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jgrauman

TN HB 2225

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This is the bill that will allow CCW owners to carry in a bar/resturant as long as no alcohol is drank. there are some other revisions as well that would be great to pass. This has been going through the house forever and i haven't heard anything for a while and was wondering if anybody else has kept up with it.

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It stalls.. they use excuses like "guns and alcohol don't mix" even though people responsible enough to take the time for training and spend nearly $200 dollars for the right to carry their handgun aren't going to be the ones drinking. Lawmakers are also afraid that where there is alcohol there are drunks, and there are fights, and that drunks do dumb stuff (like grab an armed citizen's gun). Well I say horse ****. I have the right to protect myself no matter where I go. Other states (KY for example) allow carry where alcohol is served as long as 51% of the revenue is made from food and not alcohol - I read this a while ago. Someone please correct me if this is not the exact case.

When is the last time anyone heard of a drunk grabbing someone else's gun and shooting a bar? Well maybe that song Bubba Shot The Jukebox, but it was his own gun there :confused:

Besides, bars don't have metal detectors :D We're on our own until Nafieh is out of there.

Edit: Kentucky law states: Any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense beer or alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to that purpose; - so the way I read that is, you could go into a Ruby Tuesday, but not go sit at the bar.

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You're right about Kentucky's statutes. I carried all the time to restaurants like Applebees, Logans, etc. with bars back home.

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Yes, Kentucky is where I got my CCW training, and then I transferred it over when I moved here to Tennessee.

On one hand, I'm fortunate, because I don't drink, so I've got no reasons to go to bars. I also agree that guns and alcohol don't mix, so if you ARE in a place where someone is drunk and they cause a problem, the best defensive move you can make is to walk away.....

HOWEVER, when they wrote this law, they didn't just mean bars, and I DO like to go out to eat, so this means that when I take my wife out to dinner, I'm 'supposed' to be unarmed. I think that's ignorant, so I will be really glad when this one gets changed!

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Everybody email or write their reps over this one (and the other bill talked about on the board, like I did. Urge support and get out the word!!!

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Dumbest part of the law, IMO. There are sandwich shops, pizza shops, etc in Memphis that sell beer, there is no bar, there is a 'frige over in the corner that has some beer in it and they sell it. These are the very small eatery's not including the applebees, chillie's On the Border, and the hundreds of others.

Their is a reason for concealment.

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Just to clarify, HB 2225 is not the correct number. HB 1143/SB 1885 are the correct bill numbers. There are several other similar bills that have been introduced, I've found about 6 so far on the Assembly's website. But the abstract of HB1143 is below.

HB1143/SB1885: Authorizes person with handgun carry permit to possess handgun within the confines of a restaurant licensed to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises provided such person is not consuming alcohol while in the restaurant.

***********

There's some other legislation some people might feel is worth pestering their state congresscritters about:

HB2184/SB2143: Allows any resident, who has a valid handgun carry permit, to possess his or her handgun while within the boundaries of any state park.

HB0132/SB0053: Authorizes persons with handgun carry permits to possess firearms in all public hunting areas, refuges, wildlife management areas, and national forests managed by the state.

HB0067/SB0153: Prohibits employers and nongovernmental entities from prohibiting persons possessing a handgun carry permit from transporting and storing a firearm out of sight in a locked vehicle on any property set aside for vehicles.

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skwashdem, those are all very good points that should be discussed with your rep. Get them to realize that the more laws on the books they put, the more they handcuff law abiding citizens and help the criminal element to know what places are safe to rob, rape, pillage and plunder.

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If we are to get restaurant carry, we'll have to keep pushing. I don't know about the rest of those here, but I remember when the state did not make the distinction between on-site or off-site consumption. At that time, any place which sold any alcohol was off-limits. They then changed it to just places with on-site consumption. Hopefully, we will get that abolished altogether. As noted, TX, KY, VA, and IN have some form of restaurant carry.

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If we are to get restaurant carry, we'll have to keep pushing. I don't know about the rest of those here, but I remember when the state did not make the distinction between on-site or off-site consumption. At that time, any place which sold any alcohol was off-limits. They then changed it to just places with on-site consumption. Hopefully, we will get that abolished altogether. As noted, TX, KY, VA, and IN have some form of restaurant carry.

I forgot to mention, everyone contact your rep. We have gotten these bills through the senate in the past, but they always die in the house. Speaker Naifeh also plays a key role in make sure they die. :confused:

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From my understanding, its only illegal to carry in a place where alcohol is Consumed, not sold! Right?

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That's correct. As long as alcohol is not sold for on premises consumption, you can carry. Unless it's posted otherwise.

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From my understanding, its only illegal to carry in a place where alcohol is Consumed, not sold! Right?

Yes. Sorry for any confusion. I was making the point that years ago, the state did not distinguish between on-site and off-site consumption, so more places were off-limits. Therefore, progress has been incremental. Here's to hoping that the restaurant prohibition currently in place is legislated out of existence.

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Yes that is correct. I wonder how many convenience stores are held up by armed bad guys vs ummm lets see Applebee's?

