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No_0ne

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Everything posted by No_0ne

  1. This guy was probably the absolute master at scamming the scammers. It's a long read, and dates from the days when email was still the primary means of electronic communication, but it still cracks me up reading what he was able to get this "Nigerian" guy to do ... https://419eater.com/html/okorie.htm
  2. I would think some well-placed rifle shots through the cameras would solve this problem ...
  3. He was also one of those exonerated in the Innocence Files database, for the crime he was falsely convicted of in the 80's. After his release, he committed the murder which landed him back in prison ...
  4. Be careful about using a Netflix, or any other TV series as a source for information about what's going on in the criminal justice system. Those shows are designed to inflame your opinion, by showing only what the director wants you to see about these cases. A good example of that was the series "Making a Murderer", that ran a few years back. While it was an entertaining show, and did a great job of leading the viewers to a definite conclusion about the case, it was sorely lacking when it came to presenting the facts of the case in an unbiased light, omitting or glossing over a lot of evidence pointing to Avery's guilt, while concentrating only on the inconsistencies that exist in virtually every investigation ...
  5. Reading a little further about this case, the murder occurred in 2000, the trial in 2003. Garrett entered a guilty plea to involuntary manslaughter to avoid a possible death penalty, was sentenced to 15 years and released in 2011. The TBI information showing a possible link to the the real killer's DNA was provided to the prosecution in 2004, but nobody ever bothered to follow up on it. During Garrett's original interrogation, investigator's lied about finding Garrett's DNA at the crime scene to try to coerce a confession from him ( courts have repeatedly ruled that during interrogations, police are generally under no obligation to tell the truth to potential defendants and are essentially free to lie). After Garrett's release in 2011, it's taken another 10 years for the real killer to finally be charged and arrested, finally leading to Garrett's original conviction being thrown out last year, thus the lawsuit filed recently. I would say he has a pretty good chance of winning this one ...
  6. Much like the early days of fingerprinting, the technology to perform DNA testing existed before such evidence was ruled admissible in court, and before that evidence was considered reliable. I don't know the exact date when this occurred in Tennessee, but the use of DNA evidence as definitively exculpatory is a relatively recent phenomenon ...
  7. You're quite likely going to bump up against that limitation regardless of what type of portable rig you buy - see the earlier post about line of sight vs. "skip" transmissions and the frequencies involved. From what you're describing, I would talk to local fire/ranger/rescue officials and find out what frequencies/bands they routinely monitor, and go with something with that capability. I also wouldn't be surprised if their recommendation is to carry a cell, and perhaps a PLB for extreme emergencies ...
  8. In another life, many years ago, I had fairly extensive experience selling, installing and working on CB radios. At the time, they were a useful tool for what you're describing. I've been out of that market for a very long time, but from the posts of many here it sounds as if 2-way communications over the road has gone to pretty much cellular only. It really doesn't matter which type or band you choose if nobody is actively monitoring anymore. You're best bet is probably to adopt one of many traffic and notification aps made for cellular devices, and dealing with the periodic signal outages these occasionally have. If you're concerned about true emergency operations, location services, etc., check out personal locator beacons as these work quite well and can be activated and heard practically world wide ...
  9. I thought of this thread when I read articles about this kid today. He's on to something that would be far more profitable than primer manufacturing ... https://thenewstack.io/meet-the-college-student-who-makes-his-own-chips/
  10. I take it you're saying you wouldn't recommend State farm then ...
  11. This is the south - after 45 years, you're still the "new guy" ...
  12. And now you have your answer. According to the article, they've already spent $100 million, and that's using an existing facility already set up for manufacturing ammo and components. They have yet to make the first primer there ...
