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Scout Rifles


SUNTZU

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I've been looking into building a scout rifle out of a Mosin or other inexpensive rifle after reading a recent issue of Backwoodsman magazine. I toyed with the idea of making my Remington 7600 in .308 a scout rifle. I know its not a bolt action, but it is a rifle I already own. The way the 7600 is made, however, doesn't lend itself to a forward mounted optic. Do any of you guys have scout rifles, especially inexpensive ones? If so, I'd like to hear from you and see some pictures to get some ideas.

Thanks!

Sun Tzu

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i didnt see the article but i thought the point of a scout scope was for quick action and follow-up shots? IMO the bolt action is one of the slowest action types out there. now a lever action scout rifle makes more sense as does a pump action or a single shot break action(actually can be pretty quick with practice) and the ulitmate is a semi-auto like a springfield armory socom II.

maybe i am missing the entire concept though.

looking at pictures on remingtons website, i have to ask why it would not lend itself to having a scout scope? looks like a great platform.

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well honestly his concept is not valid anymore. he says that you shouldnt use a semi auto because it isnt as accurate and that you tend to not try as hard to make the first shot count as you have a quick second shot. change your mindset and concentrate on the first shot for that. and semiautos are now just as accurate as bolt actions so that point is mute

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Okay. Can I have about two grand for an AR setup I've been wanting with an ACOG? My mindset is to have a project to work on, which is a scout rifle, using either what I have or something inexpensive. Make your first shot count is my motto. Spray and pray, while fun at the range, is not how I intend to defend myself or hunt.

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no i wasnt saying that a semi auto is the only way to go but that him saying a bolt gun is a requirement fr a scout gun isnt really valid anymore because of advancements in weapons technology.

i think the 7600 you have would be perfect if you could mount the scope far enough forward. maybe look for a cantilevered scope mount like the remington 870 factory slug shotguns

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Seriously, give me two grand. :hat: I'm not trying to stay completely true to the requirements, just seeing if I can make one with what I got or get some cheap ideas for a project.

Something like this, I guess.

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That one isn't mine, too lazy to take pictures, but I did the same thing. Another guy on here did as well, but his looks nicer.

I bought a rack grade M1 and Scope mount from CMP and a Simmons pistol scope. I think all for under $1000. It might be sacrilege but its fun especially for my old eyes.

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I've always like the Scout concept, but for one thing. What do you do with a Scout Rifle if ever the scope gets busted up? Of course, that's the same question I use for ever non ironsited firearm too, not just the Scout Rifle.

I also watched the video, and I think I'd rather have the original straight bolt on a Mosin Nagant instead of the bent bolt. I'd think it would handle a bit faster, which in my mind is the reason behind the whole Scout Rifle Concept.

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Mosin 91/30 Tula Hex Reciever

Simmons 4 x 32 handgun scope

Scope Mounts

ATI Monte Carlo stock

Rockmount Bipod

Ammo sleeve for stock

Razr sling

Meets every definition of a scout rifle for less than 350.00, not to mention, that if I miss at less than 200 yards the concussion wave will still get them

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I've always like the Scout concept, but for one thing. What do you do with a Scout Rifle if ever the scope gets busted up? Of course, that's the same question I use for ever non ironsited firearm too, not just the Scout Rifle.

I also watched the video, and I think I'd rather have the original straight bolt on a Mosin Nagant instead of the bent bolt. I'd think it would handle a bit faster, which in my mind is the reason behind the whole Scout Rifle Concept.

If the scope is busted you should still have iron sights, at least that is my understanding. I don't know about the bent bolt, but the scope set up is what I wanted to show.

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Although with the M1 scout mount I have, you cannot use the iron sights with the scope attached so I installed quick release rings, which hold zero pretty good when reattached.

I've always like the Scout concept, but for one thing. What do you do with a Scout Rifle if ever the scope gets busted up? Of course, that's the same question I use for ever non ironsited firearm too, not just the Scout Rifle.

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I have a Steyr Scout. I didn't get the Jeff Cooper version, since I didn't see the point. I just got my own mounts/rings and put a Leupold Scout on it. The eye relief range is pretty amazing: 9-17".

What I like about the concept is the lightness, shorter barrel, and the fact that I can be more visually aware with both eyes open and neither one of them buried in the eyepiece.

It sounds like a fun project for you to do! Keep us posted.

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My thinking is that the forward mounted scope is the most visually recognizable feature of a scout rifle, but the most important details were a compact action, very light, exceptionally powerful, and almost impossible to break under normal conditions.

Cooper went into great detail to what he envisioned this gun to be like, but honestly a Marlin 336, modern AR, or most compact/youth centerfire bolt actions fit the bill just the same.

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Glass, forward mounted for fast target acquisition (try typing that while intoxicamated). Iron sights (ghost ring type preferred) for when (not if) the glass breaks. .30 caliber or better, in a caliber that is widely available. Light weight and short overall length for a fast swing and easy carry. Extra rounds onboard (a spare mag, for example) for quick, handy reloading. Col. Cooper felt a bolt action would better meet weight/reliability requirements than any autoloader. Accuracy wasn't a primary consideration.

The concept is a dependable, easy-to-feed rifle suitable for very fast offhand first shots.

Evaluate mission requirements before deciding on hardware.

SunTzu, the MN fails the requirements on several of points, primarily that of being a widely available caliber (for your expected AO). Secondary consideration is reliability. Far be it from me to suggest the MN isn't completely reliable, but you may want to pack along a sledgehammer, screwdriver, and 2x4 for those lightning quick second shots...

If I were bound and determined to turn a milsurp (read cheap) rifle into a scout, my choices would be a spanish mauser in 7.62, yugo M48 mauser or a swiss K-31. None fit the requirements of ghost ring sights, the second two fail the widely available ammo test, but all are very reliable (as Tam put it, the mauser action might not be as dependable as an anvil, but it depends on the make and model of the anvil), hard hitting, can mount a forward optic and are inexpensive enough not to hurt too much when you hacksaw the barrel. Hard to beat the speed of the K31 for that second shot.

As my overly developed physique is more suited to "find a hide and let the target do the sweating" than it is to "go looking for trouble", I don't feel a strong need for a hacksaw, but if it makes you happy...

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Thanks guys. I can't spend the money on a new, or even new to me, rifle right now. That's why I was going to see if I could use what I've got on hand. After reading more about scout rifles and responses on this board and others, I really want to build one. I'm going to revisit the Remington 7600 first. Otherwise, I'll wait awhile to start.

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Guest mustangdave

My Ruger Mini14 Tactical just about fits the bill...just need to add a scout rail and better scope/site. Caliber is a tic under that 30 caliber recommendation, it is small and light weight... reasonably accurate...though I shoot better using the iron sites currently...maybe with a better scope...and longer eye relief I can improve in that area.

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My Ruger Mini14 Tactical just about fits the bill...just need to add a scout rail and better scope/site. Caliber is a tic under that 30 caliber recommendation, it is small and light weight... reasonably accurate...though I shoot better using the iron sites currently...maybe with a better scope...and longer eye relief I can improve in that area.

Speaking of a heavy caliber on a light rifle, I was a little shocked (and knocked backwards) when I fired my Scout the first time. It's a touch over 6 lbs and is chambered in .308. Ouch.

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Guest mustangdave
Speaking of a heavy caliber on a light rifle, I was a little shocked (and knocked backwards) when I fired my Scout the first time. It's a touch over 6 lbs and is chambered in .308. Ouch.

would that be a Springfield M1A SCOUT? I have a lustful desire for a SOCCOM16

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