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jgradyc

Night scope for coyotes

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Coyotes have taken a few pets in my area and recently gave us a real scare with our cat.  I'm not a hunter nor do I like to hunt, but I've been told by local animal control that I can shoot them on my land. I've only seen them at dusk or just after dark. My question is how can I see them at 100-200 yards in low light? We occasionally have loose dogs that wander around so I have to see clearly enough to distinguish between a dog and a coyote. I just looked into night scopes and was shocked to see prices in the $2,500 range. That's way outside my budget.

My questions are 1) how can I see them 2) where can I learn the basics of coyote hunting 3) how do I ensure I don't break any TN laws. (All my neighbors support this, by the way.)

Edited by jgradyc

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Unfortunately, hunting after dark is illegal in Tennessee. You are allowed to shoot them up to 30 minutes after sunset if I recall the regulations. Check here to make sure you keep it between the lines:   https://www.tn.gov/twra/hunting.html

Generally coyote hunting is done right at sunset using calls that emulate wounded prey (my wife HATES the rabbit squeal). Electronic calls and decoys can also help. They are pretty tricky critters so it's not going to be easy. There's a TON of videos on  youtube... this one isn't bad as a high level introduction:https://youtu.be/HsvTkZb94Vo

Now, all that being said: one of the most successful coyote hunters I know is my cousin. All he does is keep a scoped .22 by a window w/ a view on the chicken coop. He inevitably catches them sniffing around the fence and stacks them up with monotonous regularity.

A good scope or binoculars should let you confirm that you are shooting a coyote during legal hours.

The other alternative is trapping... personally I have had zero success with traps, but your mileage may vary. 

Good luck!

 

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38 minutes ago, jgradyc said:

1) how can I see them

You can’t without spending a bunch of money or having lights you can turn on. I wouldn’t try a 100-200 yard shot in a residential area. Too much risk and liability. If something goes wrong that distance will be seen as reckless.

38 minutes ago, jgradyc said:

3) how do I ensure I don't break any TN laws. (All my neighbors support this, by the way.)

I would talk to whatever department would respond to a “shots fired” in your area. And see what they tell you. You say all your neighbors support it. That would be great, but if one calls in a “shots fired” call you could have some drama.

The news had a story on the other night about Coyotes approaching houses in Green Hills, so I assume LE will have some answers for you. My guess is they won't tell you that you can shoot them unless a person is in immediate danger. But that's just my WAG.

https://www.wsmv.com/news/green-hills-neighbors-say-coyotes-are-taking-over-neighborhood/article_18fedf38-3092-11e9-abdb-47ff8f10a257.html

 

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Good point. I just assumed w/ a 200 yard shot in the backyard he'd be outside of town.

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This is a very rural area. Two hundred yards would typically only be a shot from one hillside to the other. This is also a very hilly area.  I'd set up so the shot would have a hill 100-200 feet high as a barrier and so that any homes would be behind me.  Maximum sight range would probably be 200 yards. A safe shot would be less in the summer due to more vegetation. Plus, I'm not a great shot. I'd want a much closer shot, but I'm just giving the maximum range for information purposes.

I'm thinking set up would be relatively easy. Prevailing winds are typically from the west. The coyotes live to the west and north. There are several thousand acres of hilly forest to the west. 

"Shots fired" made me laugh. Shots are fired nearly every day and sometimes at night by neighbors doing target practice or whatever. The only thing that might bring a police response out here would be return fire! 

Edited by jgradyc

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1: Get a permit from the TWRA.

2: Have them put yourself and someone you trust that has night vision or Thermal on the permit. 

3: Shoot them at night. 

Edited by alleycat72
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10 hours ago, jgradyc said:

I just looked into night scopes and was shocked to see prices in the $2,500 range. That's way outside my budget.

Look at the ATN X-Sight series.  Example footage found via YouTube:

 

 

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Stay away from the older ATN MK390 type scopes. They burn out internally unless you turn them on at lest once a month. Nothing in the manual about that but that's what ATN CS said you need to do.  The newer gen scopes have come down considerably in price. I'v yet to buy one just for my stash.

Edited by xtriggerman

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