Jump to content

 

conn_air7

Tennessee Fly Fishing

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I did a little looking around and couldn't find a thread specifically for fly fishing. I recently took up fly fishing a few months ago and as with most outdoor activities, I have fallen in love. I was hoping to share ideas, pictures, or anything related to fly fishing here. What's hitting for you or even techniques you find effective that someone may not know. I personally fly fish for trout, but the conversation certainly doesn't have to be limited to that.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There have been a thread or two over the years but nothing consistent.  This will do.  I fly fish, let hear about it.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There have been a thread or two over the years but nothing consistent.  This will do.  I fly fish, let hear about it.  
 


Sweet, I look forward to learning a little from everyone.

So far, I would still consider myself a beginner/newbie to the sport. I've been fishing nymphs and streamers, but haven't played around with any dry flies yet. In mid February, I was having a lot of luck with a prince nymph. As of last week, I had great luck on an olive wooly bugger. Keep in mind, when I say good luck, I mean that they are hitting it. However, catching them is a whole different thing.

One thing that I'm already noticing is how many fish I am missing. I have always fished a spinner reel or bait caster, so it's my instinct to "really" set that hook. I understand that with fly fishing a simple "lift of the rod tip" is normally all that is needed, but it's harder than I expected. I still miss the majority of strikes that I receive, so help me out here. I've read that a good way to set the hook is to act as if you were lifting your rod to recast again. It's said to be the quickest way to remove any slack from the line, therefore setting the hook effectively.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, conn_air7 said:

 


Sweet, I look forward to learning a little from everyone.

So far, I would still consider myself a beginner/newbie to the sport. I've been fishing nymphs and streamers, but haven't played around with any dry flies yet. In mid February, I was having a lot of luck with a prince nymph. As of last week, I had great luck on an olive wooly bugger. Keep in mind, when I say good luck, I mean that they are hitting it. However, catching them is a whole different thing.

One thing that I'm already noticing is how many fish I am missing. I have always fished a spinner reel or bait caster, so it's my instinct to "really" set that hook. I understand that with fly fishing a simple "lift of the rod tip" is normally all that is needed, but it's harder than I expected. I still miss the majority of strikes that I receive, so help me out here. I've read that a good way to set the hook is to act as if you were lifting your rod to recast again. It's said to be the quickest way to remove any slack from the line, therefore setting the hook effectively.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

You got it right.  Just raise the rod up like lifting it over your head.  Often trout suck the fly in but when they realize its hard metal they spit it out.  If you pull the line with your non casting hand or pull the rod to the side you'll just assit in pulling the fly out of its mouth.  The upward motion will engage the fly in the fish upper lip or side lip before it can be spit out.  You'll be surprised how many trout you catch that are hooked through the "nose".  Are you using a strike indicator? What body of water are you fishing.  Fly selection can often be about where you are.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You got it right.  Just raise the rod up like lifting it over your head.  Often trout suck the fly in but when they realize its hard metal they spit it out.  If you pull the line with your non casting hand or pull the rod to the side you'll just assit in pulling the fly out of its mouth.  The upward motion will engage the fly in the fish upper lip or side lip before it can be spit out.  You'll be surprised how many trout you catch that are hooked through the "nose".  Are you using a strike indicator? What body of water are you fishing.  Fly selection can often be about where you are.  


I think my problem is pulling the rod to the side and not up towards the sky. I haven't started fishing with a stroke indicator yet, I've been going by feel at this point. I've thought about a strike indicator, but I haven't been down that road yet. I am fishing a river called the Hiwassee, it's in Reliance, TN. Everything there is very wide open. There are flat water sections, shulls, small wave trains, just about anything you could want.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know I've never had any luck catching flies while fishing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I'm familiar with the Hiwassee, good spot for sure.  My recommendation is to use a strike indicator.  Either a small piece of yarn with dry fly dressing or one of the "lighting strike" foam balls (small) are very good.  I'd wager you're missing strikes because there is slack in the leader to fly line and it's just taking too long for you to notice.  There are lots of purists out there that will say you shouldn't use indicators and learn to nymph without one.  There is some good logic here but it can be a frustrating and slow process.  If I'm not catching fish I'm not having fun and will tend to go home.  If you don't want a "bobber" on your fly line then you can do a "dry fly dropper".  My favorite is a big Never-Sink Elk Hair caddis, then tie your nymph or midge off the shank.  This way your indicator can also catch fish.  It can act as an attractor too, where trout will see the surface fly and hit the nymph below.  Another added benefit is you can control the depth of the nymph in the water column.  You generally want it close to the bottom but not always, so and indicator will help suspend the fly at the depth you want. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You know I've never had any luck catching flies while fishing.


