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It’s been awhile not sure where I stand…..


milby76

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It has been a long time since I was on here. I was almost killed by a co-worker last year that caused a traumatic brain injury as well as a stroke. The stroke caused temporary left side paralysis, after a year of therapy and lots of determination I gained back use of everything except my left hand. I said all of that to get to the where I stand. The fingers on my left hand are about 90% permanently numb. I can somewhat grip things but that is about it. My pointer finger stays fairly stiff.I’m not sure where I stand with any of my guns, and haven’t shot anything since my accident. I’m pretty sure I’m ok with rifles but not sure about pistols.

My carry gun is a Glock 43 with a Houge grip. My nightstand gun is a sig P250 .40 compact and I also have a shield .380 EZ. I know the way I grip and hold a pistol has changed but I’m just not sure how good I can control recoil. I am predominantly right handed thankfully. Has anyone been through anything like this or have any advice or pointers that would help me get back in the saddle so to speak? Thanks!

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Well first off, welcome back. My brother was involved in an accident that broke his skull into 5 pieces. Even the doctors didn’t t expect him to make it. Today he has hardly any memory of the incident but does recall every day of rehab. It’s a long road and he was left with many scars and only small impairments in his abilities. He is now retired and spends tons of time at his local gun range. This has done him a world of good. I would strongly suggest you call your local range and get started. We don’t know what we can do till we try. 

I hope your continued recovery goes well. I know the smell of gunpowder has a healing effect. 

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@derf sorry to hear that about your brother, hearing about his abilities is encouraging.

@billmeek I have dropped and inserted the mag as well as racked the slide several times on my Glock. It wasn’t perfectly smooth but I feel with practice I will get where I need to be. I’m concerned about my sig as the spring is much stronger and takes quite a bit of effort to rack the slide. I’m thinking of selling it in favor of a 9mm around a Glock 19 size.

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3 hours ago, milby76 said:

It has been a long time since I was on here. I was almost killed by a co-worker last year that caused a traumatic brain injury as well as a stroke. The stroke caused temporary left side paralysis, after a year of therapy and lots of determination I gained back use of everything except my left hand. I said all of that to get to the where I stand. The fingers on my left hand are about 90% permanently numb. I can somewhat grip things but that is about it. My pointer finger stays fairly stiff.I’m not sure where I stand with any of my guns, and haven’t shot anything since my accident. I’m pretty sure I’m ok with rifles but not sure about pistols.

My carry gun is a Glock 43 with a Houge grip. My nightstand gun is a sig P250 .40 compact and I also have a shield .380 EZ. I know the way I grip and hold a pistol has changed but I’m just not sure how good I can control recoil. I am predominantly right handed thankfully. Has anyone been through anything like this or have any advice or pointers that would help me get back in the saddle so to speak? Thanks!

Theres an EE at Royal Range that may be able to provide some personal experience on this. I don't know if he'd be part of the training staff, but if you reach out to Royal they may be able to get you in touch with him to do some type of lesson/assessment that helps you learn from his own adaptations.

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Welcome back!

My wife had a stroke a little over a year ago, recovery and rehab seems to have slowed down, but that is normal (according to her neurologist)

Gains for her from here on out will be small and slower.

Keep up the good fight, we'll keep you in your prayers to protect you from discouragement!

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Do you think maybe you could start with an air sort or pellet pistol, then move up to a 22, and then on to center fire? This would be a cheap and safe way to refine your fine motor skills I think.

We sometimes forget, but popping a beer can with an air soft or bb is a really satisfying experience as well as good practice.

Edited by gregintenn
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  • 5 weeks later...

I apologize for missing all the newer comments, still trying to get used to the new forum layout and functions. Thank you for all the comments and encouragement, it really means a lot.

I went to my local range last week and shot all three of my pistols. I can’t rack any of them, even the EZ, with my left hand. I was able to hold them with my left hand, rack them with my right then swap the pistols back to my right to shoot. Not ideal but it works for now.

I handled the recoil much better than I thought but I still need to work on a different and better grip. I have decided that my Sig P250 in .40 has to go, as it’s just a bit too much for me.  I bought a G19 yesterday off a member here to replace it. I plan on adding a rmr which will let me rack the slide with my left hand.

I looked at several new guns while at the LGS and the employee let me try to rack a few, including his personal Sig 365 xmacro, that had red dots. I was able to rack them all left handed after a bit of fiddling. 
 

Here is the results from all three at roughly 10 yards. All over the place but this was trying different ways to grip each one, it’s a start.

 

57DC06FD-CE44-4E5E-89DF-A0ACAA3F81B7.jpeg

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Have you considered a revolver? Just point and pull the trigger. For a right hander, the left is only used for support and to hold the gun during reloading. 

