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btq96r

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Here's a simple recipe to try. Everyone I know loves it.

1. Take a brisket and cold smoke it for 5-6 hours.

2, Generously onion powder, garlic powder, meat tenderizer, and McCormick's Mesquite spice.

3, Wrap it in several layers of heavy foil and slow bake it at 250 degrees until done, (5 hours or so depending on its thickness).

4. Let it rest until coming down to around 100 degrees, then unwrap it over the sink.

The brisket will be infused with smoke and spice yet so tender you can scrape the excess fat off easily. Like scrape with a butter knife easy. We like to eat it in stuffed baked potatoes. :yum:

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Reverse searing works.  Gonna keep experimenting with this technique, very easy and fun.  It wasn't as rare as shown in the pic, but it quite a good medium rare.  I'm gonna take step #3 up about five degrees next time to see how it goes.

  1. Prepped a fillet with large salt flakes and pepper grains as big as my mill would get.
  2. Put into an oven set to 325 with a thermometer in it.
  3. Cooked it to 135.
  4. Rested for 10 min wrapped in foil.
  5. Sear one minute each side in a very hot pan (this part got smokey).
  6. Sliced the weird way shown here to view how well the color was throughout the meat and lightly sprinkled on some garlic powder.
  7. Enjoyed a delicious meal.

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Edited by btq96r
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I got a sous vide unit for a present. Can’t wait to try this method out. 

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38 minutes ago, KahrMan said:

I got a sous vide unit for a present. Can’t wait to try this method out. 

It's "low and slow" brought inside.  It's worth it.

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Bit of a change to my technique as described before.  I seared first, then a "low and slow" approach (oven set to 170° until internal temp was 138°).  It worked well as you can see.

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On 2/16/2018 at 6:46 AM, Raoul said:

I learned to cook in order to pick up women. It obviously worked. I've been married 40 years and I'm still cooking.

It was easier for me to find a woman who could cook.

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Any one make their own Canadian bacon? Do you have a good recipe or method you would like to share? Pork lions are pretty cheap now. Converting a gas grill to a smoker now for hot or cold smoking. Pruned my peach trees will try peach wood for my smoking wood. 

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Another Sunday night, another steak.  This time a ribeye with a marinade, and crispy potato salad. 

The marinade was salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, smoked paprika, garlic powder, and vegetable oil.  Sat in the bag for 24 hours in the fridge before being brought out with the steak warming a room temp for 45 min after the excess oil got patted off.  After that, 8 min on each side under the high broil of my oven.  Next time I'll probably drop to 7min, 30 sec each side.  The marinade gave a nice flavorful kick, but not an overpowering one by any means.

Potato salad was just a diced up spud (skin on), par boiled then fried until crispy in some more vegetable oil.  After that, one spoon Dijon mustard, two spoons mayo, and a sprinkling of salt, pepper, smoked paprika for flavor.

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I smoked our thanksgiving turkey, a pork loin and 3 bolognas in the pouring rain Saturday. It went fine with the exception of dealing with the rain. The pork loin in particular was melt-in-your-mouth tender. 

These photos are from a year or 2 ago, but saturdays versions look the same. 

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When we got home from church Sunday afternoon, my oldest said that it still smelled like smoked meat in the house. Yeah, ain't it great? :) 

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Couldn't wait for Thursday so I cooked a turkey breast last night.

 

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Peejman spice that smoked bologna up by coring a hole down the center of the bologna and inserting a stick of Italian or your choice of smoked  sausage in it before smoking. I used a pineapple corer with the slicer removed to make the hole . If you like baked potatoes  use an apple corer to do the same thing, insert your favorite ingredients, plug the ends with the end of the removed core and bake, great potato bombs. Just pulled Canadian bacon and turkey breast off of my smoker about and hour ago. Yeah that smokey smell is lingering in the air as I type this.

Edited by owejia
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17 hours ago, owejia said:

Peejman spice that smoked bologna up by coring a hole down the center of the bologna and inserting a stick of Italian or your choice of smoked  sausage in it before smoking. I used a pineapple corer with the slicer removed to make the hole . If you like baked potatoes  use an apple corer to do the same thing, insert your favorite ingredients, plug the ends with the end of the removed core and bake, great potato bombs. Just pulled Canadian bacon and turkey breast off of my smoker about and hour ago. Yeah that smokey smell is lingering in the air as I type this.

I've done that several times in the past.  I've got a piece of stainless pipe to cut the core out. I cut 1-2" off the end of the core and save them to plug the ends. Then I take the rest of the core and put it in the food processor with whatever goodness I desire.... bbq sauce, cheese, spices, etc.  Then I fix one end plug in place with toothpicks and pack as much of the mixture back in the bologna as will fit.  I plug the other end and toss it on the smoker. If there's core mixture left over, it goes in the frying pan and makes a good snack while the smoker does it's thing.  The bologna may get rotated periodically while on the smoker, depending on what I used for stuffing. 

All that said, it was pouring rain and I just didn't feel like putting forth that effort. And my kids prefer it plain. YMMV. :) 

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