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  • 1 month later...

It is probably best to euthanize. It is a painful decision, but it often best. I just put our family cat down at eleven due to quality of life issues. It hurt, but it was best. Better than finding her a new family. We were all she had ever known. It was the most humane choice.

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1 minute ago, TGO David said:

Agree with the above.

 

Yep. I've seen older cats successfully rehomed and at one time had such rescue cat in my household. But all of these cat's were healthy and had good dispositions. It really sucks but is what it is.

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On 10/26/2016 at 11:36 AM, luke9511 said:

hey everyone, does anyone here know of a pet rescue that would take and rehome and not kill a 12-13 year old cat with diabetes?

Take in is one thing. Rehome is the hard part. I know some no kill, but they do not have a lot of foster families, so the chances are slim. Plus I am too far away.

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1 hour ago, Murgatroy said:

It is probably best to euthanize. It is a painful decision, but it often best. I just put our family cat down at eleven due to quality of life issues. It hurt, but it was best. Better than finding her a new family. We were all she had ever known. It was the most humane choice.

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we have his diabetes under control now and he is a very sweet loving cat, this is the one thing i would never do

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3 hours ago, luke9511 said:

we have his diabetes under control now and he is a very sweet loving cat, this is the one thing i would never do

See, that is a concept I don't grasp. An animal is not a human. They can't reason or understand emotion the way that a human can. Rehoming a pet is a very traumatic experience for them. Especially one with special needs and several years on them. 

Realistically, that cat will sit in a shelter for the next six months until it dies. I am being opinionated when I say this, so take this at face value. I think it is more selfish to rehome the cat, or attempt to rehome the cat, than to face the fact and put it down.

I have raised my current pack/pride from underage. Moeko came to us as a kitten. My family is all she ever knew. She lived an exceptional life. My entire family was distraught at putting her down. But we all acknowledged it was the right decision. It hurt, but it was correct. Her quality of life was miserable, and it was taking a toll on her family to keep her going. We all shed a tear when we put her down. I brought her body home and allowed the other animals of the family to see her. So they would not search endlessly for her when they realized she was missing.

I have raised Bandit from a four week old puppy. I hand fed her. I have trained her to rival trick dogs. Hand and verbal commands. Sit, stay, jump, fetch, catch, speak, shake, lay down... She is bell trained house broken, she is finger snap trained to come so an exact spot. She sleeps at my feet and understands her place in the pack hierarchy. She is three and a half years old now. I got here from here on this very forum and drove six hours roundtrip to get her. She is an exceptional dog. Exceptional. And that is said with only a modicum of pride. However, I would rather put her down than to see her suffer the pain of a shelter, of the confusion of a hasty rehoming.

Bongo, our kitten (who is a year and half old now) is in the same boat. I pulled him out from under a car at possibly three weeks old and my daughter bottle fed him for a month before he pulled through. He is as spoiled as any other member of my family. He is Bandit's best friend and most dangerous co-conspirator. Bongo is stealth and cunning, Bandit is strength and destruction. Table scraps, eyeglasses, you name it, they handle it.

Much like my wife, when I said 'till death do us part,' I meant it. Same as with my pets. Regardless of the circumstances. It is my duty as the provider to ensure they have the best possible life.

 

I am sorry for the distaste in my post, but rehoming a twelve year old diabetic cat does not speak highly to me. However, if I am missing a massive piece of the puzzle, I apologize for my vitriol. However as stated above, even with Bandit in the prime of her life, I would choose euthanasia before a shelter. It would be the merciful thing to do.

 

 

 

But remember, opinions are much like assholes, everyone has one.

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17 minutes ago, Murgatroy said:

I am sorry for the distaste in my post, but rehoming a twelve year old diabetic cat does not speak highly to me. However, if I am missing a massive piece of the puzzle, I apologize for my vitriol. However as stated above, even with Bandit in the prime of her life, I would choose euthanasia before a shelter. It would be the merciful thing to do.

 

This is wisdom born of experience and maturity.

 

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Knowing that I'm out of place and will catch hell for this, I wholeheartedly agree with Murgatroy : 

I am sorry for the distaste in my post, but rehoming a twelve year old diabetic cat does not speak highly to me. However, if I am missing a massive piece of the puzzle, I apologize for my vitriol. However as stated above, even with Bandit in the prime of her life, I would choose euthanasia before a shelter. It would be the merciful thing to do.

Assuming that said feline has been a loving part of your family for a few years, Yes it is hard waiting around for it's time to pass. BUT think if you were in it's place. Cast aside to spend what little time you have left in a cold dark place, scared and lonely, instead of the loving arms of the family that you call your own

 

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I'm pretty much with Murg...   I didn't post in this thread at first because I didn't expect my distaste for no kill shelters would go over well. 

We tried to rehome our 10 yr old, epileptic, neurotic mess of a dog when she became aggressive towards our boys.  We got her from the shelter as a very sick (likely parvo) 6 week old puppy less than 24 hrs from the gas chamber. We spent countless hours helping her adjust to us and immediate family, though she's never been particularly social.  

After she bit my older boy the 2nd time and I had to hold him down while the doc stitched him up, we started calling no kill shelters and other rehoming services. The response was shockingly cold. A couple of the replies directly stated they thought we were terrible people for even considering the idea of putting our children ahead of a dog.   To say I was disappointed doesn't remotely cover it, and my opinion of such businesses/services is impacted as you'd expect. 

So after lots of thought, dog treats, and a few tears, we've managed to get the dog and boys to co-exist relatively peacefully.  She's now 15, functionally toothless, very arthritic, and still a neurotic mess. I'm not sure how much longer she's got, and I'm glad we didn't rehome her. 

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