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Ask me if reloading pays off!!


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Howdy, I thought I would post this just in case someone has that question rolling around in their noggin. I loaded .357 magnum with158 gr. Hornady XTP HP for hunting and defense. It cost me a tad less than $30 for 100 rounds. Ammoseek had 158gr Hornady XTP HP for $174.99 for 50 or $349.98 for the same thing I loaded for less than $30. Granted it took my time to do the work, but most hobbies like fishing, golf, hunting etc won't pay you $319.98 per day. Plus it was a nice rainy day and I was dry and all by myself.

Edited by Dirtshooter
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Well the 2400 powder this month $28.00, primers 13 years ago $19.96 per 1K, bullets not sure, but Natchez shooters supply had them listed for $23.29 per 100.

Edited by Dirtshooter
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I load .45 ACP

200 Gr SWC   .07 Each=$70.00 Per 1K

Primers .03 Each x 1000=$30.00

Powder  6.5 Gr Unique Approx 1070 Rds per Lb. 1 Lb-$20.00

Pays to stock up when prices are low.

Edited by AuEagle
Made mistake on bullet price.
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1 minute ago, AuEagle said:

Pays to stock up when prices are low.

Exactly and the reason for my previous question.  No one is going to get into the reloading game today and load at that kind of cost/round.

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Well other than the primers those prices I quoted were today's prices that is if the XTP's were in stock. If they shop around there are still good deals. You have to hunt. Plus I also cast lead bullets for .38 cal and .40 cal for my plinking loads and it would really hurt your feelings to tell you about $0.06 per round or $6.00 per hundred for plinking ammo than other that reloaded were on Gunbroker for $150.00 per hundred lead round nose bullets for .38 special.

Edited by Dirtshooter
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These posts always make me chuckle.  You may be saving on costs per round, but most of us end up shooting more. So we really don't save any money at all. 😉

Of course these days with the Covid, shortages and high costs, most of us are saving quite a bit because we aren't shooting at all. 🙄

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40 minutes ago, Grayfox54 said:

but most of us end up shooting more.

Ding, Ding, Ding, you win. That is one reason I started reloading. At $6.00 per hundred me and a shooting buddy will go thru $24 worth of ammo. I always make sure to take plenty of ammo in case my shooting partner that day doesn't have a whole lot, I tell him there is the ammo can, have fun, just help pick up the brass. So before the next range trip I can fill 'em up again.

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2 hours ago, Grayfox54 said:

These posts always make me chuckle.  You may be saving on costs per round, but most of us end up shooting more. So we really don't save any money at all. 😉

Of course these days with the Covid, shortages and high costs, most of us are saving quite a bit because we aren't shooting at all. 🙄

But I look at it this way...in the winter when I often don't shoot due to weather I load.

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3 hours ago, Garufa said:

Exactly and the reason for my previous question.  No one is going to get into the reloading game today and load at that kind of cost/round.

Don't rub it in... I am trying to piece together enough supplies to load a few calibers. I know I should have long ago, but space and free time are always at a premium in my house. Luckily I got the press, some powder, and some bullets at pre-covid retail. I also picked up a bit of brass at the range. 

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I started off reloading because I'm the type that enjoys doing everything myself by hand. I've never really noticed a significant cost savings except for. 50 BMG which I have to say is substantial. 

Let me know what you need, chances are I might have some of your missing components/powder. I standardized a lot of my plinking recipes a couple years back and have been sitting on about 20 random powders that I know longer use.  Maybe I should just take inventory and post it all up I'm willing to give most of it up free of charge. 

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A fellow reloaded friend  just posted, on another forum, he saw where a box of small pistol primers(1000) brought 237.00, at a online auction, with others going close to that mark. Sheetz guys! 

 

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13 hours ago, Ronald_55 said:

I know I should have long ago, but space and free time are always at a premium in my house.

When I first started reloading our rental house was a bit small. I mounted my press and powder unit to a board, and routed some slots to hold my scale and ammo boxes. When it was time to load I clamped that board to the kitchen table or coffee table, and took it down when done (or the wife started bitching).

Now that board is (semi) permanently to the workbench in my shed. Not perfect, but it got me loading earlier.

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The first gun show after Sandy Hook in 2012, I threw out the idea of looking for a return on investment when reloading, something I had pondered some 20 years before.  So I changed my mindset from a cost savings to a model of if I wanted to shoot, and maxed the credit card.  But within 6-12 mos most everything went back to normal, and though I reloaded from time to time, found myself resorting back to store bought ammo.  Fast forward 8-9 years later, I still have the same mindset of reloading, but now I have the experience and reload virtually all my calibers.  Glad I stocked up on a  life time supplies of powder, primers, bullets, brass etc. in late 2012.   I probably need to dump out the safe of guns in lieu adding  all my valuable reloading supplies in the safe.   I am heavenly blessed with large and small pistol primers, but none for sell!  Ha!  

