Jump to content

Predator hunting tactics/tricks sharing


Recommended Posts

I am starting this thread to see if we can share some of our tactics and follies with each other so that we can hopefully increase each others odds at being successful. I know there are many forums out there that this sort of thing is already being discussed at, but I can only handle being a member of so many forums and I like TGO. Also this might be a good place to ask specific questions and get answers on what and what not to do to get-r-done with being specific to TN predator hunting.

Maybe if this thread gets some traffic the hunting Mods might make it a sticky :shrug:.

Link to post
  • Replies 112
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Hunting 101, thanks for the invite. Once I get out of West TN for good (5 more weeks) and get settled into a routine at home I may just take you up on that.

I'll take a stab at it....

What sound combinations seem to work best for you to attract your query? Any sequence you like in particular?

Do you change it up quickly or just pick one and let it loop/repeat for a given amount of time till the set-up is a bust?

How long do you give each set-up to produce before packing it in?

I've been pondering this one on every set-up I've been on....do you like the openness of fields or do you prefer to get into the woods? Which one has paid off better?

So far I have not seen a yote (which is what I'm mainly gunning for) at any time of the day but dusk. Anyone finding the same results?

Link to post
Guest woodlawnhunter
I'll take a stab at it....

What sound combinations seem to work best for you to attract your query? Any sequence you like in particular?

Do you change it up quickly or just pick one and let it loop/repeat for a given amount of time till the set-up is a bust?

How long do you give each set-up to produce before packing it in?

I've been pondering this one on every set-up I've been on....do you like the openness of fields or do you prefer to get into the woods? Which one has paid off better?

So far I have not seen a yote (which is what I'm mainly gunning for) at any time of the day but dusk. Anyone finding the same results?

depends on time of year,soon we will be switching to pup in distress and fawn bleats,we like using 1 or 2 sounds at a time ,use rabbit and squirell in distress often.for cats we use female in heat.we will call off and on for about 10 minutes with varying levels of volume ,if nothing we move on.

we prefer fields as it gives you more time to pick the shot.woods works but sometimes you don't see them until too late and shotgun works good in timber.For cats we use the woods or woodline as they like to stay concealed , a lot of times you will never know they are there until they bust you.early morn and late evening is best ,it is when they are the most activly hunting for food ,in NY night is best but illegal here.We found the best tactic is to get in to your set very stealthy ,paying attention to the wind direction and always have a back drop or be in the shadows.We also use a homemade weasel ball on a wire for decoy and foxpro spitfire.guns we use are savage 10 predator and AR15 ,both in .223

Link to post
Guest woodlawnhunter

also , watch predator quest etc as they will give good examples. granted they edit a lot but gives you a chance to see how they set up,we also use fox urine covor scent and leafy suit for concealment.Don't expect to see 1 all the time .we have had days with multiple sets with no action just as it is with any hunting.If you have places down that way and want to go on a weekend ,give us a holler .Now be careful as they will get smart to a call, or repitition of them .They are a crafty animal ,but when you have 4 or 5 come in at a time it is a adrenalin rush which ends in seconds

