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Who has a Hornady Lock N Load Auto-Progressive Reloading Press?


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I am looking for a progressive and I think this will be my first choice.

http://www.amazon.com/Hornady-Lock-Auto-Progressive-Reloading-Press/dp/B000PD01NS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461725117&sr=8-1&keywords=progressive+press&refinements=p_72%3A2661618011%2Cp_n_condition-type%3A6461716011%2Cp_89%3AHornady%7CRCBS

 

If you have one what do you not like? I just want to make sure there isn't something I can't live with.

 

If you thin there is a better choice by all means let me know.

 

I know Dillon is the best but it is also the most expensive. I have also read Dillon can be difficult to use. So Dillon is out of the question for me.

 

Thanks

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I just bought one with the case feeder. Set up in 9mm,40,& 45acp. Soon to add 223. Like all progressives it's a bit fiddly to set up, but nothing hard. Some trial & error on things like case mouth expanding with the case activated powder drop. Also the case feed took me 5 min to dial in. Primer feed seems reliable and was easy to set up. Buy extra primer tubes as you only get one of each size.

I thought the die bushings would be a gimic but on a progressive they make sense. Buy extras you'll be glad.

I'm going to try a bullet feeder in the future but not sure which one yet.

I bought mine through Grafs as they had the best deal.

The only other thing I plan on is an ergo roller handle but I'm 6'4" if I was 6'2" I wouldn't care.
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All progressive press can give you trouble at sometimes. I been using a Dillon 550 since 82. Yes it has given me problems. Yes Dillon has fix it with free parts fast. I also pickup a used 550b several years ago and Dillon redone it for free. I don't use the 550's for rifle. I use a single stage for rifle. When it comes to reloading equipment don't go cheap. Save up a get the gold standard, Dillon.
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I have had one for 3 years.  I have loaded 9mm  and 45ACP routinely.  Comparable to the D 650.  Has 5 die slots.  Very happy.  Friend of mine loads other calibers.  Welcome to come by and take a look.  Nothing but good to say about customer support...if needed.

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I have one that I bought used on this Forum a few years ago.  It is the only progressive I've ever used, and I'm happy with it.  It seemed pretty easy to figure how to set it up and operate it.  I don't have the auto case or bullet feeders.

 

The only fiddly thing I've encountered is the primer feed has to be cleaned out (usually stray grains of powder) occasionally during long reloading sessions.

 

I use it to do all of the functions for reloading pistol calibers (tumbled fired brass inserted on the first station, loaded rounds drop out the 5th).  I do my rifle brass prep separately, and use the progressive to throw the powder and seat/crimp the bullets.

 

I've only had to contact Hornady customer service once, but they sent out a replacement part for free (clear plastic sleeve for powder measure).

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I bought one last year after using a Dillon Square Deal B for a few years.  I worked a Cabela's deal and wound up getting it for $330, which I felt was too good to pass up.  As others have said, it can be finicky.  I load mainly 9mm, and I was hoping I'd be able to crank out rounds faster, especially with the bullet feeder die.  Unfortunately, I have not made it through a single batch of 100 rounds yet without having to stop to fix several hiccups like spent primers getting jammed between the shell plate and sub plate, shell plate not indexing all the way, primers not feeding, primers not seating all the way,tube falling out of bullet feeder die (spilling bullets everywhere), etc.  I was actually faster with the Square Deal.  

 

I will say that the one time I called Hornady, I got right through to a friendly rep who promptly sent a replacement for a broken part (that was totally my fault).  Calling Dillon always involved a long wait on hold and then a conversation with helpful, but usually less friendly, reps.  

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I bought one last year after using a Dillon Square Deal B for a few years.  I worked a Cabela's deal and wound up getting it for $330, which I felt was too good to pass up.  As others have said, it can be finicky.  I load mainly 9mm, and I was hoping I'd be able to crank out rounds faster, especially with the bullet feeder die.  Unfortunately, I have not made it through a single batch of 100 rounds yet without having to stop to fix several hiccups like spent primers getting jammed between the shell plate and sub plate, shell plate not indexing all the way, primers not feeding, primers not seating all the way,tube falling out of bullet feeder die (spilling bullets everywhere), etc.  I was actually faster with the Square Deal.  
 
I will say that the one time I called Hornady, I got right through to a friendly rep who promptly sent a replacement for a broken part (that was totally my fault).  Calling Dillon always involved a long wait on hold and then a conversation with helpful, but usually less friendly, reps.  

 

PM me. We can fix that I believe. Available most mornings. Edited by chances R
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I am looking for a progressive and I think this will be my first choice.

http://www.amazon.com/Hornady-Lock-Auto-Progressive-Reloading-Press/dp/B000PD01NS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461725117&sr=8-1&keywords=progressive+press&refinements=p_72%3A2661618011%2Cp_n_condition-type%3A6461716011%2Cp_89%3AHornady%7CRCBS

 

If you have one what do you not like? I just want to make sure there isn't something I can't live with.

