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tercel89

Pulling trigger to disassemble "hazzard" ?

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This may have been posted here before , heck I may have posted this before but anyways , I just watched a few of the Mossberg pistol videos and everyone is so happy of how you don't have to pull the trigger to disassemble it.  My question is this : Why the heck are so many people scared to pull the trigger to disassemble an EMPTY gun ? I have never understood this. It' so bad that some people wont buy Glocks and others like them. It isn't rocket science. Just clear the gun and take it apart. But now the new generation has taken over and making newer guns with things to where you don't have to pull that DANGEROUS TRIGGER.  I honestly want to know what the big deal is . Clear the gun and you're good to go . Ok my rant is over .

Edited by tercel89
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People are stupid and you can't fix that. 

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 I think a lot of people are still under the impression that it's harmful to the gun to be dry fired. 

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58 minutes ago, tercel89 said:

Clear the gun and you're good to go .

Yes, exactly. But some people aren't familiar with firearms, and pulling the trigger to dissassemble makes them nervous. Other people are very familiar with firearms, and pulling the trigger to dissassemble doesn't make them nervous enough.

The first group buys something other than a Glock, the second group might eventually put a hole in something which they didn't intend to. Which makes the first group nervous about pulling the trigger to dissassemble...

And I'll second the observation that some people believe dry firing anything is bad.

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45 minutes ago, xsubsailor said:

 I think a lot of people are still under the impression that it's harmful to the gun to be dry fired. 

I believe that to be pretty accurate.

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My take on is that it is drilled into folks head that you don’t pull the trigger until you are ready to shoot as one of the 4 primary safety rules. Then Glock turns around and says “forget all that if you wanna clean our gun” and it just sticks in the craw for some folks. 

My dislike of Glock has nothing to do with disassembly procedures, but that’s my take anyways. 

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Just now, Chucktshoes said:

My take on is that it is drilled into folks head that you don’t pull the trigger until you are ready to shoot as one of the 4 primary safety rules. Then Glock turns around and says “forget all that if you wanna clean our gun” and it just sticks in the craw for some folks. 

My dislike of Glock has nothing to do with disassembly procedures, but that’s my take anyways. 

But we also preach dry fire practice.   

Each of the four rules has an exception.  That's why there are four.   If you break any one of the rules, at worst, its an ND.   Bad stuff doesn't happen until you break two or more simultaneously.  Maybe we aren't doing a good enough job of teaching that aspect to people.  

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Even though I have cleared and checked the chamber multiple times the gun is still pointed to the ground before I pull the trigger.

I also don’t completely trust a decoker. It is always to the ground before using it.  

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2 hours ago, xsubsailor said:

 I think a lot of people are still under the impression that it's harmful to the gun to be dry fired. 

I agree but when the Manufacturer's manual says the trigger needs to be pulled  these people still go nuts ! LOL

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Every manual is pretty clear in what are usually large call-outs that the gun needs to be cleared before cleaning.   If that's not a deliberate process which would set your mind at ease because you've checked and re-checked that the magazine is not present, the chamber is clear, and the extractor isn't holding a bullet in place, you're probably not someone who needs to be handling firearms.

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For the same reason people want a manual safety. Some are just not comfortable having to pull the trigger to disassemble or carry without a safety.

Personal preference.

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Common sense is an oxymoron. That’s why you can make a great living being a lawyer.

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Everytime I see this issue raised, It seems to always come with the obligatory  mention of Glocks. And Of course, a handful sharing their dislike of them. All good, to each their own.

It surprises me how many don’t realize it’s all based on a misconception. More accurately a falsehood.

 Truth is you can disassemble a Glock without pulling the trigger. 

 

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Some MFG say OK to Dry Fire.

My Ruger SR22 Rim Fire is OK to Dry Fire per MFG. I don't cause I figure what ever block mechanism they have built in is gonna wear some. 

My TAURUS 9MM Millennium G2 is NOT OK to Dry Fire per MFG. That said, it requires Trigger Pull to disassemble.  BY THE WAY, disassembly instruction in book does not say to Pull Trigger. I couldn't get the slide off and called TAURUS, they said Pull Trigger.  I asked why not in the book, they said don't like to tell people to Pull Trigger (HMMMM!!!!). 

Anyway, I pull trigger to disassemble as only way you can disassemble and it does not concern me (obviously gonna check gun is empty).  I don't use a snap cap then.

I Do Use a snap cap for other Dry Fire practice.  

 

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1 hour ago, Erich said:

Everytime I see this issue raised, It seems to always come with the obligatory  mention of Glocks. And Of course, a handful sharing their dislike of them. All good, to each their own.

It surprises me how many don’t realize it’s all based on a misconception. More accurately a falsehood.

 Truth is you can disassemble a Glock without pulling the trigger. 

 

Are you talking about taking the pins out instead of the regular way ?

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14 minutes ago, tercel89 said:

Are you talking about taking the pins out instead of the regular way ?

No sir, the context was field stripping and removing the slide. Sorry if that wasn't clear. You can remove the slide from a Glock without pulling the trigger.

This assumes you know the condition of your weapon and that its not loaded. And would be familiar with how to know a Glock is not loaded or has one in the chamber. But of course...these folks may still think you need to pull the trigger...so you know....

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8 minutes ago, Erich said:

No sir, the context was field stripping and removing the slide. Sorry if that wasn't clear. You can remove the slide from a Glock without pulling the trigger.

This assumes you know the condition of your weapon and that its not loaded. And would be familiar with how to know a Glock is not loaded or has one in the chamber. But of course...these folks may still think you need to pull the trigger...so you know....

Go on...

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8 minutes ago, Erich said:

No sir, the context was field stripping and removing the slide. Sorry if that wasn't clear. You can remove the slide from a Glock without pulling the trigger.

This assumes you know the condition of your weapon and that its not loaded. And would be familiar with how to know a Glock is not loaded or has one in the chamber. But of course...these folks may still think you need to pull the trigger...so you know....

Sorry , I am kinda confused . I just tried to take my G22 slide off without pulling the trigger and it wouldn't come off.  Forgive if I am missing something. I am definitely interested though.

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Oh sure. I wasnt sure if it was just those that dont own Glocks proliferate that hooey.

So in this scenario you have your Glock, with knowledge that its magless, extractor down and chamber empty. Safe to let your baby play with it. 

All you have to do is unload the slide catch, essentially just out of battery an 1/8" of an inch. Some folks bring it back and engage the slide lock or somewhere in between which will partially cock it.  Easiest way for me (being a righty) is to hold it in my right hand with thumb against backstrap and fingers over the rear of the slide using the index finger on the rear sight to just nudge the slide out of battery. Barrel hood just dropping under the slide but not moving rearward. Then pull the slide lock down as its no longer under load.

Or you can put it muzzle down into the table / cleaning matt and rock it forward to move it out of battery if you have any dexterity issues.

Edited by Erich

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7 minutes ago, Erich said:

Oh sure. I wasnt sure if it was just those that dont own Glocks proliferate that hooey.

So in this scenario you have your Glock, with knowledge that its magless, extractor down and chamber empty. Safe to let your baby play with it. 

All you have to do is unload the slide catch, essentially just out of battery an 1/8" of an inch. Some folks bring it back and engage the slide lock or somewhere in between which will partially cock it.  Easiest way for me (being a righty) is to hold it in my right hand with thumb against backstrap and fingers over the rear of the slide using the index finger on the rear sight to just nudge the slide out of battery. Barrel hood just dropping under the slide but not moving rearward. Then pull the slide lock down as its no longer under load.

Or you can put it muzzle down into the table / cleaning matt and rock it forward to move it out of battery if you have any dexterity issues.

You are going to have to elaborate even more.   Because I have to pull the trigger on my 17 to get the slide to actually move off the frame.   You can pull down on the takedown lever and get the slide to move a little.   But until the striker is no longer under compression, it will not come off of the frame.  

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13 minutes ago, Capbyrd said:

You are going to have to elaborate even more.   Because I have to pull the trigger on my 17 to get the slide to actually move off the frame.   You can pull down on the takedown lever and get the slide to move a little.   But until the striker is no longer under compression, it will not come off of the frame.  

Same here with me

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From the Glock manual.  Trigger must be in the rearward position.   

Screen Shot 2019-02-05 at 11.21.21 AM.png

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Uh oh :D

You are describing a condition where its already partially cocked. We are not talking about the same thing. Meaning the slide has been cycled first.

If you go back, you see I am taking about a gun, typically stored and uncocked.

If one follows the manual (preceding pics), you had already locked it back fully, visual check with slide lock, and run body parts into the chamber in case your visual inspection was not sufficient (mandated legal languarge ). If you have done this, yes you have to at some point pull the trigger. But most importantly, we are not taking the same situation.

We are touching on practices and how we check a firearm, or more importantly last left it after last use. I do not leave any weapon at part or full cock when unloaded. Hammer fired or striker fired, doesnt matter what name is printed on the slide.

The assumption here is after you finishing firing a weapon,or cleaning it, after the slide it back in battery it is uncocked via a dry fire (hammer or strike) to be put put back in a range bag, safe, or where ever. 

For example. I am at the range. I fired the last shot and slide locks back. I drop the mag. Then the slide, and pull the trigger while its pointed down range. I do this with any and all my guns. Same process with post cleaning assembly.

Now if you enjoy leaving it with the slide locked back after that last shot, or after a cleaning. This does not apply to you.

Nor to someone that fully locks the slide back to run the manual suggested checks for a clear weapon. Not to suggest being unsafe. I check via visual inspection thru an emply magwell, extractor chamber indicator, and press check. But again...that's me. I just like living dangerously according to the gun makers lawyers ;)

Now assuming you also have an uncocked Glock that you know to be safe and unloaded....you dont have to pull that trigger.

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I don't like Glocks because they are ugly. Nothing to do with the disassembly process.

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