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Garufa

Return of the Colt Python

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If your name is supposed to represent a quality product, then you have to keep up the quality in order to keep the reputation.  Colt has been spotty about that.  In the late '70s, they tried to cut costs and quality suffered for about a decade.

I think it would have been worth the effort to keep the original Python in the custom shop, just like the SAA.  Even if they lost a few dollars on each one, the benefit of having a top-quality iconic pistol would probably more than pay off in terms of reputation.

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They'll get it working. Some of the acclaimed best gun makers on the market have their claim to fame and yet, make constant mistakes. Kimber comes to mind. They decided to get into the revolver world and since its realize, the D6 has problems. As does their micro lines and the ones that had nothing but probs like the Solo... Now striker fired? They'd best fix their originals and leave the modern to the other guys till they are squared away.

You say how can any company screw up a revolver but, hey... it happened...


Springfield Armory, another legend in name, people say it's not the original company. (Very few are and all the skilled craftsman are dead and gone)... But they want to stay afloat while trying to keep the M1s  alive but still be in a market place.
I bought one of their TRP Operator 1911s and it sucked right out of the box. Could not even rack it because it was locked. Got to a point, I was done arguing with them and fixed it myself. They never deburred anything inside and the barrel was terribly finished. It's like glass now and smooth as butter and their only remedy was just shoot it and get back to us. Idiots... I'm a bear and if I can't rack a 1911, something is wrong!

HK was considered high end and when I first bought mine, was considered exotic guns. But ran like a Swiss watch. Finding a holster was a bitch though. They were not cheap and when they saw a competitive market for striker fired, they jumped on the band wagon with their VP line. Fine guns but a lot more cheaper than their original lines. 

So Colt is no different. They are in a competitive market where they finally realized keeping the historic name of Colt, if it is to endure, must try to match the market woes. Yes, they had their downfalls to the point where I was very sad and wanted them to come back. Everyone is trying to be competitive. In any company, you are not going to find a skilled craftsman with an anvil and sledge banging out parts. Not when you have all the modern machines like CNC and stuff. Why would any company? 

IF you want to pay for a one on one gun, look to Nighthawk, I own 2 of them now and had the honor to tour their plant. They too have all the modern machinery, cnc, lathes, lasers, etc., But once the parts are popped out, one person works on it till done. Hand fitting everything with a tight tolerance and buttery smooth actions. The craftsman are the best I've seen. Their dedication is unmatched imho... It's not a small mom pop gunsmith. They are huge...
They price you pay is for their dedication and great weapons.

Finally, one last thing. The complaining of the prices. Cheap guns are under a grand. Good to better guns start there and hover to under 2 grand. Custom guns are over that... My  Nighthawks started over $4500 each and were over $5200 each when finished. The adage, you get what you pay for is true. But you need to realize the days of the $275 Colt Pythons are over. In order for any company to stay in business, they must compete and still make a profit. Otherwise, whats the point? $1500 msrp is not bad imho. You'll get it for less when the fad calms down. I wish I never sold my Pythons but, who knew they'd explode back from the Walking Dead so to speak.

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Edited by BHunted
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On 1/2/2020 at 5:13 PM, Garufa said:

That’s the truth.  I “might” be interested if they could duplicate that sweet old Royal Blue that’s always made this diehard S&W fan drool but there’s no way they can.

Polishing stainless is a whole lot easier and takes a lot less skill than properly blueing guns.

If they would make a model with the Royal Blue, then I'd buy one or two.

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I seriously doubt the Royal Blue finish will be back. Its a lot of work as the intensive polishing is the real cause of that beautiful blue finish.  If they did bring back the Royal Blue, I'd imagine the price would jump considerably. 

The polished stainless currently sold is pretty. But I've never been much for shiny guns. Besides I'm looking more at the 2020 Python as a shooter and working gun. Honestly, I'd be happy with a plain black finish as long as it looked decent.

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18 hours ago, 1gewehr said:

If your name is supposed to represent a quality product, then you have to keep up the quality in order to keep the reputation.  Colt has been spotty about that.  In the late '70s, they tried to cut costs and quality suffered for about a decade.

I think it would have been worth the effort to keep the original Python in the custom shop, just like the SAA.  Even if they lost a few dollars on each one, the benefit of having a top-quality iconic pistol would probably more than pay off in terms of reputation.

I couldn't agree more. Or much the same as Marlin did with the original Golden Model 39-A lever action, forged steel and Walnut .22. The gun became too expensive to produce as a cataloged model. So it was relegated to a custom manufactured gun with a 4 digit price tag. They are not going to sell many of them at that price. But the customers who are buying them are going to get the same, or perhaps even better quality then before the gun was discontinued. This "new" Python is nowhere near the same quality of the old models. It is little more than a cosmetic facsimile of what the original was.... At a very high price. 

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The last of the original Pythons made by Colt's Custom Shop weren't up to snuff. A friend of mine bought one and it never was right. Two trips back to Colt couldn't get it working properly. He finally sold it at a loss just to be rid of it. 

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They're beautiful revolvers, had one in the early 1980's and unfortunately sold it. Everyone needs to own at least one nice revolver. I now have only a S&W 686 plus, 4" barrel. I don't want a pricey safe queen. With my age came a little more practicality in owning handguns. If I were younger I'd have a different outlook on investment or passing it down.

These days, what practicality is there with a six shot revolver compared to a semi-auto with 10-15-17 rounds or more? For home or CCW defense, one doesn't know how many assailants or the situation faced. I'm old and slow, and can reload a magazine much faster than speed clips when necessary. The only practical use I've found with my S&W revolver; is the occasional rotation if I want to win my division in USPSA steel challenge [being the only one shooting a revolver 😁].

The handgun used in a self defense situation is going to be confiscated for evidence. I've heard horror stories about the treatment of their expensive handguns when confiscated, if they were ever even returned at all without hiring a lawyer. 

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