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Guest m7cjk

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Guest m7cjk

I was sorting brass today and i came across of course 380 auto then in the same size case i found a shell the same size as the 380 auto but it says 9mm on it ????

help me out !:D

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if its a makarov it will usually say 9mm M, 9x18, or 9mm Mak on the stamp, but not always. Be aware that reloaders often cut down 9x19 to 9x18 so you occasionally find a "funny short luger" because its a 9mm headstamp.Its easy to tell 380 from mak. 380 brass is much, much thinner and lighter. Mak is as thick and heavy as a regular 9mm case. Or you can measure it. They are a full mm apart so even a roughly treated case should be close to its desired length. You cannot load a 9x18 as 9x17 (380), the bullet seating is all wrong and it probably will not chamber etc, and the mak is at least .1 if not .2 mm wider so the bullet will not seat well without a very heavy crimp... all the way around it would be a poor fit and for "emergency use only", if that.

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Guest m7cjk

So if its a 380 why would it say 9mm on it?

Im not trying to use it just mostly trying to understand the differences knowledge is power is what ive always heard.

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Guest m7cjk
Sounds like Sellier & Bellot 9mm Browning (.380)

So far this sounds like the answer but im one of those kind of people thinking (but why would they do this) just to be different i guess

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So if its a 380 why would it say 9mm on it?

Im not trying to use it just mostly trying to understand the differences knowledge is power is what ive always heard.

Well, you see, most of the rest of the world is on the metric system so measure of caliber in fractions of an inch wouldnt make a lot of sense to anyone outside the USA. Therefore they use mm instead in many other countries. Thats really the main reason.

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Hi m7cjk

Your question was answered very well. I will be Captain Obvious by also pointing out that you can load 9mm bullets in .380 cases and vice-versa. They are interchangeable. The jacketed bullets for either are usually 0.355" diameter.

The cases have several different dimensions, but not the bullets.

Of course typical .380 bullets are lighter and would be a fast round in a 9mm. And of course typical 9mm bullets are heavier and would be a slow round in a .380. And one would have to take care to get the powder and OAL correct to get good safe performance. But the bullets are mechanically interchangeable anyway.

====

I have found some of the S&B cases more difficult to reload.

The base of some of the 9mm and .380 S&B brass has a visually noticeable slightly different shape than the USA or Korean PMC stuff. It seems to work good enough in pistols, but the base isn't shaped quite the same. Maybe not all S&B has this different shape, but I've seen some that look different.

I have wondered if one reason the S&B seems more problematic to reload is that the slightly-different-shaped base doesn't fit the same in the shellholder for reloading?

Have noticed more trouble seating primers in the .380 and 9mm S&B. Reaming out the primer pocket with a uniformer tool takes more metal out of an S&B primer pocket than from the typical USA brass. But even after uniforming the primer pocket, it is still a little more trouble getting the primers to seat in S&B and sometimes I toss one that just won't seat at all. That is why was wondering if the S&B might not fit my shellholders quite as well.

Sometimes I just discard the S&B brass to avoid the hassle, and other times I'll use it anyway, and then occasionally cuss at it.

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Many older cartridges have a variety of names. The cartridge you are referring to is the .380 Automatic Colt Pistol in the US. Most US publications shorten that to '.380acp' or just '.380'. But in Britain, a '.380' refers to the British service pistol cartridge used in WWII. In the US, that cartridge is called the .38S&W.

The name '9mm Court is French for 9mm short. In Italian it's 9mm Corto. Most of Europe refers to the .380acp as the 9mm Browning Short as it was introduced over there in the FN Browning model 1910 and model 1922 pistols.

If you REALLY want to have fun with names, try to find ALL of the different names for what we normally call 9mm Luger. I'll start:

9x19mm

9mm Parabellum (sometimes shortened to '9mmPara')

9mm NATO

9mm Grande Puissance (short version is 'GP')

9mm Browning (how's that for causing confusion!)

So, if there is a 9mm Browning Short, is there a 9mm Browning Long? First person to post the most common weapon chambered for it, and what the cartridge is called in that country wins a genuine 2-second smile of admiration. No cheating with an internet search!

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So, if there is a 9mm Browning Short, is there a 9mm Browning Long? First person to post the most common weapon chambered for it, and what the cartridge is called in that country wins a genuine 2-second smile of admiration. No cheating with an internet search!

Maybe there is another one, but without internet cheating, I recall a 9X21. Memory says that 9X21 is the "civilian" round in Italy because for some strange reason Italy doesn't want civilians using 9X19 military caliber, though 9X21 is most likely a more potent round than 9X19.

One time I bought a Beretta 92 factory competition barrel with beautiful ported-threaded aluminum profile barrel extension cheap at a gun show. Just a beautiful hunk of metal. It made the Beretta 92 look like a 7" barrel ported race gun.

Unfortunately, it was chambered in 9X21. Dunno how the seemingly new part made it from italy to a gun show in TN.

Could have set up to reload 9X21, but it wasn't worth the trouble.

Maybe I'm remembering that all wrong.

Edited by Lester Weevils
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