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One1

Was it the gun, or the ammo? (45 ACP)

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I added yet another M&P to the collection and went shooting today. Having a Shield and a Compact, it was time for a full size so i bought an M&P full size 45 ACP (4.5” barrel). It’s my first 45 and I’ve done enough reading to know I wanted a larger gun, plus I’m trying to get one of each series of the M&P line. I shot it today and though it was louder than my 9mm, it didn’t flip as hard as the 9 does. It shot like a Cadillac. Solid, heavy punch.... but not any harder to hold on to than the 9. 
 

So the question is was it because of the full size frame (vs the 9mm Shield) or was it because of the low velocity ammo? I shot standard rounds  (230 grain vs 115 grain). I was very intimidated by the huge gun and bullet before I shot it, but it was an absolute joy to shoot and ended up finishing the first mag as quickly as i typically shoot my 9 (2 shots per second). 
 

D665-D75-C-070-B-4956-B1-A4-96-BB564-B88

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Simple physics. Big slow bullet out of a bigger, heavier gun has less recoil than a small fast bullet out of a much smaller, lighter gun. I've shot some pocket size .380s that down right hurt.  :eek:

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50 minutes ago, One1 said:

So the question is was it because of the full size frame (vs the 9mm Shield) or was it because of the low velocity ammo?

Both; its physics. The heavier the gun, the lower the felt recoil. The smaller the powder charge, the lower the felt recoil. Different mass of projectiles in the same caliber will impact felt recoil; but not by much.

Get a .40S&W Shield or a .357 Mag J-frame. If you can master those; you can shoot anything.

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It's both but probably the size more.  In my experience full-size guns in a normal service caliber 9mm/40/45 are fun to shoot.   The smaller the frame of the pistol, the more I prefer the 9mm to the 40 or .45.  

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Once I shoot my M&P Shield 45, I will give an opinion. To date, I have only shot 45acp through a full size 1911 (I’ve had two).

I too am curious how the lighter frame, shorter barrel will be as compared to a full frame 1911.  Hitting the range tomorrow so I will let you know. 

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I find the recoil from a large caliber handgun like a 45, or even a 44 mag, to be more of a shove, where a smaller, faster round, like a 9mm or 357 mag to be more of a sharp rap against the web of the hand.

More weight definitely reduces recoil, and more grip surface area seems to reduce felt recoil.

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So I went to the range at lunch and put about 50 rounds through my 1911 and 50 through my M&P Shield 45 and about 31 through my M&P Shield 9 (I only had what was in my full mags). The Shield 45 did not have as sharp a recoil as the Shield 9, but it was not as deep (for lack of a better word) a recoil as the 1911. I need to shoot both Shields side by side more to get a better opinion, but I already think I like the 45 more than the 9. 

I still like my 1911 the best. I can keep a decent grouping in the center and further out with it.  I still pull down and left with both Shields (not as bad with the 45).  That is a different topic, but I wonder what I am doing different. The trigger is definitely different between a 1911 and a striker fired pistol. That and the weight. It makes me wonder if that is the cause. 

Sometimes I just aim high and right. 😀

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I've said this before, but the Shield .45 is one of the underappreciated gems of the handgun world.  It handles great, shoots more accurately than is explainable, and carries almost invisibly.  I think most people dismiss it because they think a .45 in a gun that size will be more difficult to control than it actually is.  As you are discovering, Snaveba, that's not a valid concern for most shooters.  Lack of mag capacity is the only reason the Shield .45 isn't my EDC.  I do carry it when I need something more concealable than a full-size handgun.

The fact that you pull low and left with both Shields but not the 1911 makes me think your trigger technique may need some attention.  The pivoting trigger on the Shields works a little differently than the sliding trigger on the 1911.  Check that you contact the trigger closer to the tip of your finger than to the joint.  It might help.

Cheers,

Whisper

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Thanks for the input Whisper. I know I just need to put more rounds through both. Usually at the range on a work day (read lunch break) I put at least a box through the Shield 9 and the 1911, through the 1911 often gets more. I guess I just need to leave the 1911 In the bag more for the Shield 45. 

 

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On 1/5/2020 at 12:46 AM, DaveTN said:

Both; its physics. The heavier the gun, the lower the felt recoil. The smaller the powder charge, the lower the felt recoil. Different mass of projectiles in the same caliber will impact felt recoil; but not by much.

Get a .40S&W Shield or a .357 Mag J-frame. If you can master those; you can shoot anything.

I once had a Kahr k45....never again....

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I have a fullsize M&P45 and its a pretty easy shooter,45 overall is not that snappy anyway but for fun I do prefer 185G bullets over 230s 

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