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Hog hunting in Tennessee??


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First, let me say I’m not a hunter. I started another thread about RVing in Tennessee in the General section. I have a nephew that would like to hunt (Bow) if he comes here to RV. He is from out of state and I thought he could hunt hogs here, year around without a hunting license. But from what I’m seeing, it appears he would have to buy a hunting license and a deer permit, is that correct?

If not, what would he need to hunt hogs with a bow? What areas are best for that around here?

Thanks

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The regulations regarding hogs have changed recently.

https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/large/Wild-Hog.html

You'll want to read up. The easiest way to make this happen is probably by using a hunting lodge such as Loshbough, Caryonah, or a similar outfitter. Regardless, a hunting license is required for any hunting in TN. 

 

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14 hours ago, Chucktshoes said:

When it comes to hog hunting, I really wish they’d open up the use of NODS. 

Looks like you are going to have to buy some land. 🙂

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7 minutes ago, DaveTN said:

Looks like you are going to have to buy some land. 🙂

Still can’t use NODs. You can spotlight with a landowner waivers, but no NODs. They’re not allowed for any hunting use at all. 
 

I get it for standard big game. But in the case of hogs we aren’t talking fair chase, we are talking eradication. If we are already allowing night hunting in the use of bait, then why can’t we use NODs and thermal. It’s a dumb prohibition.

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15 minutes ago, Chucktshoes said:

Still can’t use NODs. You can spotlight with a landowner waivers, but no NODs. They’re not allowed for any hunting use at all. 
 

I get it for standard big game. But in the case of hogs we aren’t talking fair chase, we are talking eradication. If we are already allowing night hunting in the use of bait, then why can’t we use NODs and thermal. It’s a dumb prohibition.

I see. I assumed “artificial light” would cover that for a landowner. See what happens when you assume. 🙃

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It would make ecological sense if TN would allow eradication efforts with regards to coyotes and hogs to be conducted without any type of license, equipment or season restrictions.  Both coyotes and hogs are invasive species that wreak havoc on the native flora and fauna.

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44 minutes ago, Chucktshoes said:

Still can’t use NODs. You can spotlight with a landowner waivers, but no NODs. They’re not allowed for any hunting use at all. 
 

I get it for standard big game. But in the case of hogs we aren’t talking fair chase, we are talking eradication. If we are already allowing night hunting in the use of bait, then why can’t we use NODs and thermal. It’s a dumb prohibition.

That's not entirely true. A permit can be what ever the TWRA wants it to be. My permit allows thermal or night vision. The only real restriction I have is "Don't shoot towards a dwelling." 

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2 minutes ago, alleycat72 said:

That's not entirely true. A permit can be what ever the TWRA wants it to be. My permit allows thermal or night vision. The only real restriction I have is "Don't shoot towards a dwelling." 

I stand corrected, and happily so. 

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37 minutes ago, billyblazes said:

It would make ecological sense if TN would allow eradication efforts with regards to coyotes and hogs to be conducted without any type of license, equipment or season restrictions.  Both coyotes and hogs are invasive species that wreak havoc on the native flora and fauna.

TWRA tried to have a fairly open season on hogs in order to cut down the numbers. Unfortunately, it had the opposite effect w/ hog numbers spreading during this time. The officers I've spoken with implied that folks were catching them and releasing them to establish a huntable population in their area... so now we have the regulations that are in place.

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8 minutes ago, Chris said:

TWRA tried to have a fairly open season on hogs in order to cut down the numbers. Unfortunately, it had the opposite effect w/ hog numbers spreading during this time. The officers I've spoken with implied that folks were catching them and releasing them to establish a huntable population in their area... so now we have the regulations that are in place.

Assholes are always gonna asshole. 

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43 minutes ago, Chris said:

TWRA tried to have a fairly open season on hogs in order to cut down the numbers. Unfortunately, it had the opposite effect w/ hog numbers spreading during this time. The officers I've spoken with implied that folks were catching them and releasing them to establish a huntable population in their area... so now we have the regulations that are in place.

I can see that certainly being a problem. I know of restrictions in other areas which prohibit the relocation of wildlife. Maybe that’s already against the law in Tennessee and those jerks just chose to disregard that law.

Moving wildlife around runs the risk of spreading all types of diseases and parasites and that’s why other areas prohibit the practice.  That doesn’t stop people though from illegally relocating raccoons which they have trapped. That has led to the spread of rabies from one area to another. 

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2 hours ago, alleycat72 said:

That's not entirely true. A permit can be what ever the TWRA wants it to be. My permit allows thermal or night vision. The only real restriction I have is "Don't shoot towards a dwelling." 

I was gonna say that the info on the web doesn't specifically prohibit either if those. If they're good with spotlights, night vision isn't much of a stretch. 

1 hour ago, billyblazes said:

I can see that certainly being a problem. I know of restrictions in other areas which prohibit the relocation of wildlife. Maybe that’s already against the law in Tennessee and those jerks just chose to disregard that law.

Moving wildlife around runs the risk of spreading all types of diseases and parasites and that’s why other areas prohibit the practice.  That doesn’t stop people though from illegally relocating raccoons which they have trapped. That has led to the spread of rabies from one area to another. 

It is (and has been) illegal to relocate any wildlife without a permit. My wife used to work with a raptor rehabber. She had to keep a copy of the rehabber's license in her car in the event she got pulled over while transporting the birds. 

 When I finally showed my dad the regs and told him they'd confiscate his truck, he finally quit relocating raccoons and started planting them. 

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