 

If you thin there is a better choice by all means let me know.

 

I know Dillon is the best but it is also the most expensive. I have also read Dillon can be difficult to use. So Dillon is out of the question for me.

 

Thanks

I have had one of these presses for a year or so.  I really like that you can move individual dies in and out.  This allows me to run it similar to a single stage.  When I decap I just put that die in and run them through.  If I'm running progressive and one of the dies is acting up I can just pull it out and clean it or what ever I need without disturbing the other dies. I've had no real issues with it and have never wished I had went with the Dillon instead, not that there is anything wrong with the Dillon equipment.  Both are very good.

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I almost hate getting into these conversations, people are too wrapped up on color (brand).  Both the Dillon and the Hornady presses are great for what they are, but I don't reload like that so right off the bat I am at a disadvantage.  I use a Lee Turret press, not so much because its decently fast, great quality, low cost etc etc...it just fits my reloading style.  I always hear people say the use their progressives only for pistol, and that's great, but do you really need to spend all that much for pistol?  Here is why I stay with a turret (chose it because it was on sale to be honest).

 

I deprime all my brass before I clean it, before I used to use the sizing die to deprime, so that was one step in a progressive I would have to skip in the sequence.  Now I use a universal die, so I now size in the turret after cleaning so I could use that step.

 

After sizing, I then prime all my cases usually either 20 (rifle) or 50 (pistol) at a time. Again, this would not be easy with a progressive since it would want to index to the next step in the sequence.

 

Then, I drop (pistol, and plinking rifle) or weigh (rifle, hunting, SD, pistol SD too) powder into all the cases.  Same as above, progressive wants to progress.

 

After a quick look see into all the cases to make sure all have powder and none are different levels (double) now I seat the bullet.  See above for progressive.

 

Crimp is as needed, not all my reloads get a crimp on an FCD, some I give a slight roll crimp in the step above.  Progressive..ditto, wants to move.

 

Now for the most important (to me) things I like turrets over progressives, caliber changes.  With additional turrets caliber swap takes just a few minutes, seconds for the dies, the rest is setting up the powder dropper.  Then there is the shell plates, I find that they flex, and, especially with Lee, some dies don't size the brass right due to the flex.  I have turrets for all my calibers, even most rifle, but do use a single stage for some 2 die sets I have.  And last is cost, first the new setup is way over what a turret press will cost, then there are the caliber conversion kits, Dillon around $50 per kit, Hornady around $30-$35ish for a shell plate and bushing, Lee? $10 for the turret, case holder comes with their die sets.

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I re-read your OP and have the following comments about the Hornady progressive.

The bad:

The powder through expander is a bit time consuming to set up. I don't know if the Dillon 650 is better or worse. This is not a deal breaker for me and as I usually set up for a caliber and load a bunch it's not really a problem.

I don't like the Hornady combo seat & crimp die. It's a bit sticky and when lowering the ram things can jerk a bit this can cause stray powder grains that bounce out of the cases. It also can it erupt the case drop causing a fresh piece of brass to slide off the feed. I will be installing a separate taper crimp die.

The case inserted can occasionally not fully insert the case into the shell plate.

The good:

The bushings make set up easy because you can install one die at a time set it then remove it to make room to set up the next one. Thus is very slick

The shell plate indexes half way on the down stroke, and the other half on the up stroke. This is safer as indexing is performed by two separate sets of parts. If one fails the shell plate won't be indexed correctly and will be noticed immediately. It also makes the press smoother.

The primer pick up tubes have a nice plastic tip that holds the primer well and the don't drop primers.

Primer feed is smooth and locks back with the follower rod giving a clear indication that all primers have been used.

No spent primer catcher is supplied, just a tube that you insert in your own container, I use an old soda bottle. This saves having to empty them every couple hundred rounds.

I'm pretty happy and as I use it more it gets better. I've only loaded about 2000 rounds so far. It is quite nicely built and I expect to pass it on to my son. Actual volume capacity is about 400-500 per hour, but I'm most comfortable at 350ish. This is using a case collator.

I have used or owned the Lee 1000, Lee load master, Dillon 550, and CH Autochampion mk5. I have narrowed my presses down to the CH, the Hornady AP, and the Forester Co-Ax

I hope this helps. I'd invite you to look it over but you're a bit layer up right now, ant the press is currently in NY State, soon to move to East TN. After you are back on your feet drop me a note and I might have it set up down here. You can also PM me and we can discuss specific questions that way or on the phone. Edited by Sidecarist
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The 550 is pretty simple , had a Square Deal B before that when I only loaded 45acp.  Just depends on what you are going to load , how many rounds , pistol or rifle or both ?

