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Bob Wright

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Bob Wright last won the day on October 12

Bob Wright had the most liked content!

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About Bob Wright

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    TGO Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Memphis, Tennessee

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  • Handgun Carry Permit
    Yes
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    No
  • Military
    Yes
  • NRA
    Yes

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  1. If interested...............

    I stopped by my gunsmith's shop today to visit my Colt when I saw a goodly array of handguns. None for my taste, but did see a pristine Colt Officers Model Match .38 with a beautiful (not Colt) walnut case. Also a fine looking (didn't examine) Colt .38 Detective Special nickeled. In the back room was a table full ow Walthers, PPK, PPK/S, P-1 and what not. This Keith Warner Gunsmiths on Kirby Parkway in the Fare Four Center, Germantown. Just thought someone might be interested. Bob Wright
  2. Today being Pearl Harbor Day, there have been some WW II stories. Here's one of mine: There was a War Bond Drive going on in Memphis, this around 1942 or so. Set up in Court Square Park in Memphis, were displays, including a German ME-109 and a Japanese Zero fighter. Along the sidewalk on Main Street was a long olive drab tent, with exhibits inside showing items and the number of $25 bonds it took to purchase them. Distinctly remember an M-1911A1 pistol (Army pistol, to me then.) and its price was three $25.00 bonds. Hot dog! I thought, I had four twenty-five dollar bonds! More than enough to buy me a .45! When the soldier told me it was not for sale, I cried. But not to where he could see me. (I was only about four or five at the time.) Bob Wright
  3. My idea of a varmint gun

    With all due respect, I'm hardheaded, just ask my wife. I want the .32-20! Bob Wright
  4. My idea of a varmint gun

    This is a Colt New Frontier, in .45 Colt: It, to me, is the ultimate Colt Single Action. Medium frame, good adjustable sights, and 7 1/2" barrel. I've seen them in .357 Magnum, but they are rare. And here is a Ruger Three Screw Blackhawk in .357 Magnum: Actually I like Ruger's XR-3RED grip frame better (bite my tongue!) than the Colt grip. This gun is made on the medium frame and is about the same size as the Colt. This is a fine gun but there are still "wants" in my craw. I've long envisioned a 7 1/2" barreled, adjustable sighted .32-20 Single Action revolver, either one of these would do. But for, say groundhogs out to maybe 100 yards or so, wouldn't something like this be dandy? Maybe even coyotes? Bob Wright
  5. My idea of a varmint gun.............

    I went to the range yesterday morning for the first time since my surgery. It has been over seven weeks since I fired a shot. I took this old Super Blackhawk: I've been shooting close up, duelist style; that is standing, one handed, as ranges not over ten yards, and using a six inch stick-on Shoot -N-See target. I had figured a pretty bad outing, for lack of practice for so long. Much to my surprise, I didn't do too badly. Shooting at eight yards, twenty-five rounds went through the black, and left a large jagged hole. Why did I do so well? Well, I did spend considerable time dry firing. This helped keep my muscle tone and my concentration up to par, and I'm sure that dry firing practice did keep me in shape. Bob Wright
  6. A .32-20 Thread.

    To the best of my knowledge, I have never even shot a .32-20, more's the pity. But I have always thought an ideal set-up would be either a mid-frame Three Screw Ruger, or a Colt New Frontier, with 7 1/2" barrel in .32-20. Just seems to me to be the ideal small game/varmint sixgun. Just a tad lighter bullets than the .357 Magnum and at pretty fair velocities. As a matter of interest, the .32-20 revolver at one time was on the verge of being the standard police caliber instead of the .38 Special. Bob Wright
  7. If you had to pick between...

    If that were the only choice I had I'd probably go into a monastery! And I'm not even Catholic! Bob Wright
  8. Does Dry firing work?

    Thank you. The doctor told me I'd been through a lot. I said, "Yeah, but I kept my looks." He said, "Your sense of humor, too." Bob Wright
  9. Does Dry firing work?

    I went to the range yesterday morning for the first time since my surgery. It has been over seven weeks since I fired a shot. I took this old Super Blackhawk: I've been shooting close up, duelist style; that is standing, one handed, as ranges not over ten yards, and using a six inch stick-on Shoot -N-See target. I had figured a pretty bad outing, for lack of practice for so long. Much to my surprise, I didn't do too badly. Shooting at eight yards, twenty-five rounds went through the black, and left a large jagged hole. Why did I do so well? Well, I did spend considerable time dry firing. This helped keep my muscle tone and my concentration up to par, and I'm sure that dry firing practice did keep me in shape. Bob Wright
  10. Guns with sentimental value ~ Part II

    This Ruger Super Blackhawk belonged to my son-in-law, Mike Vick. His dad had bought the gun while he was in the Marine Corps. When Mike got old enough, his Dad gave him the gun. Mike read an article in a gun magazine featuring a 5" Super Blackhawk, written by Lee Jurras. Mike had the barrel cut back to 5" but did not have the gun ported. In July of 1979, Mike was killed in a car wreck, and a couple of weeks after the funeral, my daughter gave the gun to me. For awhile I dressed up the gun with some stag grips from Eagle Grips: But, after a number of years, it needed some improvements, so I sent the gun off to Dave Clements who did considerable work on the gun, and I replaced those stags with rosewood, from Lett Grips: This remains one of my favorite guns, and its round count is just over 17,000 rounds fired through it. Bob Wright
  11. Odometer, of sorts.....................

