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Bill5335

Looking for help, my wife wants a revolver

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My wife wants a revolver. Both of us are new to shooting, so we are not familiar with the makes and models available. 

She wants one where there cylinder hinges out, so she can load all rounds at once, using a moon clip or speed loader. 

She has long fingers ( she's six feet tall) so she wants a gun that feels good in her hands. But, she doesn't have strong hands, so lighter weight and low recoil is a plus. (I know lightweight and low recoil may not go together. )  

Caliber, bigger than 22.

Thanks for your help.

 

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Are moon clips or speed loaders her requirement or yours?

There are all kinds of options if you get past that, or maybe even staying with it.  A simple S&W J frame with light .38 loads might fit, or maybe a .32 as mentioned.  

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Lots of people swear by speed strips to reload revolvers. Might be a good option too. 

speed-strips.jpg

+1 on the trying them out at a rental range. Shoot a bunch of different ones. Though finding a .32 to rent might be an issue. I hear it is a good option to bridge the .22 to .38 gap. Is a .22 Mag out of the question?

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If you're both new to shooting I feel compelled to ask why a revolver? What have you and she shot?

 

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28 minutes ago, Raoul said:

If you're both new to shooting I feel compelled to ask why a revolver? What have you and she shot?

 

This is an excellent question. I'll expand the question into have the two of you taken a firearms training class separately or together yet? If not find a training course and take it. Good luck whichever route you take.

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5 hours ago, Raoul said:

If you're both new to shooting I feel compelled to ask why a revolver? What have you and she shot?

 

This is an important question, especially since you mention she doesn't have strong hands. 

Is hand strength a concern as it relates to operating the slide on a semi-auto?

Please bear in mind with a revolver you'll have a trigger pull weight that is much greater than the weight of the handgun itself in the double action mode necessary in a self defense scenario. And physics weigh in here as well...the lighter the gun the greater the perceived recoil impulse. Also managing the heavy double action trigger and maintaining good sight alignment minimizing muzzle movement all the way through requires decent hand grip strength. It's certainly manageable, but proper instruction initially will save you both a bit of aggravation along the way. TNWNGR is spot on on the training recommendation.

Also, are you/she planning to carry or is this primarily for range shooting? I ask because speedloaders are pretty darn bulky. (They are necessarily the size of the cylinder of the revolver). I carry speed strips for my J frame Smith because they are compact, not because they are "speedy" LOL.

I prefer S&W revolvers, but Ruger and Colts have solid reputations. My J frame Smith is a model 640 and I've carried it since 1992... so I may be biased in that regard. ;)

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Bill, there are  words of wisdom in this thread.  I am a woman, and I have gone through a lot of guns trying to find "the one".  Also, in the middle of that I suffered a bad fall where I injured both wrists, so recoil is more of a consideration now than before because I can further damage the weakened joint.

I HIGHLY recommend trying before you buy, and not just revolvers.  Here is my 2 cents on some guns I have tried:

I started out in my younger days with a well broken in older .38 special Ruby revolver with a 4" barrel.  Everyone who tries this gun, loves it.  It is a knockoff of a S&W Model 10, I doubt you would be able to find a Ruby in good condition now.  The double action trigger is smooth and like butter, with single action being equally awesome and accurate at quite a distance.  The drawback: on my 5'4" frame, the gun is about 1" too long for me to find ANY holster to comfortably conceal carry.  This gun kept me safe by my bedside for many years, and also as open carry in the outback of Colorado.  Even with my injured wrists, I can shoot it no problem.

Of all the light weight revolvers I have tried, the Ruger LCRx .38 special +P had the best balance of light (not too light) and smooth double action trigger pull.  I tried most of them, including a Smith Model 60 3" . 357.  Although I have mastered the LCRx quite well and carry it concealed for deep concealment, the gun made some of the damage to my right wrist worst.  I used it at a concealed carry competition where I needed 50 rounds.  I had shot that much with it before, but something was different that day.  I had terrible pain for over a month, it has been 6 months later, and my wrist still has not completely recovered.  I will never use it for competition or any recreational shooting again. And the issue did not gradually come on, it was all of the sudden with no warning.

I just purchased an older S&W Model 19-3 4" .357 revolver.  It is bigger and heavier than the other two.  It is built heavier to handle the powerful .357 cartridge, but if you use the lighter .38 special in it, the heavy frame absorbs the recoil VERY much.  It does not hurt my wrists at all. The double action trigger is like smooth butter, so is single and the gun is very accurate even at a distance.  I absolutely love this revolver, it is my favorite of all my guns.  But, if I decide to conceal carry it, finding the right holster on my smaller frame is going to be a challenge.  In addition, when I wear heavier guns off to one side, sometimes my lower back hurts.

Guns and holsters are very person specific.  What works for you, may not work for your wife and visa versa.

My favorite semi-auto concealed carry gun is a S&W Shield in 9mm.  Make sure you try one before you rule it out.

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Bill does not say she wants to carry it. She knows she wants speed loaders…she may be looking for a target/range gun or a home defense gun. Or she have been watching Julie Golob or Jessie Duff and decided she wants to do that.

A J-frame is an option for carry, but not for a target/range gun. A K-frame or L-frame will be much lower felt recoil than a J-frame when shooting .38’s, excellent home defense weapon, and excellent target/range/competition gun.

Bill we need more info on what she wants to use it for, and if she has ever shot a full size revolver; sounds like maybe she has.

Edited by DaveTN
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Welcome, Bill 5335.  You've come to a good and friendly place where there is much knowledge available. 

Many people recommend that women begin shooting with revolvers, but I am not convinced this is the best plan.  Semiautos have advantages in some areas, particularly for concealed carry.  As you and your wife are new to shooting, I agree strongly with the idea that you should get some training and should try out as many guns as possible before you buy.  This will make you much better informed when you are ready to purchase.  You won't know what you like or dislike until you shoot it.

I've been an NRA basic pistol instructor and am now Rangemaster certified, and in my experience there are few people who can't handle a 9mm semiauto unless they have a physical disability (like BHG123 with her wrists).  This is important because any cartridge less powerful than a 9mm is, in my opinion, less than desirable for personal defense.  (There are .380 adherents who will disagree.)  Look carefully at 9mms,  or at .38 Specials if your wife is absolutely sure she must have a revolver (which carries less ammunition and is less concealable than a semiauto.)  The recommendation for a S&W Shield 9mm is excellent, and they are quite affordable right now.

Good luck,

Whisper

Edited by Whisper
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3 minutes ago, DaveTN said:

A J-frame is an option for carry, but not for a target/range gun. A K-frame or L-frame will be much lower felt recoil than a J-frame when shooting .38’s, excellent home defense weapon, and excellent target/range/competition gun.

Agreed.  Note that the S&W 19-3 recommended by BHG123 is a K-frame gun.  There are also K-frame .38s like the S&W 10, 15, 64, and 67.

Cheers,

Whisper

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1 minute ago, Whisper said:

Agreed.  Note that the S&W 19-3 recommended by BHG123 is a K-frame gun.  There are also K-frame .38s like the S&W 10, 15, 64, and 67.

Cheers,

Whisper

Agreed…. But also know that a .357 Mag will also shoot .38’s and are basically the same size and weight of their .38 only counterparts. Adjustable sights will be another factor in determining Model number.

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Ruger LCR it's what your are looking for by your requirements. Caliber is up to you.

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I would not recommend a Ruger LCR. It's light weight makes the recoil a little worser.  I would go for a Smith & Wesson 38 special but even though snub nosed revolvers are marketed for women, they are snappy and unpleasant to shoot and require a lot of practice to shoot accurately.  Also, using a speed loader under duress is next to impossible.  I still carry a speed loader because I will sure try to reload if I must. Smith and Wesson makes some revolvers with 3 and 4 inch barrels but they are expensive. Ruger makes a SP-101 that I would recommend also. 

If you had not asked for a revolver then that opens up a whole new world of possibilities. .380s, 9mm even .45 acps.  M&Ps, XDs, Glocks, Sigs, Walther, Khar, CZs. The Smith and Wesson M&P line and the Walther PPK PPQ line are nice. Ruger makes some nice semi-autos too. The LC380.

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As many have stated I would definitely go to a range and let her try several different pistols and not just revolvers.  My wife was adamant about a revolver just because she had shot them growing up.  Didn't even want to try all the various semi-autos we had.  When we moved to TN we had to take the HCP (Ga didn't require a class).  Two things that were fantastic from that class:  1.  The instructor was a lady and explained things very differently than I would and my wife connected.  2. To qualify we just used their Ruger Mark IIIs.  My wife fell in love with that gun.  Let's just say she now has an assortment of semi-autos.  She carries a Walther mainly because it is very comfortable for her small hands.  But at the moment she is in NC and has a Glock G26.  And sometimes she will carry a S&W 38 revolver.  Let her try many guns and my main advice is to leave her alone in the decision.  Us guys tend to want to tell them what they need.  Just be careful, every gun I bring home is subject to be classified by my wife as "mine".  HAHA.

Enjoy the search.

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I want to add, that for a novice semi-auto user, a Ruger Mark IV is an extremely easy, accurate to shoot gun and a baby can rack the thing!  Try one (rent), and then move up from there.  It is a great semi-auto starting point.

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2 hours ago, BHG123 said:

Bill, there are  words of wisdom in this thread.  I am a woman, and I have gone through a lot of guns trying to find "the one".  Also, in the middle of that I suffered a bad fall where I injured both wrists, so recoil is more of a consideration now than before because I can further damage the weakened joint.

I HIGHLY recommend trying before you buy, and not just revolvers.  Here is my 2 cents on some guns I have tried:

I started out in my younger days with a well broken in older .38 special Ruby revolver with a 4" barrel.  Everyone who tries this gun, loves it.  It is a knockoff of a S&W Model 10, I doubt you would be able to find a Ruby in good condition now.  The double action trigger is smooth and like butter, with single action being equally awesome and accurate at quite a distance.  The drawback: on my 5'4" frame, the gun is about 1" too long for me to find ANY holster to comfortably conceal carry.  This gun kept me safe by my bedside for many years, and also as open carry in the outback of Colorado.  Even with my injured wrists, I can shoot it no problem.

Of all the light weight revolvers I have tried, the Ruger LCRx .38 special +P had the best balance of light (not too light) and smooth double action trigger pull.  I tried most of them, including a Smith Model 60 3" . 357.  Although I have mastered the LCRx quite well and carry it concealed for deep concealment, the gun made some of the damage to my right wrist worst.  I used it at a concealed carry competition where I needed 50 rounds.  I had shot that much with it before, but something was different that day.  I had terrible pain for over a month, it has been 6 months later, and my wrist still has not completely recovered.  I will never use it for competition or any recreational shooting again. And the issue did not gradually come on, it was all of the sudden with no warning.

I just purchased an older S&W Model 19-3 4" .357 revolver.  It is bigger and heavier than the other two.  It is built heavier to handle the powerful .357 cartridge, but if you use the lighter .38 special in it, the heavy frame absorbs the recoil VERY much.  It does not hurt my wrists at all. The double action trigger is like smooth butter, so is single and the gun is very accurate even at a distance.  I absolutely love this revolver, it is my favorite of all my guns.  But, if I decide to conceal carry it, finding the right holster on my smaller frame is going to be a challenge.  In addition, when I wear heavier guns off to one side, sometimes my lower back hurts.

Guns and holsters are very person specific.  What works for you, may not work for your wife and visa versa.

My favorite semi-auto concealed carry gun is a S&W Shield in 9mm.  Make sure you try one before you rule it out.

Very good comments here from BHG123. My wife has some issues with her wrists as well these last few years. Very few things she will even try to hold these days because of the weight and size. She used to shoot a 4" K frame Smith that my Dad gave her, but the weight is just more than she can handle. We've tried several different lightweight revolvers and just cannot handle the recoil. Yes, she has pretty weak wrists from carpal tunnel issues and some old injuries. My Shield is manageable, but she doesn't like it.

After much looking, I found something she will shoot...a Smith 416. Yes, it's a 22, but better than nothing. I bought a Crimson Trace laser for it. It's the grip activation model, so we just leave the unit in the on position and I change the battery in it every year.

We spent a bit of time with it, and have it laser and impact point all dead on at 25 feet. I've told her to just watch the dot and pull the trigger until it's empty. Not the best possible solution, but it seems to work for her.

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7 minutes ago, hipower said:

Very good comments here from BHG123. My wife has some issues with her wrists as well these last few years. Very few things she will even try to hold these days because of the weight and size. She used to shoot a 4" K frame Smith that my Dad gave her, but the weight is just more than she can handle. We've tried several different lightweight revolvers and just cannot handle the recoil. Yes, she has pretty weak wrists from carpal tunnel issues and some old injuries. My Shield is manageable, but she doesn't like it.

After much looking, I found something she will shoot...a Smith 416. Yes, it's a 22, but better than nothing. I bought a Crimson Trace laser for it. It's the grip activation model, so we just leave the unit in the on position and I change the battery in it every year.

We spent a bit of time with it, and have it laser and impact point all dead on at 25 feet. I've told her to just watch the dot and pull the trigger until it's empty. Not the best possible solution, but it seems to work for her.

I think a .22 is a viable options hipower, and it sounds like you guys found a solution to your problem. Good for you guys!

I know most of us feel that a .38 spl or 9mm are the starting point for self defense, but there is a lot to be said for a reliable, smaller caliber handgun that a person can shoot well, and will be willing to practice with.

Claude Werner aka "The Tactical Professor" has a good body of working demonstrating that having a handgun and having the will (and ability) to use it are the most important factors.

Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training wrote a great article a few years back on handgun "stopping power" that yield some surprising results.

"An Alternate Look at Handgun Stopping Power"

http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/an-alternate-look-at-handgun-stopping-power

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Just now, prag said:

I think a .22 is a viable options hipower, and it sounds like you guys found a solution to your problem. Good for you guys!

I know most of us feel that a .38 spl or 9mm are the starting point for self defense, but there is a lot to be said for a reliable, smaller caliber handgun that a person can shoot well, and will be willing to practice with.

Claude Werner aka "The Tactical Professor" has a good body of working demonstrating that having a handgun and having the will (and ability) to use it are the most important factors.

Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training wrote a great article a few years back on handgun "stopping power" that yield some surprising results.

"An Alternate Look at Handgun Stopping Power"

http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/an-alternate-look-at-handgun-stopping-power

Thanks prag. My ultimate goal is to get one of the 22 mag Smiths. (Yes as much for me as her. lol) The 351 PD I believe was the model. They are just a wee bit pricey.

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My wife conceal carries a Ruger LCR in 38 spl and her house gun is a S W Model 65 I purchased used for her. It is a 357 mag/38 spl and she keeps it loaded with 38 spl Cor Bon DPX. It is much heavier and has a 3" brl which makes it easier to shoot well. Good advice for her to go to a range and shoot several different guns before she purchases one. 

If you go the 22 LR way, IMO the 22 magnum is much better and is still lower recoil than the 9MM or 38Spl. You could also look at 380 if she could rack the slide on a pistol.

You guys need to get some serious training, and practice, to become proficient with any firearm. If you arm yourself, get some training.  Might save your life. 

Edited by pop pop

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If you've made a decision to start with a revolver, go for it, I started carrying with one.

For practice, familiarity and home defense, I'd suggest a full(er) sized .357 in lieu of a compact and or lightweight.

I shoot primarily .38 in my .357s, with a +p loading for SD. 

Or perhaps one in 9mm. Harder to find but if you do add a 9mm semi auto, you have ammo compatibility. It's also cheaper to practice with. A 9mm revolver will be cut for moon clips or have a tricky little spring loaded mechanism built into the ejector assembly.

I agree with the opinions a semi auto is a superior choice in a fight. More bullets, faster reloads. Also agree that she go try before you buy. If not shootin', and least see how it fits.

 The term 'combat revolver or combat magnum' would be slick marketing, if it was still 1899.  I know, have one.

I have an SP101 cut for moon clips, cool feature, I never use them, the HKS reloaders work well for me and is my preferred method.

Since do not regularly or routinely carry my revolvers (but have used them extensively in the past) my reloads are smooth and way too slow. With limited practice, not so speedy strips are great for carrying extra ammo and reloading in non critical situations.

New or used Ruger, S&W, and other brand name are all pretty safe bets.

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Lots of great advice here. I'll just emphasize take a basic shooting class and try as many guns as possible before making a decision. 

From my own experience:

My late wife had arthritis in her hands. When it got to the point where she couldn't handle the recoil of her .38 anymore, she found a S&W Model 30 in .32 Long suited her just fine. The recoil didn't hurt her and she shot it very well. Ain't no power house, but it sure beats harsh language. :up:

A lady I know got herself a 2" S&W Model 10 .38 Special. She shot it extremely well, but wouldn't carry it due to its weight. Later she got a S&W 442 airweight. She will carry this one, but doesn't like to shoot it much due to the heavy recoil. The result is she carries the 442 and uses the Model 10 for home defense. Conclusion: go with the gun you will actually carry even if you don't like the recoil. Just practice regularly as much as is comfortable so that if you need it, you can properly use it. 

Another lady I know is a widow and she also suffers from weak hands. She went through her late husband's guns and settled on a Taurus TP-25 because its pop-up barrel makes loading easy and she could shoot it well.  While many berate the lowly .25acp, it still proves that any gun is better than no gun. ;)

Keep your options open. You never know what might work for you. 

 

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A Ruger LCR loaded with 38 S&W is both light weight and lower recoil than even 38 special ammo. You can get the LCRX with a 3 inch barrel and a longer grip than the smaller version. Recoil should be relatively light with the 38 S&W loads.

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29 minutes ago, Tuffus said:

A Ruger LCR loaded with 38 S&W is both light weight and lower recoil than even 38 special ammo. You can get the LCRX with a 3 inch barrel and a longer grip than the smaller version. Recoil should be relatively light with the 38 S&W loads.

I had not thought of trading up to the 3" version of my current LCRx .38 special +P.  I wonder if it would be enough to take the recoil strain of a lightweight revolver off my wrist?

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