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billt

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About billt

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    TGO Member
  • Birthday 11/06/1952

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lake Havasu City, Arizona
  • Interests
    Guns, Shooting, Reloading
  • Occupation
    Retired Die Cast & Plastic Moldmaker - CNC Aerospace Machinist

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  • Handgun Carry Permit
    Yes
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  • NRA
    Yes

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  1. Try putting a fresh spark plug in it, and gapping it at .030. That seems to help a lot of these Poulan's start and run more reliably.
  2. I ordered some of this today. It's expensive, but it's supposed to work much better than Sta-Bil. And a 1 quart bottle treats up to 512 gallons of fuel. They say this stuff can even return bad fuel to factory refinery freshness.
  3. Most all of the problems I've seen through the years with small 2-stroke engines come from either neglect, bad fuel, or else the wrong fuel / oil mix, fouled plugs, flooding, or all of the above. With a small displacement 2-stroke, you usually get one shot at starting it. If you over choke it, you'll flood it. And once you get the plug wet, you're pretty much done, because the oil in the fuel mix won't evaporate and dry off. And with many of these engines it doesn't take much. It's why I always keep at least 2 extra spark plugs for each 2-stroke I have. It takes a bit of skill to learn how to get and keep small displacement 2-strokes running reliably. They can be a bit quirky, and every one is different. Loggers and landscapers make their living with these things. So they know what and what not to do. And they're running their own equipment day in and day out. So they know it well. But the average homeowner who runs a saw once every couple of months doesn't. That, and having the thing sitting 10 times more than it's running, doesn't help either. Most are being run on stale gas. They also require far more carburetor adjustments than a 4-cycle does. It's actually a mechanics engine, just by it's design. And I think that is why so many people have trouble with them.
  4. I heard of a trick for cleaning out neglected fuel systems on small gas engines, that I was going to attempt to use on my saw...... But fortunately didn't have to. I had heard that after washing out the tank with fresh fuel, you then fill the fuel tank with half pure Sta-Bil, plus half Chevron Fuel System Cleaner with Techron, straight from the bottle. (If it's a large tank, just add several ounces of each). This will help cut through any gum or varnish that is clogging up the carb and / or the fuel lines. After filling the tank with this mixture, put the choke on FULL, and pull the starter through 15 or 20 times to draw the mix into the lines and carburetor. The engine won't run, but this mixture over time will eventually soften up the gunk, and get it through into the engine. I knew a guy who was in no hurry, and did this over a weeks time. Every day after work, going out to the garage and pulling the starter several times. He said after a week of this, he pulled the spark plug, and he could smell the Sta-Bil and the Techron. The old spark plug was soaking wet with it. He then drained, flushed, and emptied the fuel tank again, and pulled the starter another dozen times or so to push whatever was left, out of the lines and cylinder. He then replaced the spark plug with a new one. He refilled the tank with fresh fuel, and it fired right up after just a few pulls. He said for about a minute it belched white smoke and sputtered. But once it cleared out the lines of all the cleaner, along with whatever crap was left in the system, and it started drawing fresh gas into the engine, it took off like a pimp chasing a $50 New Orleans hooker. And it's never run better. On my saw I honestly can't remember if I had used Sta-Bil or not the last time I ran it 25 odd years ago. I'm pretty sure I must have, because after over 25 years that crap would have for certain solidified in the fuel lines, and I would have had a royal mess on my hands. I normally don't neglect things like this. And from now on I'll take better care of the fuel systems on these tools. It's not that hard to do. Especially now that I'm retired. Plus, this Tru-Fuel they sell is much better than the 10% Ethanol pump gas, which starts going bad in just a few months. Plus it comes premixed to whatever fuel / oil ratio you need. If you treat the Tru-Fuel with a bit of Sta-Bil, it will last all but forever. I don't burn enough of it for the cost to be an issue.
  5. Mine is a 16" bar. (At least that's what it measures from the front of the case to the tip of the bar). Will any 16" chain fit? I'd like to get a new one.
  6. It's has been sitting on the shelf for the last 25 years, collecting dirt and dust. These were well made saws. Constructed of all powder coated Aluminum, with very little plastic. And good, strong running engines. So this morning I decided I would try to get it running again. It's been a good saw, but has been badly neglected. And I felt bad about it. So the first thing I did was open the fuel cap and turn the unit upside down. I thought it was empty, then after about 10 seconds this vile thick snot like substance came running out. It resembled a slimy 90W gear oil. Most likely it's what was left over after what gas was in the tank evaporated over the last 25 years... Yecch! I filled the fuel tank about half full of fresh 40-1 Tru-Fuel Mix, and swished it around, and let it soak up and absorb whatever assorted crap was left in the tank, while I washed the unit down with some clean Kerosene. And then I blew it all off with compressed air. I wiped it down and detailed it a bit with some WD-40 and a clean, soft cloth. It cleaned up really nice. After I got it all nice and clean, I pulled the plug and replaced it with a new one. Then I drained the fuel tank again, and filled it with fresh 40-1 Tru-Fuel, with some Sta-Bil added to it. Along with about a tablespoon full of some fresh Husqvarna Synthetic Blend 2-Stroke Oil, to richen up the mixture a bit. (I was able to find the operators manual on line. And Homelite say's it should run on a 32-1 mixture of gas and oil). I oiled and adjusted the chain, and drained and filled the bar oil tank with some fresh Mobil 1, 10W-40 I had laying around. I really didn't expect it to start. But after a couple of pulls with the choke on, I switched it off, held the throttle wide open, gave it a yank, and it fired right up after the third pull! I was shocked! It stumbled and smoked a bit until it burned all the crap "fuel" out of the lines and carburetor. Then I let it idle for a few minutes to warm up, while goosing the throttle to draw more of the fresh fuel through the lines, and into the carb. Now at full throttle it really screams! To be honest, it's the best I ever remember it running. I let it get good and warmed up, and all total I burned through about a third of a tank of the fresh, Sta-Bil treated Tru-Fuel. So now she's good to go. I hate neglecting power equipment. And I thought for sure I was going to have to pull the carburetor off this thing, and soak it. Especially after seeing that nasty crap that drained out of the fuel tank. But she fired right up, saving me a lot of aggravation. So now between this and my old Honda generator, along with my brand new Echo 8010-T power blower, and my Simpson / Kohler Power Washer, I've got everything all freshly fueled and running like Rolex's. I feel a lot better now!