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Tonight I had another frustrating session with the LNL that ended with a broken pawl. I hate this thing.


I have had primers get caught between the shell plate and carrier but it has always been a mis-adjusted die not quite pushing them all the way out, or me short stroking the press ever so slightly. Next time it happens measure the OAL of the seated bullet in station 4 or 5 and I bet it will be about .005 long.

Even though it's a progressive press I can't be in a hurry, to many things going on....
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I bought one from Midway on sale several years ago and have loaded many thousands of rounds with it. 

 

The main issue I have is due to my laziness.  I don't swage primer pockets with 223 and sometimes brass shavings will get caught where the primer seats and it will lock up. 

 

I have adjusted the pawls a couple times for alignment which is no big deal. 

 

Hornady quick change bushing system is great.  It is really fast and easy to change calibers. 

 

I have changed the handle to the inline fab ergo roller handle.  That's personal preference....nothing wrong with the factory one. 

 

I bent the rod that the primer doohickey slides on which was my fault.   A quick call to Hornady and they shipped one out at no charge the same day...great customer service.   Overall I've been very pleased with it and would buy another if I was in the market today.

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I have had one about a year and loaded several thousand 45acp with it. I love it. Was going to buy a dillion but a buddy let me use his LNL and I have never looked back. I usually load 100rds at a time in about 30min.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I had a Hornady Lock N Load progressive for a short time.  Loaded around 400 rounds of .38 special on it then packed it up and sold it on gunbroker.  It frustrated the crap out of me..Now loading on a Lee Loadmaster and having no problems.

 

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If I didn't have three Dillon 1050s, I would STiLL be using my Hornady L-N-L AP. Great press.

I taught my son and s.i.l. on a Hornady L-N-L and it is very easy to learn on. Unlike Dillons, it is very open and easy to see what is happening. You can load cases and bullets with your left hand while keeping your right hand on the handle.

You seat bullets at station 4 and, unlike other presses, that station is right under your nose so you can just look down and SEE the powder in the case. Easy to avoid squibs or double charges.

For myself, there are two choices:

1) Hornady L-N-L if you don't need a case collator.

2) Dillon 650 or 1050 is you do need a case collator.

I would not waste money on any progressive press with fewer than five die stations (and they have to be DIE stations and not 4 die stations and a dedicated priming stations) or one that is NOT auto-indexing.

Your needs may be different, but my set-up is:

1) size

1.5) prime

2) expand, flare, and charge case

3) RCBS Lock-Out die

4) seat

5) crimp

So, yes, I really do NEED five die stations...

Edited by noylj
corrected "station"
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On 6/2/2016 at 4:54 PM, noylj said:

If I didn't have three Dillon 1050s, I would STiLL be using my Hornady L-N-L AP. Great press.

I taught my son and s.i.l. on a Hornady L-N-L and it is very easy to learn on. Unlike Dillons, it is very open and easy to see what is happening. You can load cases and bullets with your left hand while keeping your right hand on the handle.

You seat bullets at statin 4 and, unlike other presses, that station is right under your nose so you can just look down and SEE the powder in the case. Easy to avoid squibs or double charges.

For myself, there are two choices:

1) Hornady L-N-L if you don't need a case collator.

2) Dillon 650 or 1050 is you do need a case collator.

I would not waste money on any progressive press with fewer than five die stations (and they have to be DIE stations and not 4 die stations and a dedicated priming stations) or one that is NOT auto-indexing.

Your needs may be different, but my set-up is:

1) size

1.5) prime

2) expand, flare, and charge case

3) RCBS Lock-Out die

4) seat

5) crimp

So, yes, I really do NEED five die stations...

Exactly the same here.  Had a 1050, perfectly happy with the LNL.

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I don't understand the problem folks have with the Hornady measure and PTXs.

I set-up the measure in station 4 so there is nothing in the way and I can turn the measure up and down to my heart's content. For 99% of all cartridges (I haven't loaded them all), the adjustment to get full cycle is to turn the die up or down as needed. To adjust the flare, the adjustment is to turn the die up or down. There has always been enough play for me to get both set and not do any thing else. I have no idea how or why you would use the turn-buckle thingy they include. Once it is locked down in the die bushing, I move it to station 2 and, since there are something like 8 positions you can insert the die bushing, I insert it so it doesn't interfere with anything.

Why is something that seems so simple to me so complicated for so many?

The Dillon has the "advantage" of being able to loosen the measure from the die so you can adjust the die without the measure moving, but I find that adjust that die is worse than the Hornady die, so, for me, it's six of one and half a dozen of the other.

 

Edited by noylj
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  • 2 weeks later...

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