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Nick@NKG

Water storage!

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I am looking into getting a couple 55Gl drums for water storage. I have heard  many people say to store them on top of plywood and to put plywood behind them and to make sure the drums are not touching anything. This is to avoid leeching of chemicals. My question is doesn't plywood have chemicals in it? do you not have to worry about leeching from the plywood??

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The plywood is to prevent metal drums from rusting. The drums should be sealed with minimal air space. Use food grade drums. New ones aren't particularly cheap. Used ones can sometimes be had for free, though your water may pick up some taste from whatever it previously contained.

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The plywood is to prevent metal drums from rusting. The drums should be sealed with minimal air space. Use food grade drums. New ones aren't particularly cheap. Used ones can sometimes be had for free, though your water may pick up some taste from whatever it previously contained.

Is this neccasary for plastic drums>? 

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heard some stuff about storing them directly on concrete and not to do it...not really sure. I have a few that I put on 3/4" 2'x2' squares, put casters under the wood, and ratchet strapped the drums to the squares using eyebolts. That way you can move em around if you have to. In a pinch I wouldn't worry too much about chemicals leeching in...dehydration would kill ya quicker. I think a bigger question is, what is your resupply plan? For me it would be a tarp on the roof, barrel under the downspout, then filtered from the barrel to point of consumption. For planning purposes, 1mm of rain on 1 sq meter of roof yields 1 liter..(not counting evaporation)...soo...extrapolate the data...a good steady rain for an hour on a 40x24 roof? figure around 100 square meters of roof deck x 1/2 inch of rain (12 mm)=1200 liters or around 500 gallons..

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[quote name="peejman" post="1103888" timestamp="1391129518"]The plywood is to prevent metal drums from rusting. The drums should be sealed with minimal air space. Use food grade drums. New ones aren't particularly cheap. Used ones can sometimes be had for free, though your water may pick up some taste from whatever it previously contained.[/quote] This||||||||

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Is this necessary for plastic drums>? 

 

 

If plastic drums start rusting, you have bigger worries.  :)

 

Unsealed concrete wicks water up out of the ground.  You'll notice that anything you sit on top of a concrete stepping stone or cement blocks will be wet on the bottom.  That moisture will cause steel drums to corrode.  You can reduce, but not eliminate the effect by adding a moisture barrier (plastic sheeting) between the concrete and the ground.  Plywood or a pallet works well too. 

 

 

heard some stuff about storing them directly on concrete and not to do it...not really sure. I have a few that I put on 3/4" 2'x2' squares, put casters under the wood, and ratchet strapped the drums to the squares using eyebolts. That way you can move em around if you have to. In a pinch I wouldn't worry too much about chemicals leeching in...dehydration would kill ya quicker. I think a bigger question is, what is your resupply plan? For me it would be a tarp on the roof, barrel under the downspout, then filtered from the barrel to point of consumption. For planning purposes, 1mm of rain on 1 sq meter of roof yields 1 liter..(not counting evaporation)...soo...extrapolate the data...a good steady rain for an hour on a 40x24 roof? figure around 100 square meters of roof deck x 1/2 inch of rain (12 mm)=1200 liters or around 500 gallons..

 

 

Keep in mind that a full 55 gal barrel weighs about 400 lbs.  Given its shape, it'll be incredibly difficult to move without a barrel dolly. 

 

I have a 50 gal purpose made rain barrel.  The water that ends up in it is quite nasty.  It'd take some serious purifying before I'd drink it. 

 

And also keep in mind that most people have at least 40 gallons of fresh water readily available... in your water heater. 

Edited by peejman

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If plastic drums start rusting, you have bigger worries.  :)

 

Unsealed concrete wicks water up out of the ground.  You'll notice that anything you sit on top of a concrete stepping stone or cement blocks will be wet on the bottom.  That moisture will cause steel drums to corrode.  You can reduce, but not eliminate the effect by adding a moisture barrier (plastic sheeting) between the concrete and the ground.  Plywood or a pallet works well too. 

 

 

 

 

Keep in mind that a full 55 gal barrel weighs about 400 lbs.  Given its shape, it'll be incredibly difficult to move without a barrel dolly. 

 

I have a 50 gal purpose made rain barrel.  The water that ends up in it is quite nasty.  It'd take some serious purifying before I'd drink it. 

 

And also keep in mind that most people have at least 40 gallons of fresh water readily available... in your water heater. 

400 lbs...yep, that.s why the mobile base...works well. Purifying...check. Water heater....already factored in to the planning mix

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[quote name="peejman" post="1104047" timestamp="1391173539"]If plastic drums start rusting, you have bigger worries. :) Unsealed concrete wicks water up out of the ground. You'll notice that anything you sit on top of a concrete stepping stone or cement blocks will be wet on the bottom. That moisture will cause steel drums to corrode. You can reduce, but not eliminate the effect by adding a moisture barrier (plastic sheeting) between the concrete and the ground. Plywood or a pallet works well too. Keep in mind that a full 55 gal barrel weighs about 400 lbs. Given its shape, it'll be incredibly difficult to move without a barrel dolly. I have a 50 gal purpose made rain barrel. The water that ends up in it is quite nasty. It'd take some serious purifying before I'd drink it. And also keep in mind that most people have at least 40 gallons of fresh water readily available... in your water heater. [/quote] but if the water supply gets tainted like recently happened in Charleston(?) Your water heater won't do you any good because the water might all be full of chemicals before you realize there is a problem. I think plastic 55gal drums are the way to go. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

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Do you guys think its wise to buy 55GL drums used? I would be slightly worried about the integrity of the drum. How much do they run new?

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Do you guys think its wise to buy 55GL drums used? I would be slightly worried about the integrity of the drum. How much do they run new?

 

 

Depends entirely on what they previously contained.  New food grade barrels are hard to find if you're not in the food business.  What little I see is $100 and up, and you might have to buy 10 of them.

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Ok I will chime in, I work for a chemical company. DO NOT use a poly drum if you don't for sure know what was in it. The poly drums are made of HDPE and they are more porous than you would think. Any harmful chemicals can leech out for years. You cannot wash them out and use them for drinking or cooking. You could use for gardens if you can see algae growing in them, that is a good thing. If you can for sure see that it contained a food like syrup for soda then you could thoroughly clean and use it. You cannot be too careful, they may look good, smell good, and make you very sick or even kill you. Be careful!!!

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