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Training for reloading

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Does anyone in the Wilson County/Mid-TN area reload .45-70, 44 Mag & 45 LC ..... AND would be willing to help an old man set up (from scratch) his reloading?

You may consider the old man to currently know absolutely NOTHING about reloading.
Any brave soul out there?

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Too far away to help, but reloading is not complicated. The Richard Lee 2nd edition hand loading book is a good place to start . Also has a lot of load data. Need to be detailed oriented and practice common sense. Should be some one close to help you out, good luck with your new endeavor. Reading is your friendly way to get the basic knowledge on how to reload.

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I also highly recommend the Lee loading manual. There should be numerous videos on you tube explaining how to set up your machine. Good luck and start out slow.

Bill

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Read, watch video's and read some more.  The Lee loading manual is a must have.  I also like the Lyman.

Just remember you can never be too anal when it comes to loading, nothing like a squib to pucker you up.

You will enjoy loading and experimenting with different loads.

I load pistol cartridges, 32, 327, 9, 38, 357, 40 and 45

What equipment are you set up with?  

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There is, or was a reloading supply store in Mt Juliet, opposite side of  I 40 from the big shopping center.  They may be able to help you get going.

A LEE single stage would be a good press to start with, you have to do each step separately, which reduces the possibility of making a mistake.  I have a LEE breech lock single stage that I load 204R/223/22-250 on, have loaded enough ammo for p dog trips, so it can be done with enough time (I'm retired).  

The Lyman manual has good instructions, as does the LEE manual.  Hornady has some good info in their manual as well.  Get one of each for research purposes and to compare load data when the time comes.  Lots of people like the RCBS rock chucker for it's durability, quality, etc., but I've had no problems with my LEE.  Watch some utube videos on each of those and see which one you might like or prefer, check the store out that I mentioned above, and ask lots and lots of questions.  

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15 minutes ago, jpx2rk said:

There is, or was a reloading supply store in Mt Juliet, opposite side of  I 40 from the big shopping center.  They may be able to help you get going.

A LEE single stage would be a good press to start with, you have to do each step separately, which reduces the possibility of making a mistake.  I have a LEE breech lock single stage that I load 204R/223/22-250 on, have loaded enough ammo for p dog trips, so it can be done with enough time (I'm retired).  

The Lyman manual has good instructions, as does the LEE manual.  Hornady has some good info in their manual as well.  Get one of each for research purposes and to compare load data when the time comes.  Lots of people like the RCBS rock chucker for it's durability, quality, etc., but I've had no problems with my LEE.  Watch some utube videos on each of those and see which one you might like or prefer, check the store out that I mentioned above, and ask lots and lots of questions.  

Reloader's Bench: 201 N Mt Juliet Rd, Mt. Juliet, TN 37122

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My vote would be for Lee as well, but for a turret press.  It can be used as a single stage to learn on, then, if you want, it can be used in a more progressive fashion.  Lee has a reloading kit that pretty much has everything except the consumables which come at a good price.  Some of these pieces are rudimentary but you can upgrade once you know what to look for.

https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item/0000690304/classic-turret-press-kit

006-90304.jpg

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Spend some time at the reloaders  bench. I spent some time there when I first got my press. They helped me a lot with what I needed to get things going. Take a note pad.

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Excellent advice in this thread!

I have a Lee single stage I'm still running after 33 years. It just won't wear out LOL

I load all of my .38 and 5.56 on it and I'm currently loading .380 for my missus.

I agree with all of the positive points of learning on a single stage, it can and will help you with the so necessary attention to detail that's needed.

I learned from a Hornady Manual (1985 edition) and trial and error. But there are so many excellent resources available these days, especially on Youtube. Straight walled cases like the .38 spl are great rounds to start with. 

I agree on picking up several different manuals and read and refer to them. Handloading is very rewarding and is a great hobby in and of itself.

Consider purchasing a chronograph. You don't need an expensive one, but I find one is a necessity for accurate safe load development. I'll be chronographing several loads my next day off. It takes a lot of the guesswork out of the process.

Mine is a Competition Electronic Pro Chrono and it's given me excellent service for several years now.

https://ads.midwayusa.com/product/1015086064?pid=852429&utm_medium=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=Shooting+-+Chronographs%2C+Wind+Meters+%26+Timers&utm_content=852429&cm_mmc=pf_ci_google-_-Shooting+-+Chronographs%2C+Wind+Meters+%26+Timers-_-Competition+Electronics-_-852429&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI0tL599KO5QIVjonICh1uRwOPEAQYASABEgK0V_D_BwE

 

Excuse the mess in my handloading area. While I absolutely love my Dillon that little Lee is not neglected. :)

 

reloading bench 2019.jpg

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Oh goody, show and tell. I love my two 550B's. The Rock Chucker on the end is for rifle only.

Bill

 

IMG_1259.JPG

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depending on how much you intend to shoot/load, nothing wrong with starting with one of the progressive presses and load one round at a time.  this will save a little money and make it easy to progress as your comfort level increases.  I am getting my money's worth out of the Hornady LNL.  If you can find someone that has a pet load and especially if you can get one on one time with them, simply copy them as a starting point.

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On 10/9/2019 at 9:53 AM, chances R said:

depending on how much you intend to shoot/load, nothing wrong with starting with one of the progressive presses and load one round at a time.  this will save a little money and make it easy to progress as your comfort level increases.  I am getting my money's worth out of the Hornady LNL.  If you can find someone that has a pet load and especially if you can get one on one time with them, simply copy them as a starting point.

Thats how i started. Dillon 500 that you need to turn the stages manually. I used new cases to make things a bit easier and was able to check weights and crimp/depth frequently as i built up more confidence

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For a beginner, I'd vote for the Lebanon Gun Shop, as well. Class held by a NRA certified instructor. 2 consecutive 2 hour classes. Get some hands on, plus instructor to answer your questions.

Located on 102 Hartman Dr., near Burger King.  615-547-9600.  Good folks to do business with, have bought a few guns there.

Good luck with your new hobby. I've been at it since 1968.

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