Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ok folks Med. supplies. What all do you stock and should a person stock. What do you do about expiration date, how far past a date is the item still good. I have the basics now in the car and home. What else do you suggest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Band aids, super glue, duct tape, and Benadryl. What else could you need? Seriously carry what you know how to use. My kit contains: Gauze Tape Band aids Para cord 800mg ibuprofen (about 2 years expired) Benadryl Gloves Hand sanitizer A multi tool Knife Nail clippers Lighter Might be a few other things floating in the bottom but that is what I carry everyday. I'm not medically trained so anything that requires more expertise doesn't have a place in my bag. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Mine is not complete but includes all typical first aid kit items and some trauma items. I'm still working on trauma/ major medical items but have some already such as sutures, scalpels, various gauze, quick clot gauze, forceps, IV tubing with saline solution just to name a few. I would like to host a weekend plinking/camp out with someone to come go over some medical how to for some local TGO members but haven't gotten around to setting it up yet. I can use most items that I have in my kit so far but I would never let lack of knowing how to use or administer something stop me from having it in my kit because if I (or anyone else) get hurt and there happens to a nurse, ems, doctor or even a fire fighter around, i'd sure like to have anything they need there at their disposal. It's at least fairly common to hear of an automobile accident or some other emergency that happens where it just so happens that one of the by standers happen to work in the medical field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what you are worried about...If it's minor first aid and the sniffles a few bandaids, rolls of gauze and some OTC meds should do the trick. If it's major AW S*** and you are thinking pretty bad trauma and infections, then thinks like antibiotics and celox/quick clot come to mind. I think the thing to remember however, is that unless things really fall apart, higher medical care will and should be the follow on to first line care. If things are so bad that higher care isn't available and a person is going to die without it, then he is pretty much screwed regardless of what you do.

     I personally prescribe to the 3 categories of patient conditions....those who are going to live no matter what you do, those who are going to die no matter what you do, and those who MAY live if you do something (and the right thing in time). The first two then are more or less irrelevant, it is the 3rd that you make the difference. 

 

So what do I stock?...(keeping in mind I have YEARS of training and experience)

Bandaging material and hemostatics (quick clot)

Splinting material

First line airway maintenance stuff (nasopharyngeal and J Tubes). I don't bother with intubation, IMHO if they are in that much trouble...shrug

A few VERY large bore needles 

Bandage Shears

A few instruments (hemostats, tissue forceps, scalpels, suture needle holders) and suture material

Stethoscope and BP cuff

Otoscope & Opthalmoscope

Lidocaine

Epinephrine

Benadry (injectable and oral)

Compazine suppositories (stops vomiting)

Gentamycin optic antibiotic solution

Rocephin injectable solution

Dental caulk

Oral penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and keflex

Triple antibiotic ointment

Aspirin

Loperamide

SF Medical Handbook

Merck Manual

 

 

One thing that I do NOT stock, and many people think this is odd, are IVs and I'll tell you why. To begin with, the chances of REALLY needing IVs is rather remote. If the issue is rehydration you can do it orally or rectally (which obtw doesn't require perfectly sterile/dated fluids that need to be at body temp) combine this with compazine, and you shutdown the vomiting. If you need it because of trauma (aka blood loss) your first action had better be to stop the bleeding! Further, if you are pushing crystalloids (Saline or Ringers) all you are doing is expanding volume to maintain BP...you are not replacing red cells,  platelets, or plasma. You can administer fluids orally or rectally with less risk (again, what are the chances?). Keep in mind that trauma patients generally need SURGERY to become stable and out of danger. Without it they will also (usually) become stable and out of danger....dead.

 

So where do I get the script stuff?...there is a company in Alaska called Medcall Assist (www.medcallassist.com) they operate a telemedicine system designed for remote areas/off shore fishing. You set up an account, do a brief medical history, and they can send you what you want minus narcotics (which is a good thing). However, and we all know this...DO NOT EXCEED WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF/TRAINED TO DO!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what you are worried about...If it's minor first aid and the sniffles a few bandaids, rolls of gauze and some OTC meds should do the trick. If it's major AW S*** and you are thinking pretty bad trauma and infections, then thinks like antibiotics and celox/quick clot come to mind. I think the thing to remember however, is that unless things really fall apart, higher medical care will and should be the follow on to first line care. If things are so bad that higher care isn't available and a person is going to die without it, then he is pretty much screwed regardless of what you do.

   

. . .DO NOT EXCEED WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF/TRAINED TO DO!

 

 

^this, my kit is very similar to his this with a few exceptions/substitutions, though I am also anti-IV in most settings. I've made decisions on each particular medication stocked with regard to what else is around my house and my specific training in the use of some of them.