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I wonder how many convenience stores are held up by armed bad guys vs ummm lets see Applebee's?

Darn good point db!

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I live in Franklin who do I need to get a hold of?

Lots of ways to find out who to contact. Easiest is just go here:

http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/government/elected.html

Click on "Who is my State Senator" or "Who is my State Representative"

You'll see a list of all of them, with a county or district search box below. Just click on your county.

This site will also let you do a bill search, search for campaign contributors, etc.

The NRA ILA also offers tons of info on candidates/office holders who support NRA positions (and those who don't.) http://www.nraila.org/

-Len

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Hello All:

I hope the following will be of assistance as we advocate for more sensible, logical, and effective firearms laws. Tips and techniques learned over the years concerning how to speak to you local politicos:

1) All emails are read. Almost.

Anything that resembles a "form" or "chain" email will likely not be individually read, although the number that come in to the office will be noted.

2) Phone calls are better. Usually. Call the office-holders office phone during normal business hours. Likely your rep/senator will not be in. Leave a detailed but CONCISE message -including bill numbers if calling about specific legislation. Provide day and evening call back info. Many reps return calls at night, on the way home from Nashville, on session breaks, etc. Be courteous and polite. Annoying a staffer is as bad -or worse- as annoying your elected official, who will remember favorably pleasant conversations with informed citizens.

3) In person can work. Sometimes. Many state reps and senators hold community meetings, listening sessions, etc. IMO, they all should. (One reason my current State Rep. is re-elected by landslides every two years even though he is a Democrat in a Republican county is that he ALWAYS out there and LISTENS to his constituients. They love him for it.) If you go to such a meeting, follow these guidelines:

a) Attend the meeting, dont just ambush your rep in the hallway afterwards. Chances are he/she has another meeting or is dying to go home and get some sleep.

:up: If possible, dont just stand up and ask your question/make your point. Talk to the rep before or after the formal part of the meeting (if there is one.) A handshake and a 1 minute conversation make a lasting impression as compared to some random hand raised from a crowd in back of the room during Q&A.

c) Dont try to "hog" the person's time. If you seem over-bearing, that will come across poorly. Shake their hand, make your pitch, and let them go.

d) If you live in a county with more than one rep and/or senator (most of us in urban/suburban parts of the state do), there is no law that says you cant approach other reps in your home town or county. I live in Gallatin, a town split down the middle by two reps, one from each party. They dont ask to see your voter ID when you ask them a question. If you show up, you are a constituient.

4) Have a consistent message for all your reps -we each have one Senator and one Representative. Make sure you contact BOTH. They talk to each other. ALOT. Even if they are from different parties. VERY LITTLE IF ANYTHING CAN PASS BOTH HOUSES AND REACH THE GOV'S DESK WITHOUT AT LEAST SOME BI-PARTISAN COOPERATION.

5) Have the FACTS. Get yourself some talking points from TFA

http://www.tennesseefirearms.com/ or the NRA-ILA http://www.nraila.org/ or whatever organization is out there concerning your issue. Seem educated and passionate about the issue, without being a one-issue voter or overly partisan. If you are seen as "that crazy gun guy," your impact will be less than if you are seen as "a typical voter in district xx."

6) Use partisanship to your advanage if you can. If an issue is seen as an "R vs D" issue, if you and your rep are on the same side of the aisle, that helps. However, in TN, it is often NOT that simple. MANY more issues are rural/urban or east/west than are R/D. What makes sense to a R from Memphis may not make much sense to an R from Jonesborough. It might be more likely that the R and D from Memphis agree more often than the R and R from different areas/backgrounds.

7) Be willing to compromise to a certain extent. For example, I can easily see the bill allowing permit holders to carry where alcohol is served to be amended to make it more similar to the law in KY (ok in the restaurant, but stay out of the bar) or to address concerns of inner-city legislators. VERY LITTLE legislation goes through the process un-amended in some way. Its part of the process and see it as a partial victory, living to fight another day, etc. It might also be necessary to amend to appease other groups, to match federal law or pre-existing state law, etc... If Rep "X" files your bill, runs it and it passes in some form, be happy. Be extatic. It is rare.

8) Be politically involved. Vote. Be seen. The better they know you, the more likely they will listen to you. (Assuming you are a nice person...)

9) Follow-up. Get your friends, family and neighbors to make contact as well. Write a letter to the editor. Who reads those? Your local reps do! Get others to write as well.

Hope this helps. Long-winded sometimes, aint I?

-Len

Hope the

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Hope this helps. Long-winded sometimes, aint I?

-Len

Hope the

That was one of the most informative posts that I have seen on this subject matter... EVER. Thank you for taking the time to write it!!!

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That was one of the most informative posts that I have seen on this subject matter... EVER. Thank you for taking the time to write it!!!

Yes it was.:up:

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let's get involved in this bill people, i am sick of leaving my gun in my car when going to get some food!

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let's get involved in this bill people, i am sick of leaving my gun in my car when going to get some food!

Me too. Sort of. :eek:

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