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Mrndt

Moly grease for guns?

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What do you guys think about using moly grease on the sliding surfaces?

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If it slides grease it. So many problems can easily be avoided if people would follow that simple rule...especially where 1911's are concerned.

I use Tetra grease but that's just me.

I do have a lifetime supply in a tub bought for changing an AR barrel. Will probably start using it when the Tetra runs out.

Dolomite_supafly uses it on everthing and swears by it . Maybe he'll be along soon.

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i started using moly grease when i got my first amt long slide

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Lubriplate without Moly is my grease of choice but I'll bet a Moly additive is just as good.

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I have a feeling this tube of molt 33 will do the trick then! :) just so happened to be free!

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I use grease on my CZ slide. I'm not sure what it is but it seems to work well and goes on great.

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I use Lucas "Red and Tacky" on slide rails and pretty much all bearing surfaces except the bolt in my AR. I use Mobil 1 5w30 synthetic for that. I keep some Remoil around for saturating surfaces before a final wipe down.

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Dunno nothin about it, but Dolomite was advising moly lube for slides, went looking in the auto parts store. Asked the auto store counter guy which moly would be good for gun slides and he said he uses 3-in-1 oil on his guns. So went browsing the shelves knowing nothin about it and came out with a squeeze bottle of Lucas Semi-Synthetic Assembly Lube. Label says it contains moly, zinc, and other un-named but presumably fabulous ingredients.

It is easy to dispense small quantities onto a Q-Tip for smearing on a slide rail. It is sticky but slick. So far it seems to stay on pistol slides a long time and it does not seem prone to migrate anywhere except where I applied it. Doesn't get grease everywhere after awhile. After shooting at the range a couple of times it is still easy to see the stuff on the slide rails, and it doesn't seem to attract enough powder residue and dirt to rapidly get filthy-looking.

Dunno if that Lucas Assembly Lube stuff is good, bad, or indifferent.

Sometimes in the past I used Militec which some say is real good but the Militec is not a conventional "slick" lube and I couldn't develop enough faith that it was really lubricating. The militec was kinda gooey and not especially slick when wet, then it would dry to nothing noticeable on the bearing surfaces. Maybe the Militec was lubing fantastic but to the eye it looked just like an un-lubed dry pistol. Difficult to figure out when to re-lube when it just looked dry and un-lubed all the time.

Lately was mostly using Rem Oil which seemed to work ok, but the Rem Oil is real thin and seems to dry out pretty quick. However perhaps the teflon from the Rem Oil keeps lubing after the carrier evaporates. Dunno anything about it.

That is one good "visual reassurance" about the grease-- You can look at the gun and easily tell that it is still greasy in the right places!

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I use the cheap tub of Walmart red grease. It has never failed me and stays where you put it.

Cheap too.

Mike

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I use moly grease on every wear surface on a gun. I buy the grease gun tubes that Walmart sells for under $5. I have taken AR's and added moly grease to the hammer/trigger junction and had people swear the trigger had been worked on. I use it on slide/frame junctions as well as hammer/sear junctions. People say that it seasons the metal, keeping it slick after the grease is gone. I honestly believe this besed on how well it has performed for me. Another great thing about the moly grease I use is it doesn't seem so sticky that it attracts debris. And once you wipe off the excess it rarely oozes out.

And that $5 tube is about 1/2 way gone now and I bought it about 3 years ago so it goes a long way.

The assembly lube is good but it is designed to break down as it heats up. That way it doesn't gum up and block passages on a new engine. As long as the gun didn;t get too hot it would probably work pretty well. I know because I have spent my entire adult life building cars. Also some assembly lube isn't as slick as others, some of it can be like honey.

Dolomite

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Been doing that for years using ARP (engine assembly lube) on slide surfaces. It's amazing how much better they move.

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Thanks for the good info, Dolomite.

Shoulda gone to walmart, but the autoparts store was just down the street when I decided to get some. I expected them to have grease gun tubes of moly if Walmart has em, and the store had a large variety of grease gun tubes, but no moly grease gun tubes. They had lithium grease and many other various kinds. I don't work on cars so doh't know what the different products are for.

That assembly lube wasn't expensive and its only about 4 ounces, so will go to walmart in a year or three when the assembly lube is gone. If it gets too runny or whatever under too much heat, probably my two .223 guns are the only ones in much danger of getting that hot.

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Wow, I didn't realize most people used grease. I've never used grease on any of my guns, only CLP. Maybe I'll try it sometime.

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Wow, I didn't realize most people used grease. I've never used grease on any of my guns, only CLP. Maybe I'll try it sometime.

You are going to be amazed then. CLP is a "all-in-one" product that does nothing really well. Grease works really well towards protecting as well as the function of most firearms.

Dolomite

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Is CLP significantly different/better than Rem oil? I think both contain teflon-like additives. The CLP I've used seems to have a stronger smell than Rem oil, but other than that, is there much practical difference?

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Rem oil tends to be really thin. CLP is definitely thicker than Rem oil. Rem oil is more like a cutting oil based on the consistency, about the sme as WD-40. CLP is thicker and also has cleaning agents in it.

I have started using a 33%/33%/33% mix of fuel injector cleaner, automatic transmission fluid and 30 weight synthetic in the same way one would use CLP. You could probably just add the two quarts together then add the gas treatment and it works just as well. It keeps the carbon loose and broken up. It works especially well on my 22's when they start to have malfunctions from all the crud they seem to get. A few drops and the carbon runs out. It is still pretty slick but has a very strong cleaning action to it. I buy large syringes and load them up that way. I grind the needle down so it isn't sharp and it helps you put it where it should be without a big mess. Best part is you can have a lifetime supply for under $7.

Dolomite

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16 minutes ago, chk said:

This too

If for your first post on the forum, you feel strongly enough about a topic that you resurrect an 8 year old thread; you should give your opinion on the subject instead of trying to redirect traffic to another forum. Don't you think?

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