 

For example I keep Atropine on hand, not because I'm worried about terrorist nerve gas attacks(that's just a possible side benefit, I guess) but because I frequently use an insecticide around the house which contains an organophosphate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what you are worried about...If it's minor first aid and the sniffles a few bandaids, rolls of gauze and some OTC meds should do the trick. If it's major AW S*** and you are thinking pretty bad trauma and infections, then thinks like antibiotics and celox/quick clot come to mind. I think the thing to remember however, is that unless things really fall apart, higher medical care will and should be the follow on to first line care. If things are so bad that higher care isn't available and a person is going to die without it, then he is pretty much screwed regardless of what you do.

     I personally prescribe to the 3 categories of patient conditions....those who are going to live no matter what you do, those who are going to die no matter what you do, and those who MAY live if you do something (and the right thing in time). The first two then are more or less irrelevant, it is the 3rd that you make the difference. 

 

So what do I stock?...(keeping in mind I have YEARS of training and experience)

Bandaging material and hemostatics (quick clot)

Splinting material

First line airway maintenance stuff (nasopharyngeal and J Tubes). I don't bother with intubation, IMHO if they are in that much trouble...shrug

A few VERY large bore needles 

Bandage Shears

A few instruments (hemostats, tissue forceps, scalpels, suture needle holders) and suture material

Stethoscope and BP cuff

Otoscope & Opthalmoscope

Lidocaine

Epinephrine

Benadry (injectable and oral)

Compazine suppositories (stops vomiting)

Gentamycin optic antibiotic solution

Rocephin injectable solution

Dental caulk

Oral penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and keflex

Triple antibiotic ointment

Aspirin

Loperamide

SF Medical Handbook

Merck Manual

 

 

One thing that I do NOT stock, and many people think this is odd, are IVs and I'll tell you why. To begin with, the chances of REALLY needing IVs is rather remote. If the issue is rehydration you can do it orally or rectally (which obtw doesn't require perfectly sterile/dated fluids that need to be at body temp) combine this with compazine, and you shutdown the vomiting. If you need it because of trauma (aka blood loss) your first action had better be to stop the bleeding! Further, if you are pushing crystalloids (Saline or Ringers) all you are doing is expanding volume to maintain BP...you are not replacing red cells,  platelets, or plasma. You can administer fluids orally or rectally with less risk (again, what are the chances?). Keep in mind that trauma patients generally need SURGERY to become stable and out of danger. Without it they will also (usually) become stable and out of danger....dead.

 

So where do I get the script stuff?...there is a company in Alaska called Medcall Assist (www.medcallassist.com) they operate a telemedicine system designed for remote areas/off shore fishing. You set up an account, do a brief medical history, and they can send you what you want minus narcotics (which is a good thing). However, and we all know this...DO NOT EXCEED WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF/TRAINED TO DO!

 

Very nice list! Most of my items were given by physicians so I took what I could get. I'm building upon those as I think of things I need but your list brought some things to mind. Awesome link you provided.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what you are worried about...If it's minor first aid and the sniffles a few bandaids, rolls of gauze and some OTC meds should do the trick. If it's major AW S*** and you are thinking pretty bad trauma and infections, then thinks like antibiotics and celox/quick clot come to mind. I think the thing to remember however, is that unless things really fall apart, higher medical care will and should be the follow on to first line care. If things are so bad that higher care isn't available and a person is going to die without it, then he is pretty much screwed regardless of what you do.

     I personally prescribe to the 3 categories of patient conditions....those who are going to live no matter what you do, those who are going to die no matter what you do, and those who MAY live if you do something (and the right thing in time). The first two then are more or less irrelevant, it is the 3rd that you make the difference. 

 

So what do I stock?...(keeping in mind I have YEARS of training and experience)

Bandaging material and hemostatics (quick clot)

Splinting material

First line airway maintenance stuff (nasopharyngeal and J Tubes). I don't bother with intubation, IMHO if they are in that much trouble...shrug

A few VERY large bore needles 

Bandage Shears

A few instruments (hemostats, tissue forceps, scalpels, suture needle holders) and suture material

Stethoscope and BP cuff

Otoscope & Opthalmoscope

Lidocaine

Epinephrine

Benadry (injectable and oral)

Compazine suppositories (stops vomiting)

Gentamycin optic antibiotic solution

Rocephin injectable solution

Dental caulk

Oral penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and keflex

Triple antibiotic ointment

Aspirin

Loperamide

SF Medical Handbook

Merck Manual

 

 

One thing that I do NOT stock, and many people think this is odd, are IVs and I'll tell you why. To begin with, the chances of REALLY needing IVs is rather remote. If the issue is rehydration you can do it orally or rectally (which obtw doesn't require perfectly sterile/dated fluids that need to be at body temp) combine this with compazine, and you shutdown the vomiting. If you need it because of trauma (aka blood loss) your first action had better be to stop the bleeding! Further, if you are pushing crystalloids (Saline or Ringers) all you are doing is expanding volume to maintain BP...you are not replacing red cells,  platelets, or plasma. You can administer fluids orally or rectally with less risk (again, what are the chances?). Keep in mind that trauma patients generally need SURGERY to become stable and out of danger. Without it they will also (usually) become stable and out of danger....dead.