  7. I think I paid right around $700.00 for all of this back when I bought it some years back. 2 cases of 7.62 X 39 MM. And 2 cases of 7.62 X 54 MM. And that was for the 5 Romanian Drum Mags as well. All that stuff is sky high now.... Assuming you can even find it.
  8. Perhaps that is exactly what it was designed to do. Remember, these places have been sitting on major stockpiles of cheap guns and ammo, ever since Trump beat the pants suit off Hillary over 3 years ago. I can't think of a better way to move it all.... And at a tidy profit as well.
  9. Another thing is people refuse to apply common sense. There is a delicate balance here. For example, doctors have said repeatedly that it serves no purpose to wear a mask, unless you're already sick. Yet I was in the local grocery store and saw countless people wearing them. Then we wonder why there is a shortage of them? I went to fuel up my vehicles yesterday, and the guy at the counter had a bucket full of something that he was washing his hands in after he waited on every person. This crap was dripping everywhere, all over the floor and counter. And he was taking so long to do it, the line was backing up with customers, exposing more people to each other. If he was so damn worried, all he had to do was wear a pair of rubber gloves. The fact is well meaning people are running around scared, and they're NOT making wise decisions in their actions. My grocery store said they were, "conserving plastic bags". For what, I have no idea. You either have bags, or you don't. So I had to wait, again as the line backed up with people standing next to each other, all breathing down each others neck, while she hunted around for a box to put my food in. This is just plain stupid, people. It is accomplishing nothing. If anything it's making matters worse. The biggest thing that seems to be contagious about this virus, is how idiotic it is making people think and act.... And I live in a sleepy little desert town of 50,000 people, that has not has a single reported case. Common sense is no longer common, that's for damn sure!
  10. This all reminds me of the 5 year long .22 ammo shortage, that all started with the Sandy Hook shooting. Every day you had all of these old, bored retired guys waiting in line at the sporting goods counter at their local Wal-Mart. All waiting to buy their daily allotment of 2 bricks of .22 ammo. They were all either stockpiling it in their basements. Or else reselling it at gun shows and swap meets for triple what they paid for it. Now there's .22 ammo up the wazoo... Or at least was until this insanity started. It's not the Coronavirus that scares me. It's all the idiots responding to it with their lunatic mentality. This morning I was going to go to Wal-Mart to pick up a few things. I got there 3 or 4 minutes before they opened at 7:00 AM, and they were lined up around the store. I made a U-Turn and went home. I don't need to put up with that silly bull$h!t. Fist fights over toilet paper? They're all nuts! I told my wife to start ordering that kind of stuff on line. I don't care if it costs more, or if I have to pay shipping. It's better than shopping with a bunch of crazy idiots.
  11. You know what? I used to be one of those people who was all over CTD every time they did this. But no longer. I don't blame them. Not one bit. If the public is stupid enough to act this way, then they deserve it. Seriously. And they've done it several times in the last decade regarding guns and ammunition. Starting way back when Obama got elected, and several times since. Time after time they do nothing until something like this happens, then run out in a panic and decide to buy. Not a single ounce of foresight, or common sense among the whole idiotic bunch. So the hell with them. They're ripe for picking, and they all deserve to be picked clean. They all seem to make a profession out of acting like unprepared fools. CTD simply proves it. And why shouldn't they? These nit wits don't deserve a break. They live their lives in a cloud of ignorance, then start running around in a blind panic, screaming at the sky as soon as something gets the slightest bit out of whack. Guns, ammo, magazines were all quite literally, "dirt cheap", ever since Trump won the election. Did they buy when all of these good prices and selection were available? No. So then let the stupid idiots pay through the nose now. I no longer look at it as, "price gouging". I see it as idiots paying what they deserve to pay, for exercising their right to be idiots. The old saying is as true today, as it was long ago. "Run with the sheep, and you will be slaughtered".
  12. People are complete idiots. Ever since Trump won the election, guns and ammo have been cheap, and plentiful as dirt. Did they take advantage of the supply and cheap prices? Hell, no. They all waited, and now they're all running over each other, emptying the shelves of everything. Idiots all!
  13. billt

    Ruger 57

    The Ruger is realistically priced. (As most Rugers are). The FN is overpriced. (As most FN's are). Game, set, and match Ruger.
  14. Politics aside, Turkey makes some nice guns. I believe all of the Weatherby O/U's are Turkish made. As are many others. They have some of the finest manufacturing centers in the world. And they have some very talented people as well. Not everyone who builds guns in Turkey has oily skin and smells.
  15. $330.00 for an all steel .45 ACP pistol is outstanding in today's market. The Tisas Regent Hi-Power clone is every bit as impressive. Tisas is going to give Armscor, (Rock Island Armory), a run for their money in the low cost 1911 market, that's for sure.

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