You know, I never have any luck catching anything while I'm fishing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, I'm familiar with the Hiwassee, good spot for sure.  My recommendation is to use a strike indicator.  Either a small piece of yarn with dry fly dressing or one of the "lighting strike" foam balls (small) are very good.  I'd wager you're missing strikes because there is slack in the leader to fly line and it's just taking too long for you to notice.  There are lots of purists out there that will say you shouldn't use indicators and learn to nymph without one.  There is some good logic here but it can be a frustrating and slow process.  If I'm not catching fish I'm not having fun and will tend to go home.  If you don't want a "bobber" on your fly line then you can do a "dry fly dropper".  My favorite is a big Never-Sink Elk Hair caddis, then tie your nymph or midge off the shank.  This way your indicator can also catch fish.  It can act as an attractor too, where trout will see the surface fly and hit the nymph below.  Another added benefit is you can control the depth of the nymph in the water column.  You generally want it close to the bottom but not always, so and indicator will help suspend the fly at the depth you want. 


I'm definitely going to start fishing a dropper of some kind. I'm thinking it's time to start experimenting with some dry flies, so maybe I'll tie a dry fly to my tippet and a nymph as my dropper to see what luck I have. I have a buddy who likes to fish a streamer and a nymph as the dropper.

I am gonna try some new techniques when I go fishing on Thursday, I'd like to start perfecting my hook set.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, conn_air7 said:

 


I'm definitely going to start fishing a dropper of some kind. I'm thinking it's time to start experimenting with some dry flies, so maybe I'll tie a dry fly to my tippet and a nymph as my dropper to see what luck I have. I have a buddy who likes to fish a streamer and a nymph as the dropper.

I am gonna try some new techniques when I go fishing on Thursday, I'd like to start perfecting my hook set.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

another note is, I never go to any river without zebra midges size 18,20,22.  All colors black, olive, red, etc.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
another note is, I never go to any river without zebra midges size 18,20,22.  All colors black, olive, red, etc.  


I'll check those out! What about fly sizes? What's the rule of thumb with that? How do you determine what size fly you are going to fish?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Raoul said:

You know I've never had any luck catching flies while fishing.

Go night fishing on Chickamauga in summer....you'll "catch" all you want and have lot's of reminders all over your arms, legs, ankles, etc...... LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Go night fishing on Chickamauga in summer....you'll "catch" all you want and have lot's of reminders all over your arms, legs, ankles, etc...... LOL


Love the chickamagua, that's where our river house is! A lot of good bass fishing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yeah. It's great. Crappie, Bass, Shellcrackers.....it's an awesome fishery for sure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2017 at 5:28 PM, conn_air7 said:

 


I'll check those out! What about fly sizes? What's the rule of thumb with that? How do you determine what size fly you are going to fish?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

 

so for nymphing I always start small.  18,20. if those don't work, change, go smaller, go bigger.  most often smaller is better.  For dry flies use your eyes.  I don't fish dries unless I see bugs coming off.  Then just try to match the size.  Also, it's river-dependent.  Some rivers have some large prince nymphs or scuds others don't.  If you catch a fish you can pump its stomach and see.  Put a tube or turkey baster in their stomach as see what they've been eating.  Check the water edges around rocks and see what bugs you can find.  Lastly, ask,  Some fly-fishers are assholes, and won't tell you but I subscribe to the idea that if we want to maintain the sport we have to teach others to catch fish.  So, first stop is the nearest fly shop to the river, they will for sure give you fly advice (buy some flies as a thank you).  Second, ask anyone near you on the river.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

