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Air gun for shooting raccoons?


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I need to shoot some destructive raccoons around my house and would like to do so quietly.  My RWS Diana has proven handy for dispatching squirrels but I'm concerned it's too light for raccoon work.  I want the coon to be dead right there and not to linger and die a painful death.   Can anyone recommend an air rifle that's stout enough for raccoon elimination duty?

Thanks,

Whisper

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39 minutes ago, Whisper said:

I need to shoot some destructive raccoons around my house and would like to do so quietly.  My RWS Diana has proven handy for dispatching squirrels but I'm concerned it's too light for raccoon work.  I want the coon to be dead right there and not to linger and die a painful death.   Can anyone recommend an air rifle that's stout enough for raccoon elimination duty?

Thanks,

Whisper

Have you thought about live trapping them?

You can relocate them or dispatch them with a .22

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Actually, I hadn't thought of that.  I guess I'm not very imaginative.  And buying a Havahart trap would probably be cheaper than a new large-caliber air rifle.  

Although I have nothing against buying a new large-caliber air rifle.... 🙂

Thanks,

Whisper

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4 hours ago, Whisper said:

Actually, I hadn't thought of that.  I guess I'm not very imaginative.  And buying a Havahart trap would probably be cheaper than a new large-caliber air rifle.  

Although I have nothing against buying a new large-caliber air rifle.... 🙂

Thanks,

Whisper

I like the idea of a large caliber air rifle too,  but I don’t think they will be very quiet, at least from the reviews I read. 
And you never know if a raccoon will go down on the first shot. 

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It's best to get rid of whatever is bringing them in (garbage, outdoor cat food, etc.) if possible and let t hem go on about their business somewhere else. Relocating is a bad idea. https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/medium/raccoon.html

Relocation is inhumane. Although many people perceive relocation as a humane approach to resolving conflicts, it is in fact just the opposite. Relocated raccoons have to fight with already established raccoons for territory, food and shelter. Many raccoons do not survive relocation and those that do disrupt already established populations. Relocated raccoon kits are almost always abandoned as it is near impossible for a mother to carry and care for her young while also establishing herself in a new territory.

Relocation is ecologically destructive. Relocation of raccoons disrupts already established populations. Excessive dumping of raccoons into natural areas may result in ecological damage and has been implicated in the transmission of disease among otherwise unaffected populations. Many local parks and natural areas now have policies prohibiting the dumping of raccoons.

Relocation requires permits. Raccoons are protected under state law and relocation of these animals requires permits from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. If you hire a professional wildlife relocation service, be sure to ask to see their state permits prior to signing the contract.

 

 

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You know raccoons are pretty smart animals. I've successfully run them off with some well placed BB gun shots. Takes a time or two or three to get their attention, but after that, they get the message that it's painful to be messing with my trashcans.  Just a thought,

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I have a 10/22 with a "can", and when using Norma TAC ammo, all I hear is the action cycling.  Other ammo is a bit louder, but I was surprised how "quiet" things can be.  LOL

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11 minutes ago, jpx2rk said:

I have a 10/22 with a "can", and when using Norma TAC ammo, all I hear is the action cycling.  Other ammo is a bit louder, but I was surprised how "quiet" things can be.  LOL

You've had better luck than me. About 1 in 4 Norma TAC loads will be supersonic in my CZ 457 ProVarmint 16.5".

 

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Highly discourage relocation, you have to take racoons a long way for them not to beat you back home, much less get them far enough to not come back at all.  And, once you get one in a trap once, you will never get it in a trap again. 

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6 hours ago, monkeylizard said:

It's best to get rid of whatever is bringing them in (garbage, outdoor cat food, etc.) if possible and let t hem go on about their business somewhere else. Relocating is a bad idea. https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/medium/raccoon.html

 

 

I agree with no relocating, the couple I have trapped over the years died of lead poisoning. Interesting trying to get rid of what attracts them. I have a mouse problem and decided to try and eliminate some on the outside . Trying not to poison other animals I took some scrap PVC pipes and put the baited cubes in the tube. Every morning they would all be empty usually six of them. Decided there wasn't that many mice so I set up a trail cam to watch. It was a large fat raccoon. Six rat cubes didn't seem to phase him and he did it night after night. I tried staking them to the ground the coon just pulled out the stake. I finally staked and then put a cement block on the tube to keep the raider from stealing my rat poison. He still came back every few days for a long time checking if he could lift the pipe.

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When I was a kid, The neighbor had a big coon in a tree by their house and my friend shot it in the head with a 22mag. that took a section of snout off the critter with the ear gone. It was pretty mad at that point. It took 2 more hits to get it to fall out of the tree and it was still not dead. Pellet gun? IDK about that......

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I've read enough by now to be convinced that relocation won't be my policy.  I have obtained a Havahart trap and any coons I catch in it will not need relocation above ground.

Thanks for the discussion,

Whisper

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Catch a couple in a live trap when the get too destructive around the place. Put a 177 at 1200 fps in its forehead. Bag it up and in the trash it goes. Now if the weather is hot I go to a dumpster down the road and drop the bagged carcass off.

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Many years ago, I had a coon take up residence in my attic. I called TWRA who put me in touch with a local trapper. The trapper set live traps and caught the coon fairly quickly. No charge either. I can only guess that he made money on the pelt, but he never really said what happens after they're caught. I honestly don't know if anybody still does this, but it won't hurt to ask. 

One thing that trapper taught me is always cover your trap with something. A small tarp will do. He had wooden boxes built the perfect size for the trap to slide into. He said that raccoons are smart. They know a trap when they see one. However, they're so curious that they will investigate any dark hole they find. 😉

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