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3 hours ago, ReeferMac said:

I mounted my press and powder unit to a board

It doesn't take much at all to reload. My wife and I rented a small condo while we built the house we live in now, and I used a Lee hand press and dippers to load 9mm while sitting on the porch swing out back. It's slow, but it works just fine. 

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3 hours ago, ReeferMac said:

When I first started reloading our rental house was a bit small. I mounted my press and powder unit to a board, and routed some slots to hold my scale and ammo boxes. When it was time to load I clamped that board to the kitchen table or coffee table, and took it down when done (or the wife started bitching).

Now that board is (semi) permanently to the workbench in my shed. Not perfect, but it got me loading earlier.

Your wife sounds way more forgiving than mine. A stack of mail on the kitchen table is more than she can stand. lol

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You guys are correct you don't need to build an addition onto your house to reload, now that would be nice, but. I built a small shed, a little less that 8'x8'. I have a workbench on 1 side, on the opposite side is the maybe 30" wide counter top on a 2x4 frame that I started working on in a corner of the utility room. I have the dillon square deal on the 30" counter, opposite is the Rockchucker with powder measure, I keep ammo cans under counter and workbench. I have 2 MEC shotgun loaders that I leave under the bench and attach to the workbench with bolts when I need some shotgun fodder. Oh yeah it would be nice if it was 20x20, but it serves the purpose, had a 5,000BTU A/C and a ceramic heater. Unless it gets into the 20's I can be quite comfortable and get some peace and quiet.

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I am hoping to mount a press to a board to be attached when needed to the top of the workbench I am trying to squeeze into the garage. I figured matching holes on the benchtop and board would let me mount with some carriage bolts I have. That way it is an easy on and off. Another option is getting a tool stand and mounting it there. I could move it around, but would need room to stick it somewhere. 

I have looked at sheds, but it would be hard to fit one in with power without either laying a lot of conduit or having it right at the house. Longer I live here the less I like the way the house and property sits. 

 

Without running this into a public laundry list, I think I have most of the equipment. Dies in some calibers are an exception. I am needing some powder to cover other calibers, some rifle brass, and bullets. I have a few bullets, but have not broken down to order 9mm online. At some point I will need SPM primers to load .357, but I do have some SP and a few bullets I can start on .38. SPL with.

I have gotten lucky on several things I have been able to catch in stock or I would be no where close to where I am. 

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9 hours ago, Ronald_55 said:

At some point I will need SPM primers to load .357, but I do have some SP and a few bullets I can start on .38. SPL with.

Every .357 Mag load I have ever seen uses SP primers, not SPM.

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4 minutes ago, TechAlG said:

Every .357 Mag load I have ever seen uses SP primers, not SPM.

I have been using the below as a general reference.  That is where I got that. I kind of figured it might not be the be all and end all, but it is a good place for me to look quickly. I know from what I read you can often use magnum primers in place of non magnum so I figured there might be places you could reverse that. I just did not want to assume that until I knew what powder and bullet I would be using.

It lists    357 Magnum .357 SPM

Primer Size and Bullet Diameter Chart from www.grafs.com

https://www.grafs.com/uploads/technical-resource-pdf-file/12.pdf

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Now you've got me questioning some things...I know that I questioned why .357 Mag didn't use a mag primer, but I can't put my finger on the info right at the moment.  I'll have to go back through my notebooks (357 Mag was the second cartridge I ever reloaded, and I'm still shooting that batch).

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1 hour ago, TechAlG said:

Every .357 Mag load I have ever seen uses SP primers, not SPM.

This piqued my interest, so I took a look at a few different manuals. My Speer manual has loads for both SP and SPM primers. Another manual shows loads for only small pistol primers. So as usual, follow the data in the reloading manual and if you experiment with different components pay close attention for signs of overpressure.

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I am finding similar results.

Lee 2nd Edition (Revised) shows only SP.

Lyman 48th shows only SPM.

Honestly, I've used SPM primers in .38 special loads, with no signs of overpressure (by mistake; I ordered SP, received SPM and didn't realize it).  I am *always* on the lookout for pressure signs, as should everyone who reloads.  I once heard a squib load on an active line from 7 lanes down, and the shooter didn't even realize it.  He was shooting some reloads "his buddy did."

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