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My boss is trying to sell some rifles he inherited, and I've found an Enfield No.1 Mk.III that I may be interested in trying to buy and restore. I've asked around on a few different Enfield forums and have come up with a variety of different values and guesstimates as to how much it's worth on its current condition. The Markings are very worn (so much so that its hard to even know the year) but someone else said it seemed to be either a 1915 or 1916. There are some missing pieces (rear handguard), and some broken pieces as well (front handguard by the bolt). I've got a few pictures and can get a few more if need be. I'm just trying to find out a little more info about the rifle, and what it might take to restore it a little. He's supposed to be getting them appraised soon, but until then, I have no idea what kind of money to offer him for one in this condition.

 

 

foregrip1.jpg

smle.jpg

smle1.jpg

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The rear handguard and broken forearm will cost about $140 to replace if you get them from here:   https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewcategories.asp?idCategory=62   and then it might be the devil to get all the wood to match.  The forearm could be repaired if you were so inclined and had the talent to so so.

Considering that and assuming it is all matching numbers with good bore condition I wouldn't pay too much more than $250 as it is, or at least try not too.  That's just my opinion.  But if it's the boss I would through a few extra $$ at it, you know, to promote a harmonious work environment.

Edited by Garufa
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25 minutes ago, Garufa said:

The rear handguard and broken forearm will cost about $140 to replace if you get them from here:   https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewcategories.asp?idCategory=62   and then it might be the devil to get all the wood to match.  The forearm could be repaired if you were so inclined and had the talent to so so.

Considering that and assuming it is all matching numbers with good bore condition I wouldn't pay too much more than $250 as it is, or at least try not too.  That's just my opinion.  But if it's the boss I would through a few extra $$ at it, you know, to promote a harmonious work environment.

Technically they're my boss's uncle's guns, but he's trying to sell them for him. He doesn't really care too much what he gets from them.  Said he'll sell em to me for about $100 less than what they appraise for. It's not a matching numbers gun, unfortunately. I assume that comes from the FTR mark, but I'm not terribly worried about matching numbers if I can get it for ~$100. He had several other guns, but this one would definitely come out as the cheapest (but most interesting to me). My ideal Enfield is a No.4 Mk.1, but for $100, I'll take a No.1 Mk.III with some history behind it

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8 minutes ago, Wilson002s said:

Technically they're my boss's uncle's guns, but he's trying to sell them for him. He doesn't really care too much what he gets from them.  Said he'll sell em to me for about $100 less than what they appraise for. It's not a matching numbers gun, unfortunately. I assume that comes from the FTR mark, but I'm not terribly worried about matching numbers if I can get it for ~$100. He had several other guns, but this one would definitely come out as the cheapest (but most interesting to me). My ideal Enfield is a No.4 Mk.1, but for $100, I'll take a No.1 Mk.III with some history behind it

Yeah, non matching numbers bring it down even more.  If you can get it for $100, that's a good price that you can feel comfortable paying.  They're great, soft-shooting rifles.  Plenty of No. 4 , Mk. 1's still out there too add later.  For it's age it looks in pretty good shape otherwise, many WWI vintage Enfields are beat all to hell.

Edited by Garufa
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That looks in pretty good shape other than the furniture issues. I think $100 would be a very good price, but any price up to $200 would still be fair. Good luck with the purchase...Enfields are addictive...you can't have just one.


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You did not mention bore condition.  If the rifling is still pretty clear and the bore doesn't show pits or corrosion, I'd agree with $150-200.

Also look for pitting on the bolt face.  All other defects can be solved at reasonable cost.  Barrels are a real pain to replace, especially on the WW1 years.

BTW, Tennessee troops of the 30th Infantry division were issued SMLEs in France.

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1 hour ago, 1gewehr said:

You did not mention bore condition.  If the rifling is still pretty clear and the bore doesn't show pits or corrosion, I'd agree with $150-200.

Also look for pitting on the bolt face.  All other defects can be solved at reasonable cost.  Barrels are a real pain to replace, especially on the WW1 years.

BTW, Tennessee troops of the 30th Infantry division were issued SMLEs in France.

I took the bolt out last night and tried to peek at the bore. It was dirty, but I didn't see any kind of severe pitting. I'll let you guys know if I end up picking it up! Thank you for all the info

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