 

So where do I get the script stuff?...there is a company in Alaska called Medcall Assist (www.medcallassist.com) they operate a telemedicine system designed for remote areas/off shore fishing. You set up an account, do a brief medical history, and they can send you what you want minus narcotics (which is a good thing). However, and we all know this...DO NOT EXCEED WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF/TRAINED TO DO!

 

Very nice list! Most of my items were given by physicians so I took what I could get. I'm building upon those as I think of things I need but your list brought some things to mind. Awesome link you provided.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Besides a lot of the items already mentioned, in smaller first aid kits for vehicle, camping and the medicine cabinet... I keep one of these in the supply locker: Elite Large Fully Stocked GI Issue Medic First Aid Kit Bag by Elite First Aid http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003H2EODW/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_4trytb11XQF5A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just throwing this out there as another source, Chinook Med.  I've used them in the past and have always had good experiences with them.  They have some pre-built kits for things like sutures and wound cleaning and a number of other things that I can't list off the top of my head.

Edited by gjohnsoniv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep mine pretty simple, since I have no medical training.

 

Bandaids

Bandaging

Super Glue

Med and Duct tape

Benadryl

Amox, Keflex and Cipro

Aspirin

Lortab and Oxycodone

Triple antibiotic

Knife

Alcohol

Emetrol and Loperimide

Tweezers

Back up prescriptions for fam

Whistle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A smart man once told me that even if you have no medical training, the medical kit you carry may likely not be used BY you, but be used ON you by a trained off-the-clock doctor, nurse, medic, etc, who finds you and stops to help but doesn't have their own equipment with them.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

So where do I get the script stuff?...there is a company in Alaska called Medcall Assist (www.medcallassist.com) they operate a telemedicine system designed for remote areas/off shore fishing. You set up an account, do a brief medical history, and they can send you what you want minus narcotics (which is a good thing). However, and we all know this...DO NOT EXCEED WHAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF/TRAINED TO DO!

Interesting group right there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay... here is mine.

I check and rotate out what needs to be twice a year, when we set the clocks forward and back.

This includes diabetic syringes so the seals don't dry out.)

 

This kit stays in my bag. Besides it going with me to and from work, it is also the bag I grab when we go camping, vacation, the range, etc.

(BTW, this is a condor Rip-Away EMT Pouch. It's held up really well.)

 

Kit_listed.jpg

 

Kit Contents:

1. CPR Mask / Gloves

2. Israeli Bandage

3. Ace Bandage

4. 4 pair gloves (If it's bad I double bag)

5. 2 tampons / 4 "Napkin"Pads / 4-4"Gauze Squares

6. Glucagon Injection (We call them "Gluks")

7. 3 rolls (4" 4yrd Sterile Strecth Gauze)

8. 2 packs Combat Gauze

9. Waterproof tape

10. CAT Tourney

11. Assorted Bandaids / Ibuprofen / Acetaminophen / Benadryl / little Burn Gel packs / Small cake icing gel / Alcohol Pads

*Need to put a couple of Chest Seals in there.

 

Main purpose of my kit is to treat boo-boos and for truama related injuries to be able to stabilize until EMTs arrive. Obviously I have a higher risk of needing to treat hypoglycemia than most people.

 

In all vehicles I have a mini first aid kit. It does not have all this stuff but most of it. The main thing is it is supplemented with an emegency diabetic supply kit that holds everything in the picture below in a used Gluclose Bottle. (See below.) For when we are out and he has forgotten something. (This has came in really handy a couple of times!!)

 

DSCN3060small-1.jpg

Edited by creeky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A smart man once told me that even if you have no medical training, the medical kit you carry may likely not be used BY you, but be used ON you by a trained off-the-clock doctor, nurse, medic, etc, who finds you and stops to help but doesn't have their own equipment with them.

 

 This was my point exactly. While I may not always have more extreme items with me I certainly won't let not knowing what to do with them stop me from owning them for just the reason you mentioned. I also would not attempt to use anything that I do not have any idea how to use even if I have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't know already, invest in lots of unpasteurized honey.  Pasteurization breaks down some of the enzymes that gives honey its healing powers.  Honey is especially good for open and infected wounds.  It promotes healing by secondary intention (i.e., such as a hole in your skin that you can't suture closed).  There was one study comparing various products for bedsores. Unpasteurized honey provided the fastest healing and most comfort to the patients.

