Welcome to TNGunOwners.com

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to contribute to this site by submitting your own content or replying to existing content. You'll be able to customize your profile, receive reputation points as a reward for submitting content, while also communicating with other members via your own private inbox, plus much more! This message will be removed once you have signed in.

Cherokee Slim

3 Shot Burst, But How?

29 posts in this topic
33 minutes ago, btq96r said:

 


While all the USMC units I've seen have been frugal and make the most of what they get (sometimes past the point of common sense), the Corps as a service also greatly benefits from having the Army being the lead proponent for research and development costs for shared items like weapons, vehicles, artillery systems, and other big ticket items that get rolled into the Army budgets. The Marines also save big time on paper with their size of their force being a fraction of the Army...one thing that rarely gets discussed is how personnel and family support costs are almost 50% of the total DoD budget.

Regardless, we're certainly getting our money's worth from the Corps.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk just to give Oh Shoot something to be grumpy about.
 

 

The Marine Corps gets their budget through the Navy and subsequently are sucking hind teat: therefore, they have to be smart with their money. The difference is clearly evident in something as inane as the chow hall. When I went to Tactical Nuclear Weapons School on Coronado I thought I was dreaming upon seeing steak and lobster on the menu. The only time that you saw steak in a Marine Corps' chow hall was on the Marine Corps Birthday, and you'd never see lobster.

In 1983, my 3rd 8" Howitzer Battery tested the red bag powder and ICM for the Army R&D. We had to use a 50' lanyard because they didn't know whether the hydraulics could handle the recoil of the new powder. One would think that the Army preferred to blow up a Marine Corps howitzer rather their own, but it actually made financial sense. The gun range at 29 Palms was the largest, and it's better to damage equipment that's already there than to transport equipment there to destroy. It was all good because the hydraulics held up just fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, SWJewellTN said:

We had to use a 50' lanyard because they didn't know whether the hydraulics could handle the recoil of the new powder.

That's one of those military moments where you can hear the Looney Tunes theme playing in your head as you do what you're told.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got to see the box, never the equipment or lanyard but we had a "special" box for the M198's in our unit in Korea.  I heard the lanyard was longer than 50 feet.  And you had to be in a hole with so much earth or stone between you to pull it.....

I was they guy that snapped a cookie and told em if they were ever gonna have to pull it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, btq96r said:

That's one of those military moments where you can hear the Looney Tunes theme playing in your head as you do what you're told.

LOL!

My thought was, what good would it do you to have a 50' lanyard when the 18,000 lbs tube came flying back at you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

Connect With Us

The Fine Print

Tennessee Gun Owners (TNGunOwners.com) is the premier Community and Discussion Forum for gun owners, firearm enthusiasts, sportsmen and Second Amendment proponents in the state of Tennessee and surrounding region.
TNGunOwners.com (TGO) is a presentation of Enthusiast Productions. The TGO state flag logo and the TGO tri-hole "icon" logo are trademarks of Tennessee Gun Owners. The TGO logos and all content presented on this site may not be reproduced in any form without express written permission. The opinions expressed on TGO are those of their authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the site's owners or staff.
Before engaging in any transaction of goods or services on TGO, all parties involved must know and follow the local, state and Federal laws regarding those transactions. TGO makes no claims, guarantees or assurances regarding any such transactions.