  13. If it's produced by oceanic processes, which seems to be the most likely explanation, then sure. It is possible that oceans from eons ago had either more or less biologic activity which could affect the rate of production, but there's no reason why those processes aren't continuing today, albeit at possibly a different rate. It's also possible that the relative positions of the continental land masses have affected production rates, as it seems that most of the biologic activity which ultimately results in petroleum deposits occurs at or near shorelines, thus movement of continental plates can have a role in determining how much and how fast oil deposits are laid down. While there's no reason why current conditions planet wide should have stopped petroleum formation, it is possible that previous events in earth's geologic history made production more favorable than today, it's also possible that we may be living in a "golden age" of oil formation. Unfortunately the time it takes for oceanic silt deposits to transform into usable oil reserves means that we probably wouldn't recognize that favorability for a very long time, if ever ...
  14. According to the internet, the solution is simple - just run hoses up cow's butts and use the methane generated ...
  15. Sure, just never thought anybody was serious about that moniker as an actual theory of how petroleum is formed ...
  16. I must have missed that theory - as far as I know we've known for ages that petroleum is produced by processes occurring due to the decomposition of ocean-based organisms, mostly microscopic. I've never heard anybody theorize that dinosaurs had anything to do with it ...
  17. No. There have been discussions about "peak oil", the point at which oil extraction peaks and begins declining for several decades. Every time we seem to be getting close to that point, there's a new find, a new technology, or something that increases either our known oil reserves or our ability to extract more from sources already identified (fracking and the extraction of oil from things like the Canadian oil sands are two such examples). As oil prices increase, the viability of extracting oil from less "easy" sources becomes economically feasible and predicted shortages don't occur. It is true that the geological processes that cause petroleum to be formed are continuous, however they're slow and certainly don't produce oil as fast as we pull it from the ground, so it's inevitable that we will someday face permanent shortages, but anybody who claims to know when that date will be is guessing at best ...
  18. Pay really close attention to this statement. I've seen a video of the process and it's almost medieval the way it's done almost entirely by hand. Couple that with the fact that dealing with priming compounds is extremely dangerous, which is why they're handled wet and in explosion proofed rooms and you have a hiring, regulatory and and insurance nightmare. If adding capacity was cheap and easy to do, the ammo manufacturers would have already done it several times over, if for nothing else than meeting their own needs. I doubt you would ever obtain the necessary permits to open a new plant, similar facilities that once manufactured flares and other explosive components have been hounded out of business in many communities, including some right here in Tennessee (to be fair, many of these had truly atrocious safety records, some were well known for routine explosions). Finally, the entire gun, ammo and component business is excessively cyclical, it's "boom or bust" most of the time, which is one of the reasons why companies are hesitant to add more capacity. There's no guarantee that once this extra capacity (and expense) comes online that it won't be left idling once we enter another of the "bust" periods. We're currently in one of the periodic "boom" cycles, but as the old-timers always said, 'this too shall pass" at some point ...
  19. Electric cars were actually quite popular during this era and had many advantages over contemporary gasoline powered vehicles. It's likely that the first powered vehicle used for personal transportation was electric, circa 1880 in France. Thomas Edison was an early proponent of electric cars, and the Detroit Electric was one of the most successful in the teens and twenties - Clara Ford, wife of Henry, used one as her personal car for many years. Eventually gasoline won out over both electric and steam powered cars, but in the early years of automotive history electric cars were in widespread use ... Here's a 1915 Detroit Electric car currently located in a museum ...
  20. Am I reading this right? There were over half a million 50 caliber pistols made last year? Where did they all go, and what are they?
  21. That's a website that needs a serious dose of updating - looks like something out of 1995 or so ...
  22. As much as anything else, it's likely that many of the older, sicker folks who had Covid (or a positive Covid test result) when they died suffered from multiple problems. Statistically, many people who are diabetic, have heart problems, etc. also are overweight, have high blood pressure, problems with cholesterol and other related complicating factors. Thus, the "4 or more" statement ...
  23. Good suggestion. I can recommend double pneumonia as well. During my last bout I lost something like 21 lbs. in 21 days ...
  24. So you're saying that we need to get off our butts, start buying more guns, and pass Kentucky?
  25. Oh, goody! A pissing contest ...

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