Link to post

First thing to do is scout and see if you can see any sign of a coyote. If you find a place with lots of sign then try and figure out a travel pattern. I like to setup just a little of the trail or road. I usually start a stand with some type of distress call. If an area has been called and pressured I usually use bird or jackrabbit distress. We don't have jackrabbits but it's something they may never have heard before and it could peak their curiosity. I usually call for 3 to 5 minutes and pause for about the same. Don't be scared to try different calls on one stand. I usually stay on a stand for around 30 minutes, as it could take a coyote that long to get to you. During bobcat season I will stay on a stand for up to an hour, do not over call when staying this long. The reason I stay that long is a bobcat (most of the time) will not just run in. They rely mostly on sight and will stay hidden for long periods of time before they feel it's safe to make their move. For bobcat I usually stick to bird sounds as I have killed many more bobcats with these sounds. Distress sounds work all year long, especially good during the cold winter months as they need to eat to keep their body temps up. During the months of January and February coyotes are looking to pair up and breed. I will use coyote vocals like a challenge howl, female whimpers and female invitation howls. During this time the females will try and find a den sight to raise her pups. Coyotes don't live in dens all year round, they bed in thick brush, tall grasses and in cedar thickets. When calling don't use the same sound routine as you did the previous times. Some people say always end a stand with a hurt pup distress or similiar, but coyotes will catch on and become "call shy". I used to make this mistake but through trial and error I have learned better. I have found the best times to hunt coyotes is 30 minutes after daylight. The coyotes are going to their bedding area and when you setup and start calling they "feel" more comfortable going back to the area they just came from. I do hunt in the evenings but you can run the risk of educating them to the call. I remember calling just before dark and had a coyote howling back at me. It became to dark to hunt so I had to leave. As I got around 100 yards from my setup I heard the dang thing howl and bark. He came to the stand after dark and after I had already left. During the winter months I will call all day long especially if it is cold with an overcast. During the summer months I like to hunt as close to water as I can and use distress calls. Late August and into September is when I will use the pup distress more as the young coyotes will come out of the den and if a female/male coyote hears it they think their pup is in danger and will protect it. Young coyotes are easier to call as they are still "green" or dumb and aren't yet educated. I will also use fawn distress calls (I also use them in the spring). When it comes to the wind I try and stay down wind of my call and with the sun in my back. If the wind is not right and I can't make another setup on the property I will not call. I will leave and call another day in that area. Most important is to have patience and keep at it. Coyote hunting can be one of the most frustrating and most rewarding hunting sport out there. I could go on and on but I guess I have rambled to much.

Link to post

I'm glad this one was started. I have been doing this for a year and I'll have to say it's about the hardest thing I ever tried to do. I guess I could tell what not to do than what to do. I have called in two coyotes (that I saw) and did not get either one. One figured out something was not right and bolted as I was pulling the trigger and the other one I was complety exposed to him. On that one I chose not to move or I would have been busted for sure. I watched him for ten minutes hoping he would turn away so I could turn around for a shot but he finally left. I will say it is exciting when I call one in even if I don't get him. I did get a get a fox last winter but I really want to get a coyote.

Link to post

Hunting101, you say you like to be downwind of your E-call. Have you not found that the game comes from that way often? I know I said TN specific but the game coming from downwind is/was the norm out in eastern CO's open country. I try to get off to the left or right of the E-calls placement to give a downwind approach from the game a chance.

Thanks for you lengthy post. Thats exactly what I hoped for in creating this thread.

Oh yeah, the Owl population is in good shape up here in Robertson Co. I might have to stake down my E-call next time I go out. :)

Link to post
Boatman your more than welcome to come hunt with me and we can try and get you one.

Hunting 101, thanks for the invite. Once I get out of West TN for good (5 more weeks) and get settled into a routine at home I may just take you up on that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Hunting101, you say you like to be downwind of your E-call. Have you not found that the game comes from that way often? I know I said TN specific but the game coming from downwind is/was the norm out in eastern CO's open country. I try to get off to the left or right of the E-calls placement to give a downwind approach from the game a chance.

Thanks for you lengthy post. Thats exactly what I hoped for in creating this thread.

Oh yeah, the Owl population is in good shape up here in Robertson Co. I might have to stake down my E-call next time I go out. :)

Setup to where if the coyote circles downwind he will have to expose himself.

Link to post

I like to add the crow feeding frenzy to my E calling, in conjunction with whatever dying critter I'm using at the time.

It tend's to relax the coyote, and give him confidence; since they know the crow's are wary and watchful, plus they don't want the crow's to delight in the newly aquired meal.

I will also use the rustling leaves on my E call, and overlap it into my dying critter call; simulates a critter thrashing about on the ground with possibly another predator, and trying it's best to escape.

I don't employ these call tactic's every time, but just when I feel the setup needs a little something "extra" to make it more believable to the quarry I'm hunting.

Link to post
Guest woodlawnhunter

we are headed out at 3 to get a set in before the weekend ends.no wind , and neighbor called to ask us to take some that have been in the herd with his cows ,will let you know how we make out.had to make a new decoy .try explaining to your daughter why you need a weasel ball toy from Cracker barrel , is halarious

Link to post

Got another question,

How do you guys view volume? Understanding that each set up will be different....what volume level do you start out with with either E or hand/mouth calls for dog/cat? I'm wondering if I start my E-call out on the higher volume settings I'm running stuff out of the county. Also do you change volume during the set?

