutes
***Do not breath the steam***
Remove the parts from the water and place them in the oven long enough for all the water to evaporate
Remove the parts one at a time, not all at the same time, and coat them according to the instructions*


*If you remove them all at the same time and the first ones will be warmer than the last ones causing them to look different

This is the down and dirty way I have done it for the last few years and works great. I have only done handguns and small parts but I have went thru at least 4 cans of Gunkote so far. If you have any quesitons feel free to ask. The prep is going to be the same regardless of the coating used, be it Cerakote, Gunkote, Durakote or even Krylon. Even spary on paints like Krylon are very durable once the proper prep is done and it is baked on.

Dolomite

#6 samson7x

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 03:35 PM

Prep is everything for a quality end result. I have used Gunkote, not Cerakote, dozens of times and has turned out great. Because just like anything else the work you put in prior to applying the finish will determine how well it comes out.


If you have a compressor, even a small one, you can buy small hand held media blasters for less than $15 at Harbor Freight or Northern Tool. If not most automotive shops have blast cabinets and would probably let you use it for either a small fee or free if they think what you are doing is interesting. If all else fails then you can use sand paper to roughen the surface. It is not ideal but it will work.

Use gloves, respirator (not a particle mask) and safety glasses when working with everything. To keep your skin oils off the parts as well as keep potentially harmful stuff off of you, out of your lungs and out of your eyes. When you start boiling the solution go ahead and preheat the oven to the required temp. I normally run it at 200 degrees when I am using Gunkote.

Here is what I do:
Disassemble the parts to be coated as completely as you can
Clean and degrease all the parts the best you can using non-chorinated brake cleaner
Media blast or sand all the parts to be coated (I used medium aluminum oxide from Northern Tool)
Bring a pot of 1/2 gallon distilled water and 1/2 gallon Simple Green to near boil
As the bubbles start to form remove from heat, letting it sit for a minute or so to allow the temp to equalize
Place the parts to be coated in the Simple Green solution and let it sit for about 15 minutes
***Do not breath the steam***
Stir the parts occasionally to help break any oils loose
At the same time start boiling some distilled water and turn your oven on its lowest setting
When it starts to boil remove from heat, letting it sit for a minute or so to allow the temp to equalize
Remove the parts from the Simple Green solution and place in the distilled water for another 15 minutes
***Do not breath the steam***
Remove the parts from the water and place them in the oven long enough for all the water to evaporate
Remove the parts one at a time, not all at the same time, and coat them according to the instructions*


*If you remove them all at the same time and the first ones will be warmer than the last ones causing them to look different

This is the down and dirty way I have done it for the last few years and works great. I have only done handguns and small parts but I have went thru at least 4 cans of Gunkote so far. If you have any quesitons feel free to ask. The prep is going to be the same regardless of the coating used, be it Cerakote, Gunkote, Durakote or even Krylon. Even spary on paints like Krylon are very durable once the proper prep is done and it is baked on.

Dolomite


Thanks for the detailed reply Dolomite...seems like you have helped me on every question Ive asked here. I owe you a beer or something :cheers: .

What advantage does gunkote offer over cerakote? Or why did you choose it? I've always heard that for durability (in the spray finish category), cerakote was the way to go.

#7 Dolomite_supafly

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 01:46 AM

I choose Gunkote because it can be bought in a aerosol can. It is no where near as durable as Cerakote.

You owe me nothing, I am here to help.

Dolomite