b001cf35cb54b67cb4698b4673f007e3.jpg

Landed a good brown today. Fly was a little tough to pop out, but a beautiful fish.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to fly fish about 30 years ago. I was fortunate enough to live in Glenwood Springs Colorado back in the early 80's for awhile and fish some of their Gold Medal waters back in the day. I always used a shorter 7.5' fly rod instead of the long ones. It was easier to cast, for me anyway, and I always seemed to get a better hook set. Now I always use ultra light or light weight spinning gear. I just got back actually from getting my Sportsman's license and that is one of the reasons. I plan on hunting a great deal more this year and begin fishing for trout so the Sportsman's was worth it for once. The Hiwassee is a great trout stream for sure and there have been some really nice ones come out of there at times. Another good area for trout is Tellico Plains area.  There's also an awesome museum in TP that has just about every kind of firearm made from way back in history. It's really worth the time to go through it. Nice fish by the way. They are delicious grilled on a charcoal (not gas) grill with a touch of lemon pepper on them while they cook.

Edited by Randall53
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahhhhh fly fishing. I don't post on here too often anymore but I logged in and found this jewel of a thread. I'm obsessed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I used to fly fish about 30 years ago. I was fortunate enough to live in Glenwood Springs Colorado back in the early 80's for awhile and fish some of their Gold Medal waters back in the day. I always used a shorter 7.5' fly rod instead of the long ones. It was easier to cast, for me anyway, and I always seemed to get a better hook set. Now I always use ultra light or light weight spinning gear. I just got back actually from getting my Sportsman's license and that is one of the reasons. I plan on hunting a great deal more this year and begin fishing for trout so the Sportsman's was worth it for once. The Hiwassee is a great trout stream for sure and there have been some really nice ones come out of there at times. Another good area for trout is Tellico Plains area.  There's also an awesome museum in TP that has just about every kind of firearm made from way back in history. It's really worth the time to go through it. Nice fish by the way. They are delicious grilled on a charcoal (not gas) grill with a touch of lemon pepper on them while they cook.


I am very familiar with Tellico Plains, so I know exactly where you are talking about! I haven't done any fly fishing there yet, but quite a bit of kayaking! I would love to get out to Colorado and fish in the next couple of years, that's gotta be amazing. I usually release the browns, but the rainbows end up my stomach. Love some trout!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ahhhhh fly fishing. I don't post on here too often anymore but I logged in and found this jewel of a thread. I'm obsessed. 


Help me keep it going!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You sure have all the right gear to do it with Conner.  What rod and reel are you using?  I used to do quite a bit of fly fishing on the Hiwassee, but its been a few years.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You sure have all the right gear to do it with Conner.  What rod and reel are you using?  I used to do quite a bit of fly fishing on the Hiwassee, but its been a few years.
 


I'm using a Redington Crosswater (9ft 5wt). It's been a good rod for me so far. I plan to upgrade at some point, but for now it's doing the trick.

cdeb15c0692e272d34a9f326bd037eec.jpg

A good buddy of mine landed this one today. Caught it on the Hiwassee, quite a fish for the Hiwassee.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Son in law is into fly fishing and he catches a lot of trout on the Caney river in Carthage. Well, let me rephrase that. He use to love fly fishing a lot. Then I introduced him into bass fishing and my daughter has told me I ruined her husband andshe never gets trout for supper any more. She says he's alway bass fishing and releasing them back in the lake............:cheers:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Help me keep it going!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


He's shady I'd steer clear of him

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


The Fine Print

Tennessee Gun Owners (TNGunOwners.com) is the premier Community and Discussion Forum for gun owners, firearm enthusiasts, sportsmen and Second Amendment proponents in the state of Tennessee and surrounding region.
TNGunOwners.com (TGO) is a presentation of Enthusiast Productions. The TGO state flag logo and the TGO tri-hole "icon" logo are trademarks of Tennessee Gun Owners. The TGO logos and all content presented on this site may not be reproduced in any form without express written permission. The opinions expressed on TGO are those of their authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the site's owners or staff.
Before engaging in any transaction of goods or services on TGO, all parties involved must know and follow the local, state and Federal laws regarding those transactions. TGO makes no claims, guarantees or assurances regarding any such transactions.
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to the following.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines