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Ran across this one recently and was very pleased with my first range trip with it.

 

Rifle itself is all matching right down to the wood and cleaning rod.

 

Bayonet does not match numbers but was a cool bonus I thought.

 

The target shows my first 10 shots with it. This was only at 50 yards but that is the farthest distance my range offers.

 

Enjoy!

 

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6d851c1b2adf7a9ecb0eb623911c255c.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Were you shooting PPU?


On that outing I was shooting Federal. But I shoot/have shot PPU in other calibers and plan to do so in the future.


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You've got a real un-common rifle there, 6.5 caliber I presume ? Good to see one relatively un-molested .

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You've got a real un-common rifle there, 6.5 caliber I presume ? Good to see one relatively un-molested .


Yes, it is 6.5x55. And it does look to me to be basically in original shape, although I am new enough to these I don’t know that I could spot refurb markings if they even exist.

One of my favorite parts of milsurp collecting is running across old stuff like this and just thinking back about the years and circumstances it has seen!


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3 minutes ago, TNBuckeye said:

One of my favorite parts of milsurp collecting is running across old stuff like this and just thinking back about the years and circumstances it has seen!

That's exactly why I like them. 

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I'm no expert at identifying wood, but it looks lilke a maple or walnut stock. If so, so much the better.

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On 4/6/2018 at 7:33 PM, TNBuckeye said:

Yes, it is 6.5x55. And it does look to me to be basically in original shape, although I am new enough to these I don’t know that I could spot refurb markings if they even exist.

 

Many times the refurb stamps on the Swedes are on the bottom of the stock between the trigger guard and the rear sling swivel.  Usually a series of crowns and maybe letters.  Some crown stamps are original inspection, some are refurb markings.  Would have to see the a photo of them to make a guess.

 

5 hours ago, Swede said:

I'm no expert at identifying wood, but it looks lilke a maple or walnut stock. If so, so much the better.

I'm no expert either, but I'd guess walnut by grain of the wood, although it is rather light in color. According to the book "Crown Jewels, The Mauser in Sweden", until 1915 all original stocks on Swedish M94 carbines & M96 rifles were French walnut. So it would be interesting to see what the markings on the bottom of the stock are.

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I'm no expert either, but I'd guess walnut by grain of the wood, although it is rather light in color. According to the book "Crown Jewels, The Mauser in Sweden", until 1915 all original stocks on Swedish M94 carbines & M96 rifles were French walnut. So it would be interesting to see what the markings on the bottom of the stock are.


The only mark I see on the wood on the bottom is right behind the trigger guard, as pictured here.

Very curious about the type of wood the stock is made from as well...

077e258626040ffd4d191b3b43c78230.jpg

cc3d5d68bbd683455e0e216cb8795f6f.jpg


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The only mark I see on the wood on the bottom is right behind the trigger guard, as pictured here.

Very curious about the type of wood the stock is made from as well...

077e258626040ffd4d191b3b43c78230.jpg

cc3d5d68bbd683455e0e216cb8795f6f.jpg


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Or should I say MARKS???


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Looks like a very faint crown on the right (as your photo is oriented) and more distinct crown on the left. 

The book says the first crown on the wrist of the stock is the initial testing and sighting in. Subsequent crowns indicate re-inspection. Certain workshops had letters associated with additional crown stamps which "usually means the rifle was rebarrelled at a particular arsenal or refurbishing station". 

Also, "the first time a rifle went to an armourer for inspection, a punch mark was often placed on the trigger guard. A second similar mark would often be placed if a minor repair was made." I haven't been able to find punch marks on the trigger guards of the 2 rifles I have.

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Looks like a very faint crown on the right (as your photo is oriented) and more distinct crown on the left. 
The book says the first crown on the wrist of the stock is the initial testing and sighting in. Subsequent crowns indicate re-inspection. Certain workshops had letters associated with additional crown stamps which "usually means the rifle was rebarrelled at a particular arsenal or refurbishing station". 
Also, "the first time a rifle went to an armourer for inspection, a punch mark was often placed on the trigger guard. A second similar mark would often be placed if a minor repair was made." I haven't been able to find punch marks on the trigger guards of the 2 rifles I have.


Interesting! I don’t see punch markings on the trigger guard at all. And to me the wear/bluing loss on the barrel looks consistent with the receiver so I lean toward it being the original barrel but certainly anything is possible.

Regardless I like it a lot!


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3 hours ago, TNBuckeye said:

Interesting! I don’t see punch markings on the trigger guard at all. And to me the wear/bluing loss on the barrel looks consistent with the receiver so I lean toward it being the original barrel but certainly anything is possible.

Regardless I like it a lot!

Further info from the book about replacement barrels:

"If the barrel was replaced, the identifying marking of the arsenal or depot doing the work was stamped on the new barrel.  Spare barrels manufactured in 1955 or later have the last digit of the diameter of the bore stamped close to the muzzle. Rifles which were sighted in with spitzer-bulleted m/41 ammunition were stamped with the height of the front sight post on the left side of the front sight base, and a "T" on the right side of the front sight base."

So maybe look for those markings to get an indication of barrel replacement.

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I have three 1912 Swedish Mausers, an m/96 an FSR m/96 and an m/41 and a total of 13 Swedes. Your stock is french walnut, chances are if the butt plate matches it is the original stock, the one crown stamp is indeed the first inspection before the rifle left Carl Gustafs. Your barrel is rated as a 2 which means some corrosion present in the lands but the Swedes were picky so it is still a fine bore. It was also measured at 6.51mm. which is pretty good. Should prove to be a fine shooter. PPU is decent but handloading with a fairly slow powder makes the Swedes shine.

Mausers II.jpeg

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