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Trying to identify Arisaka....NOT FOR SALE!


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Posted (edited)

Neighbors son brought this by today.  Says his Uncle was in WWII and got this from one of the Pacific Island Campaigns.  Has never been looked at by anyone, a wall hanger.

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Additional markings as in following pictures.:

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He originally thought it was a type 38 training rifle.  I am in no way a collector or expert, however according to Forgotten Weapons video those were either rimfire or chambered for blanks.  This has a regular bolt/chamber/rifled barrel.  So is it a type 99 in carbine length (39")

Any idea what it is or who might be qualified to look at it.  His goal is to preserve its collectablity.  Wanted to clean it but it is surprisingly clean and told him just to rub it with an oily rag for now.

 

OH, AND LET ME ADD....THANKS TO ALL THOSE WHO SERVED AND WHOM NOW SERVE!!!

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Edited by JustEd
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Posted (edited)

It is a Type 44 carbine, a variation of the Type 38 rifle.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_44_carbine

Looks like it is in excellent condition.  If it hasn't been goobered with since it's liberation in the Pacific and is still in the original 6.5 x 50mm caliber, I'd try to find some ammo and shoot it.  Arisakas are known as some of the strongest bolt-action military rifles ever used.

Graf's has some ammo in stock now.....https://www.grafs.com/catalog/category/categoryId/164

Steinel  is another source for this not easy to find caliber, but they are on backorder....https://www.steinelammo.com/product/6-5-x-50mm-sr-arisaka-140gr-sp/

As for care, just keep the steel oiled up and it should be fine for a long time to come.

Edited by Garufa
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50 minutes ago, gregintenn said:

The Arisakas were quality rifles in my opinion. Waaaaaaaaaaay ahead of the Italian Carcanos of the day.

In all fairness, it wasn't really necessary fr the Italians to spend the resources to develop quality firearms during WWII.  After all, the majority of their weapons were going to be discarded quickly, thrown into the mud as their soldiers threw up their hands and surrendered to the first enemy combatants they faced ...

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11 minutes ago, No_0ne said:

In all fairness, it wasn't really necessary fr the Italians to spend the resources to develop quality firearms during WWII.  After all, the majority of their weapons were going to be discarded quickly, thrown into the mud as their soldiers threw up their hands and surrendered to the first enemy combatants they faced ...

I thought that was the French plan.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, gregintenn said:

The Arisakas were quality rifles in my opinion. Waaaaaaaaaaay ahead of the Italian Carcanos of the day.

Fun fact:  The Italians produced rifles for the Japanese during WWII.  Those are known as Type I’s and are basically Carcanos that look kinda like Type 38’s.

Edited by Garufa
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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, gregintenn said:

I thought that was the French plan.

I'm not sure which country pioneered this strategy first, but both quickly mastered it.  I've always thought it would have been interesting to see French forces take on an Italian army, without interference from allies who actually fought ...

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Edited by No_0ne
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1 hour ago, Garufa said:

Fun fact:  The Italians produced rifles for the Japanese during WWII.  Those are known as Type I’s and are basically Carcanos that look kinda like Type 38’s.

I did not know this. My hat’s off to you sir.

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48 minutes ago, gregintenn said:

I did not know this. My hat’s off to you sir.

I know this because growing up in Memphis my best friend’s dad had one.  He was in the Navy during WWII and brought it back from the Pacific.  It was the “secret” Jap rifle as they had no markings other than a serial #.

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I love the folding bayonet on these. Very collectible rifle. A friend of mine has one of these that his father sporterised years ago. I know, so sad. He cut the bayonet off and cut the stock down. It’s still a great shooter though. 

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Thanks guys, that answers my question. He would like to find someone in the Chattanooga area to clean it up. Personally I would just run a patch down the barrel and wipe it down

Anyone recommend someone? 

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23 hours ago, JustEd said:

Thanks guys, that answers my question. He would like to find someone in the Chattanooga area to clean it up. Personally I would just run a patch down the barrel and wipe it down

Anyone recommend someone? 

I'm sure you could find a gunsmith that would happily take his money, but it ain't that hard to clean a bolt action rifle yourself.

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I cringe whenever I hear someone adamant on “cleaning up” an old milsurp even when there is no reason to, especially one as valuable as this.  It usually involves screwing with the stock hoping to make it look brand new. Big, big mistake.

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I think his motivation is that it is a family heirloom and wants to preserve it.  Doesn’t know how himself. Thought my suggestion of swabbing the bore and a lightly oiled rag on the outside was not worthy enough 🙄

He asked if I know someone so I asked here.  

Gosh, I wish I had gotten an image of that beautiful bore..oh well.

 

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28 minutes ago, Garufa said:

I cringe whenever I hear someone adamant on “cleaning up” an old milsurp even when there is no reason to, especially one as valuable as this.  It usually involves screwing with the stock hoping to make it look brand new. Big, big mistake.

image.png.98b5dfd2d63897f25ee9fc50719ccb2b.png

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Oh, I did tell him to write down its history, provenience. along with supporting letters docs. Possibly it is not worth that effort though 

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Should show him this thread and the folks saying don’t futz with it just keep it oils and rust free. Maybe he will come to his senses and not have anybody mess with it.

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Posted (edited)

@JustEd If preservation is all that he wants tell him to go to Woodcraft down there and get some Renaissance Wax.  It is also available online from a couple of places including MidwayUSA.  

Not cheap but is widely used by collectors.  It’s used in museums and was in fact developed by the British Museum.

if it were me, I’d figure out how to get the stock off and give the undercarriage a good inspection, cleanup, and waxing.  Put it back together and do the outside.

It’s going to be hard to find a gunsmith capable of properly caring for old rifles such as this in one specific area, IMHO.  Maybe he’ll get lucky,

It sure looks like someone’s been taking care of it all these years.  What have they been doing?

Edited by Garufa
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