 

I use it regularly when with have dogs and cats with large wounds that can't be closed due to infection or tension on the wound.  It's a mess to work with, and it must be bandaged properly.  I have healed some very large, bad wounds using a combination of sterile saline to flush the wound, unpasteurized honey in the wound, and then typical wound bandaging techniques.  There is a type of honey from New Zealand that is supposed to best (manuka honey), but for my entire veterinary career I have used local Tennessee honey.  There are many commercial products in the medical field designed to do the same thing, but honey is much cheaper.  There is even a product that is honey-impregnated gauze.  

 

Also, this is not some far-out, holistic mumbo jumbo.  I have personally used it for years, but every continuing education course on wound healing that I have attended mentions honey. Granulated sugar works too, but honey sticks in the wound better.  Vets tend to be cheap, so we look for things like this and use them regularly.  I have no idea how prevalent it is in human medicine, but many vets use it.

 

The other bonus of storing honey is that it's a food source too, so it's a multi-tasker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Honey's advantage is that it is bacteriostatic- bacteria cant live/reproduce in it. Its not that it in and of itself had special curative powers. It is yummy though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent post and list theconstitutionrocks. :up:

 

While I have several books on my shelf near my Med Gear stock, I too keep the SF Manual in my major FAK. It's a proven resource.

 

I do keep IV supplies. But these are not "Care Under Fire" items, but have come in handy many times over the years. (I do this for a living and start about 100 IV's each and every week.)

 

 

I've used Chinook Med many times as well gjohnsonV. Great company and very helpful. Moore Medical is a good asset as well.

 

dawgdoc,

I totally agree. Honey is a must have, and yes we do still use it in various forms in hospital.

I've used mixtures of granulated sugar and iodine/betadine and honey/betadine since the early 1970's.

 

Honey and sugar have been used in wound treatment, documented, since the time of the Roman Legions.

 

 

molonlabe....Excellent Point.

While I am not a smart man, I have been telling folks this same thing for years..some listen, some don't... :cool:

 

"A smart man once told me that even if you have no medical training, the medical kit you carry may likely not be used BY you, but be used ON you by a trained off-the-clock doctor, nurse, medic, etc, who finds you and stops to help but doesn't have their own equipment with them."

Edited by prag

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honey's advantage is that it is bacteriostatic- bacteria cant live/reproduce in it. Its not that it in and of itself had special curative powers. It is yummy though!


It does promote granulation tissue formation and decreases inflammation, so it has wound healing properties beyond its antibacterial properties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As of right now I have a trauma kit on my BOB and a basic first aid kit in the bathroom and in my storage building I have a plastic tote about half full of gauze and bandages sterile water for rinsing wounds and a bunch of other random medical stuff thanks to my father in-law who was a home health nurse. I hope to expand with some suture kits syringes and some over the counter medications as well as fish antibiotics. Edited by tennessee01tacoma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As of right now I have a trauma kit on my BOB and a basic first aid kit in the bathroom and in my storage building I have a plastic tote about half full of gauze and bandages sterile water for rinsing wounds and a bunch of other random medical stuff thanks to my father in-law who was a home health nurse. I hope to expand with some suture kits syringes and some over the counter medications as well as fish antibiotics.

 

Sending a pm your way

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Interesting that the honey topic came up on here today because I was just reading an article on it the morning. Seems legit to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just started on this myself as well. I got a deal I couldn't pass up on 5 packs of QuickClot Combat Gauze for $7ea a while back. I incorporated 2 into my range bag and 3 into my go-vest IFAK, that in itself I'm still putting together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any prescription meds that you could stop taking if you made some lifestyle changes?  Serious preppers should do it.  It's better not to need them than to figure out how to get them when times get tough. Live as prescription-free as you can.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any prescription meds that you could stop taking if you made some lifestyle changes?  Serious preppers should do it.  It's better not to need them than to figure out how to get them when times get tough. Live as prescription-free as you can.

That was something that I never thought about until I read the book, "One Second After".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


The Fine Print

Tennessee Gun Owners (TNGunOwners.com) is the premier Community and Discussion Forum for gun owners, firearm enthusiasts, sportsmen and Second Amendment proponents in the state of Tennessee and surrounding region.

TNGunOwners.com (TGO) is a presentation of Enthusiast Productions. The TGO state flag logo and the TGO tri-hole "icon" logo are trademarks of Tennessee Gun Owners. The TGO logos and all content presented on this site may not be reproduced in any form without express written permission. The opinions expressed on TGO are those of their authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the site's owners or staff.

Before engaging in any transaction of goods or services on TGO, all parties involved must know and follow the local, state and Federal laws regarding those transactions. TGO makes no claims, guarantees or assurances regarding any such transactions.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to the following.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines