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noylj

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About noylj

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    Tucson, AZ
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    retired

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  1. Easiest to shoot what you have. You can order as-cast, non-lubed bullets (if you aren't going to cast your own) and save some money you can put to the powder coating. Never tried, but Mineral spirits, turpentine, Simple Green and such will dissolve it--but not quickly. Heat and soak or, maybe, you could tumble (but most wet tumblers could be attacked by the solvents). Heat them up slowly in toaster oven and allow the lube to melt.
  2. >If you use jacketed load data for cast bullets you will be safe. That is if you have a 115 grain cast bullet you can use 115 jacketed load data without issue. The reason is cast bullets do not generate the same pressures as jacketed is because the cast bullets are softer. Where did you get that idea? Look at jacketed vs. lead data and you'll see that, yes, the lead data reaches about the same velocity and the same pressure, but almost always with LESS powder. That seems to imply that pressure is going up faster with the lead bullet than jacketed. Again, if you look at any magazine that compares loads, you'll find that for handguns and rifles at less then 400 yards, there is almost NO correlation between SD and accuracy. You are almost certainly throwing away a lot of very accurate loads by looking ONLY at SD. If you do an external ballistics calculation for the various velocities, BC, and Sec. Density, you'll find that over a normal spread of velocity, the bullets are all following the same trajectory--for handguns, out to at least 50 yards and for rifles out to at least 200 yards.
  3. .32-20 and .32 S&W Long. Only shoot the .32 S&W Long with full wadcutters in target semi-autos and it's only good for about 35 yards, but nice and accurate at 25 yards. Fun little things, but pretty useless.
  4. What exactly will a chrony do? Unless you know how velocity for the SAME load compares between your gun and their test gun, velocity really tells you very little. Any change in any component can have an effect on pressure/velocity--including the lot number of powder used. The two real uses for a chrony are (1) to achieve a specific power factor for action pistol sports and (2) to generate external ballistics for long range shooting. If you are shooting a XXX gn lead core jacketed bullet, then use the data for the same xxx gn lead core jacketed bullet as in the manual. This is why you start at the start load and work up. If you have a plated bullet, the standard has always been to use lead bullet data. I prefer to check several manuals and use the lowest starting load. If you look at the number of bullet manufacturers out there, if you HAD to have specific data for each bullet, reloading would not exist as no test lab can test all bullets. It used to be that manuals had load for "jacketed" bullets and for "lead" bullets and that was all any one needed.
  5. 1) It is the same as HP38, but usually costs more 2) It is the most accurate powder I have found for .45 Auto, with Bullseye, Red Dot, and AA2 being close. 3) It works fine in all handgun cartridges, but obviously won't give the same performance as 2400 and 296/H110 in magnums.
  6. My post woman hates when I get bullet orders in the mail.
  7. It can also be used internally by the manufacturer to identify certain loadings. I have a lot of cases with two cannelures and one with three cannelures. Sometimes you can "guess" that a .38 Spl case was used for wadcutter ammo as the cannelure about 3/4" below the case mouth. In jacketed bullets, a cannelure is for the case mouth to be rolled into for a roll crimp. Lead bullets have crimp grooves you can't miss. Why are "what is this ring" questions suddenly popping up in so many forums?
  8. I found one in the ads on the back of the newsletter that comes with my electricity bill. Found one on Craig's List Found one on eBay Buying a Dillon press new, the best that any dealer can do is throw in some free stuff, as Dillon controls the price of their presses and a dealer who tries to sell under will no longer BE a dealer
  9. The gun is what counts. It they feed and chamber, they are good to go. Using a Lee FCD on a bullet over 0.355" is a good way to swage the bullet down and lose any accuracy. Very BAD choice with lead bullets and over-sized plated bullets. The solution to chambering problems is to determine the cause: Take the barrel out of the gun. Drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber. Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker or other marker. Drop round in barrel and rotate it back-and-forth a few times. Remove and inspect the round: 1) Scratches in the ink on bullet--COL is too long 2) Scratches in the ink on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp 3) Scratches in the ink just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case 4) Scratches in the ink on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit 5) Scratches in the ink on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster. I would hazard a guess #4 is the most likely reason...
  10. YouTube will show several. Ponsness Warren is the best known.
  11. If it works most of the time, it should work all the time. If there is a problem, go to 1.150" and try it. Load a couple of inert dummy rounds at 1.160" and play with your gun(s),incrementally reducing the COL, until YOU find the COL that works 100% in your gun(s). All guns have chambers that vary slightly. COL is NOT based just on the bullet, but the magazine, the feed ramp, and the chamber. Thus, there is no single "optimum" COL that works in all guns even for one specific bullet.
  12. I think your response shows a lack of understanding of what I was trying to write--a failure to communicate on my part, probably. I have no real argument about your comments, except I am not sure where they came from based on referencing my post. >1) Not sure I've seen the same results at least with self cast bullets, purchased ones maybe, because when they advertise.401 you usually get .401. What does this have to do with my post? I was mentioning that when I tested my own cast bullets, sized versus as-cast and hand-lubed, several decades ago, the as-cast were more accurate and I went and got slightly over-size sizing dies for my Lubri-Sizer, then went to pan-lubing and then tumble lubing and never regretted it. I have ordered as-cast bullets just for this reason, but I am now old and don't really care about going to the trouble any more, so I just make sure they are large enough (note: if you get leading with commercial bullets—almost always because they are too hard and use lousy lube—simply very lightly tumble lube in LLA or 45/45/10). >2) Sort of, the plunk test is as good as a gauge but a gauge is an invaluable tool for cases such as the 300 Blk and others which you form yourself. Reference was to worry that while the rounds chambered in the gun just fine, they weren't passing the gage. For me, chambering in the gun is what counts and a case gage is just a tool and the poster was worrying about a non-issue. And I have formed cases for wildcats and NEVER needed or thought about a case gage. The main thing with the plunk test is that most folks don't do the plunk test for chambering problems: Take the barrel out of the gun. Drop rounds in until you find one that won't chamber (I assume you could use the gage for this and find your problem also, but I don't have a gage). Take that round and "paint" the bullet and case black with Magic Marker, Sharpee or other marker. Drop round in barrel (or gage) and rotate it back-and-forth a few times. Remove and inspect the round: 1) Scratches in the ink on bullet--COL is too long 2) Scratches in the ink on edge of the case mouth--insufficient crimp 3) Scratches in the ink just below the case mouth--too much crimp, you're crushing the case 4) Scratches in the ink on case at base of bullet--bullet seated crooked due to insufficient case expansion (not case mouth flare) or improper seating stem fit 5) Scratches in the ink on case just above extractor groove--case bulge not removed during sizing. May need a bulge buster. >3) Many bullets sold are already lubricated, you almost have to request unlubricated ones if you want to do your own. And if you require.402 or .403 just open up a .401 it's easy enough to do: As above, I have done so. As far as I know, ALL lead bullets sold are lubed or coated unless you specifically request as-cast. Also, I haven't watched your video, but I would not open up any sizing die without a lathe and a good machinist. I am not and I don't have, so I wouldn't do it. Since as-cast is the way I went, and tumble lubing works great, I don't have to go to ANY trouble. I suggest you try it and see for yourself. I've at least tried both and did actual testing. YMMV, but that is why testing is so useful.
  13. Cast my own for decades. Currently, I have HOA that would take a dim view of such things and I can't find any free lead and I am retired and not in the best of health, so I BUY all my bullets now. 1) Missouri Bullets: 125gn cast L-SWC $34.50/500 (7 cents/bullet) or coated lead for $37.50/500 (7.5 cents/bullet) 2) Precision Delta: 124gn JHP $89/1000 when you buy 2000 or more (9 cents/bullet). Then, there are my favorite coated bullets: 3) Precision Bullets: 125gn FP coated bullets $225/case of 3500 (6.5 cents/bullet)—VERY accurate—right there with PD JHPs—they are swaged for consistent dimensions and weight and, for me, almost always beat out cast bullets for accuracy out beyond 25 yards . For .45 Auto, I can't beat Zero 200gn swaged L-SWC from Powder Valley $154/2000 (7.7 cents/bullet) or Precision Bullets swaged and coated .45 200gn SWC at $203/case of 2250 (9 cents/bullet) for accuracy for Bullseye shooting (since I am not casting my RCBS 452-201-SWC or H&G #68 any more.
  14. I don't understand the problem folks have with the Hornady measure and PTXs. I set-up the measure in station 4 so there is nothing in the way and I can turn the measure up and down to my heart's content. For 99% of all cartridges (I haven't loaded them all), the adjustment to get full cycle is to turn the die up or down as needed. To adjust the flare, the adjustment is to turn the die up or down. There has always been enough play for me to get both set and not do any thing else. I have no idea how or why you would use the turn-buckle thingy they include. Once it is locked down in the die bushing, I move it to station 2 and, since there are something like 8 positions you can insert the die bushing, I insert it so it doesn't interfere with anything. Why is something that seems so simple to me so complicated for so many? The Dillon has the "advantage" of being able to loosen the measure from the die so you can adjust the die without the measure moving, but I find that adjust that die is worse than the Hornady die, so, for me, it's six of one and half a dozen of the other.
  15. Lee Instruction sheets: READ THEM. Lee doesn't waste words and everything they write is vital. Don't skip anything—read it all.

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