My wife had arthritis in her hands. When her .38 became too much for her, she switched to a S&W Model 30 in .32 S&W Long. She could shoot that just fine. Not exactly a man stopper, but it sure beat harsh language. 😉

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@Grayfox54   I have thought about a revolver and put hands on a few last week at my LGS. They would still be quite a pain to flip open and load the cylinder. I would have to push button to open cylinder with right,swap gun and try to hold with left, re load with right,try to pass back to right to shoot.

 Since my left hand is permanently numb when I try to grip and hold anything it’s pretty much all or nothing, there’s no light touch or control about it. It’s not easy letting go after a grip either. Basically I can open and close it, none of my fingers will move independently, they move together.
 

 

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5 hours ago, milby76 said:

@Grayfox54   I have thought about a revolver and put hands on a few last week at my LGS. They would still be quite a pain to flip open and load the cylinder. I would have to push button to open cylinder with right,swap gun and try to hold with left, re load with right,try to pass back to right to shoot.

 Since my left hand is permanently numb when I try to grip and hold anything it’s pretty much all or nothing, there’s no light touch or control about it. It’s not easy letting go after a grip either. Basically I can open and close it, none of my fingers will move independently, they move together.
 

 

As I read that. I think that’s how I unload and load a revolver, being right handed.

1. I transfer the empty revolver to my left hand. Just cradling the gun in my left hand.

2. Push the cylinder release with my right thumb. At the same time pushing the cylinder out with my left hand Birdie and ring fingers, while still holding the revolver in my left had.

3. I use my right palm to slap the ejector rod. That might be tricky for you, because you need a good hold on the revolver with your left hand.

4. I load the revolver with my right hand, while holding it in my left hand.

5. Once loaded, I close the cylinder with my left thumb and/or right hand.

6. Then transfer the revolver to my right hand to shoot.

That’s my manual of arms for loading a revolver, as I went through it in my mind.

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@Moped I didn’t even think to go through the reloading motions when I checked a few out last week, I only held them and dry fired one.I plan on going back to shoot more soon and will try to open and close the cylinder on one then.  Thanks for the info, gives me more to think about.

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18 minutes ago, milby76 said:

@Moped I didn’t even think to go through the reloading motions when I checked a few out last week, I only held them and dry fired one.I plan on going back to shoot more soon and will try to open and close the cylinder on one then.  Thanks for the info, gives me more to think about.

No problem! It was a mental exercise for me, thinking through the steps.

What might be nice is if you borrowed some else’s revolver, to practice with. Even if it was a .22. That actually might be a good thing to use, because it will make you use your fine motor skills. Sort of a therapy, if you will. 🙂

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If you decide to run a pistol with a red dot, you can use the red dot to help with the racking. Instead of gripping the slide with your left hand to pull it back, just put your hand on top of the slide, in front of the red dot such that it would hit the area between your thumb and pointer finger. Then push the red dot into that part of your hand to force the slide back. 

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@Snaveba I tried it on a few when I went to shoot last week. The guy working there even let me try his P365 x macro with a rmr. I was able to rack the ones I tried. That was a good feeling and a confidence booster.I just picked up a G19 from the classifieds yesterday that I’m going to swap slides and add a rmr to.

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2 hours ago, Grayfox54 said:

Moped: my technique is very similar to your's. However I eject the empties with my left thumb while the right hand reaches for the spare ammo. This is just a hair faster as it saves that ejection movement of the right hand. 😉

Try7IYO.jpg

In all honesty, that maybe how I do it to.  When I made my statement, I was at the hospital with my dad (he had cancer surgery today) and was trying to remember how I did it. I know that sounds stupid, but it’s mostly muscle memory, for me. Also I don’t carry a revolver much.
 

When I get home tomorrow, I’m going to pull out my 442 and run through it several times and see exactly how I do it.

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I'd suggest the largest, heaviest semiauto handgun you can stand to carry and hold. Think more along the lines of a full size or Tactical (e.g. Glock 17 or 34 rather than the G19 you mentioned). Better yet, choose an all-metal gun with the accompanying increase in weight and rigidity.

The additional weight and barrel length will put physics in your favor vs. recoil and muzzle rise. Static inertia and lever moment arm are greatly improved with a heavier handgun and longer barrel. There's also more real estate for your less-than-precision left hand to get comfortable with a supporting grip.

Edited by DocHawk
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20 hours ago, Grayfox54 said:

Moped: my technique is very similar to your's. However I eject the empties with my left thumb while the right hand reaches for the spare ammo. This is just a hair faster as it saves that ejection movement of the right hand. 😉

Try7IYO.jpg

GF4, you are correct.  That is exactly how I do it. 

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