I'm loving the snow BTW.

Link to post

I like to use start out low and then increase the volume over time. I also lower and raise the volume when I am calling. It kinda simulates a wounded animal with the different sound pitch's.

Link to post

I was thinking about trying to bow hunt coyote, has anyone ever tried this.

I don't know a thing about hunting them but these thread is helping, thanks!

I was thinking about trying it from a ground blind. Would I have a chance trying that one?

I'd be hunting on public land so I'm sure that will make it more difficult.

If I'd be wasting my time let me know, if you have any suggestions I'm open to them..

Link to post

I have hunted them with a crossbow. I wouldn't use a ground blind. I just set up as if I have a rifle. As long as the public land is not over hunted for coyotes you should be fine.

Link to post

If the admins want to move this out of this thread please do.

---------

Being a Predator newbie I just want to make sure this is a Coyote track.

One of the areas I hunt has a lot of these in different areas, I've hunted the area a lot and never seen any dogs so I'm going on the assumption it's a coyote.

The tracks are bigger than I expected that's why I question it.

am I wrong?

IMG_0760.jpg

Edited by clutepc
Link to post

It looks like a coyote track. If you find more look at the track pattern. A coyote's track will be straight there back paws will leave a track right in front of the front paw track. A dogs track will be side by side.

Link to post
I like to add the crow feeding frenzy to my E calling, in conjunction with whatever dying critter I'm using at the time.

It tend's to relax the coyote, and give him confidence; since they know the crow's are wary and watchful, plus they don't want the crow's to delight in the newly aquired meal.

I will also use the rustling leaves on my E call, and overlap it into my dying critter call; simulates a critter thrashing about on the ground with possibly another predator, and trying it's best to escape.

I don't employ these call tactic's every time, but just when I feel the setup needs a little something "extra" to make it more believable to the quarry I'm hunting.

What e-caller do you have?

Link to post
What e-caller do you have?

I'm currently using the Extreme Dimension Phantom predator wireless unit. I like the ease of changing out the sound modules.

They have whitetail, elk, moose, bear, predator, turkey (illegal in TN.) and also goose and crow, IIRC.

Link to post
I'm currently using the Extreme Dimension Phantom predator wireless unit. I like the ease of changing out the sound modules.

They have whitetail, elk, moose, bear, predator, turkey (illegal in TN.) and also goose and crow, IIRC.

The reason I asked if you had a foxpro I have over 150 sounds we could share.

Link to post
There were multiple tracks all in this area almost like they were circling but maybe you can tell with this one.

There is also a deer track crossing the middle of them.

IMG_0759.jpg

You can see how the tracks are in a row. I'm going to say it's coyote.

Link to post

I've never seen a coyote den. Either here in TN or back in WY/CO. Is this one? And what would you do about it. Back off and hunt it when the time is right(if not now) ? This is the second one I have seen in a few outings. Both of these photos are the same den. There seems to be quite a bit of tracks around this thing. So much in fact that I can't pick out a single one. They all blend so to speak. So as Hunting101 mentioned..."They don't always live in dens" para phrased. So when do they? Do they come back to the same one over and over or dig a new each year? Are they mating now?

0129111650.jpg

0129111652.jpg

Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

THE FINE PRINT

Tennessee Gun Owners (TNGunOwners.com) is the premier Community and Discussion Forum for gun owners, firearm enthusiasts, sportsmen and Second Amendment proponents in the state of Tennessee and surrounding region.

TNGunOwners.com (TGO) is a presentation of Enthusiast Productions. The TGO state flag logo and the TGO tri-hole "icon" logo are trademarks of Tennessee Gun Owners. The TGO logos and all content presented on this site may not be reproduced in any form without express written permission. The opinions expressed on TGO are those of their authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the site's owners or staff.

Before engaging in any transaction of goods or services on TGO, all parties involved must know and follow the local, state and Federal laws regarding those transactions. TGO makes no claims, guarantees or assurances regarding any such transactions.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to the following.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines
 
We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.