    For starters, a mild target load: Another factory duplication load: An attention getter: I no longer load the .45 to heavy loads, having a .44 Magnum for that. But of powders, I've found Hodgdon's HP-38 for moderate loads, HS-6 for warmish loads, and H4227 for the heavier loads. All of these have given me good performance in both velocity and accuracy. Bob Wright
  12. I was musing the recently about some handgun bullets from the past, from my recollection. I remember reading much of Elmer Keith's opinions, and that he totally condemned jacketed handgun bullets, preferring cast bullets, mostly of his design. And cast, or as far as factory ammunition was concerned, swaged lead bullets, remained the stand-by for a long time, up until the introduction of the .44 Magnum cartridge in 1955. The .44 ushered in a new era in revolver bullets. Jacketed bullets, full metal jacketed, soft point, and hollow point jacketed bullets had been around for a long time, mostly in the European auto pistol cartridges, such as the .30 Mauser and 7.65mm Luger. And the .38-40 and .44-40 were offered in hollow point bullets, but these actually intended for use in rifles. There was a company that originated about the time the .44 was introduced that offered a line of bullets cast of a zinc based alloy. This company, the Cladaloy Bullet Co. sold bullets by mail through magazine advertising. Their bullets were cast of Zinc, and copper coated. Zinc being roughly half the density of lead were very light in weight. A bullet cast from a mold throwing a.44 caliber bullet of lead weighed 246 grs. while the same mold yielded a 128 gr. zinc based bullet. Those who tested those bullet claimed velocities in a .44 Special hit 1100 ~ 1200 fps. The advantage was high velocities with minimum recoil. So far as I can determine, the company lasted from about 1955 through maybe 1958. The late Jim Harvey developed his Pro-Tex-Bore bullets which were swaged of pure lead but had a zinc washer riveted to the base of the bullet. These bullets ran toward the nominal lead bullet weights. His claim was that the zinc washer prevented any leading of the bore when pushed to high velocities, as his loading data pushed .44 Magnum bullets above the 1400 fps level. Harvey also became a proponent of the half jacketed bullet, using a pure lead core swaged into a copper cup, really sort of an elongated gas check. Speer made and marketed these bullets for many years, still offering one style, I believe, a 225 gr. Half Jacketed bullet. One drawback to these is that if the velocity level falls below a certain point there is the possibility the lead core will separate and leave the jacket stuck in the bore. With the coming of new powders that easily develop 1300 fps or higher, the jacketed bullets having an ogive have become commonplace and now good hunting bullets from Speer, Hornady, Sierra and factory fodder from Remington, Winchester and Federal are available, all of which give good performance in the field. Bob Wright
  13. Ammo brass?

    As a matter of interest, spent primers are brass, too! I save them in a coffee "can" as well as fired .22 cases. You'd be surprised how soon you can accumulate five pounds of spent primers! My last trip to the scrap metal dealer I had ten pounds of primers, twenty pounds of other brass unfit to reload. Even bringing home $20 or $30 dollars from the metal dealer helps in the gun budget! Even had a couple of plumbing parts. I do keep spent primers separate from cartridge cases, just in case there is any question. I'm not getting so much brass now as I'm salvaging split .45 Colt brass to make my .45 Xtra Short. Bob Wright
  14. Many years ago I had the care of two 106mm Recoiless Rifles entrusted to my care. These guns had a record book and each round fired was recorded in those books. So, I decided to do the same, keep a log book for my guns. My first entry was made in 1958, and it now consists of over a one hundred thousand rounds fired, and maybe fifty handguns. So when I give a round count for any gun, I know its accurate and know what I'm talking about. This milestone for my Ruger Blackhawk is for my most-fired revolver: I record the date, rounds fired, type of ammunition, bullet used, and total rounds to date. Often photograph targets with loading data displayed: Bob Wright
  15. Another story from my past.................

    Yes and no. The inmates served as range attendants. But the landfill was further west. And before any angst arises, the inmates were either awaiting trial or were convicted of misdemeanors, mostly DUI, failed to pay traffic fines, behind on child support. No felons were allowed on the range or other work details. If you're thinking of the landfill I think you are, that was near the airport, where FedEx parking is now. Bob Wright

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