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No_0ne

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Everything posted by No_0ne

  1. And again, this is almost always true with cars as well
  2. doesn't make sense to tie up retail space on items you can't get, or replace stock in. From a business perspective, it's better to just get out of that particular category of goods and find something you can actually sell ...
  3. I remember my uncle bringing some of this back and showing us, as well as coins and currency from other Asian nations he had been in while overseas. I was a bit too young to serve in that era, but the pic does bring back memories ...
  4. Full confession: I didn't read either the article nor the comments, but this is not news. I can't imagine this raising anybody's BP, unless they have been hiding under a rock for years ...
  5. “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” ― Socrates
  6. I just have to ask. What is a rock rake? I've always lived in West Tennessee, where we import rocks ...
  7. Yes, and it looks like more will follow before the chip industry catches up ...
  8. I don't think he thinks much of the 915 ...
  9. It's interesting how we have come almost full circle with this argument. I can remember similar arguments being made to lower the drinking age and the age to vote in Federal elections back in the late 60's and early 70's, i.e. if we can send these guys off to Vietnam we ought to give them the right to vote and have a drink. A few years later "safety" concerns led to the drinking age being raised back to 21 for virtually all states, although we have (so far) kept the voting age at 18. I really don't have a strong opinion one way or another, but it is interesting to see how the thought process has evolved over the years ...
  10. Although Bannerman is probably the most well-known "modifier" of older American made Mosin Nagants, many others performed similar work when these were being liquidated by the predecessor of the CMP for $3 each. Some are well done and safe to shoot, others are absolute butcher jobs that should be relegated to parts guns now. In addition, the Austrians rechambered Mosins for their 8mm ammo during WWI, and other countries used these old actions to build other variants, including Poland, China and Japan. My bet is on a 30-06 conversion for the OP's gun, but there are other possibilities as well ...
  11. Yes, and no. The M1917 was basically a P14 Enfield, redesigned for the 30-06 then used in the Springfield 1903's already in production. As Winchester and Remington already had the tooling set up to build P14's for the British, it was cheaper and faster to adapt the Enfield to use the same ammo as the Springfield rifles, rather than set up new lines to build 1903's. Although the P14 used the 303 British ammunition, it was originally designed as a new rifle (the P13), with a new cartridge, namely the .276 Enfield. This new cartridge was to be a more advanced, rimless, bottlenecked design to replace the older 303 then in use, however the advent of WWI and the corresponding need for rifles and ammunition led the Brits to shelve the new cartridge design and utilize the 303 in the new P13 rifles for expediency and logistical concerns. Thus, the P13 was renamed the P14, with the only real difference in the ammunition each was chambered for, and the M1917's were then similarly rechambered to use the 30-06. There are some very minor differences in each configuration (P13, P14 and M1917), mainly due to either variances in measurement systems or to ease manufacture as the rifles went into mass production, but there are as many (or more) variations between the Remington, Winchester and Eddystone M1917 variants as between the US and British guns ...
  12. One possible (likely?) explanation is that Colorado State and the Titans are really, really, bad ...
  13. Almost sounds like a James Michener novel ...
  14. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Era
  15. But, it was on the internet. That means it has to be true, doesn't it ...
  16. And why should the two be mutually exclusive ...
  17. Cows too. Don't forget the cows ... https://www.ucdavis.edu/food/news/making-cattle-more-sustainable
  18. Just wait until your feet swell, you break out in hives and rashes, you have heart attacks and strokes, your penis falls off and your head explodes Erik ...
  19. It's not hard. If you can follow basic directions, run a trencher (or operate a sharpshooter shovel) and do basic plumbing no more complex than gluing and screwing fittings together, you can install sprinklers, especially the types used in the typical suburban yard. I've put several together, albeit on large athletic fields, some of which involved running new water mains, installing multiple valves, timers and sensors, as well as large pressure pumps to operate high pressure systems. Doing a yard might be somewhat labor intensive, depending on how well-equipped one is, but most of the stuff you can beg, borrow, rent or steal to get the job done ...
  20. Depending on how the actual ban is worded, that can be more difficult than it sounds. For example, the original ban on Russian/Soviet made milsurps forbade any country from selling these into the US unless they had been in that country's possession for a minumum of 5 years. Even then certain types of firearms got a permanent ban from importation from anywhere. Storing large quantities of ammunition can be cost prohibitive, especially when these calibers often sell quickly in other parts of the world for cash, no questions asked. The Russian ammo manufacturers won't suffer in the slightest, they will simply market their wares to areas where bans and other pesky intrusions don't effect them, there are many cash and carry markets available for both CommBlock and NATO calibers worldwide. In any case, the actual ban is for renewal of import licenses and won't take effect for a year or more, much can happen in the ensuing interval ...
  21. Besides searching completed auction results on Gunbroker, this site lists current offerings on many types of milsurps and is a pretty good indicator of current market offerings: http://www.georgestragand.com/gunstockmarket/search.html?firearm=1&listings=Both&searchwords=M39&excludewords=91%2F30+M44+M38+%2F35+%2F59&qstitle=Mosin Nagant: Finnish M39
  22. M39's are all over the place price-wise. Most seem to sell for $600-1000 on Gunbroker and other online sites now, depending on condition, rarity and whether you can find 2 or more bidders who are interested. A 43 Sako is one of the most common varieties in the wild. Ones with really nice "tiger-striped" stocks can bring good money, but the typical example runs towards the lower end of the price spectrum. The "force matched bolt" is irrelevant, as all Finnish Mosins are basically parts guns made from a combination of older used Russian/Soviet components and newly manufactured barrels and assorted small parts from Finland. The cracked wrist on the stock hurts it, although you can find replacement M39 stocks expect to pay $150 or so for them. As such, I would be surprised if a knowledgeable buyer offered more than $400 for it. All bets are off if you list it on Gunbroker, buyers there seem to go nuts occasionally ...

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