Jump to content

Where do I go in the Nashville area to learn about AR15s?


Joe86

Recommended Posts

What do you need to know?  Are you looking to build your own or buy one already complete?  If you just want to buy, look at the ads here, there are a few available.  If you are looking to build, a would guess many of the shops that sell parts are available for info as well, around here Midsouth or TN Gun Country are good places to start.

Link to comment

There are some good resources here that I have learned from. Just search the threads. 

On a side note. I would not consider an AR an upgrade from shotguns. They both have a purpose. I might have misunderstood but I see them both good for different purposes. Just my .02. 

Edited by spurge
Link to comment

I don't have any interest in building my own, at least at this point. My interest is learning about the options and finding an existing built gun that most closely fits what I can determine I want. I guess what I need is some schooling and a shop where I can buy a complete gun. 

Link to comment
15 minutes ago, Joe86 said:

I don't have any interest in building my own, at least at this point. My interest is learning about the options and finding an existing built gun that most closely fits what I can determine I want. I guess what I need is some schooling and a shop where I can buy a complete gun. 

The easiest question is: do you plan to have magnified optics?

second: what is planned use of said rifle?

third: budget,sans accessories and/or optics?

Link to comment

I'll just right ahead and say look at the Ruger AR556 and Smith & Wesson M&P Sport II.  Both are excellent choices in the $650 price range (more or less, ideally less).  

Don't get all wound up on the absurd amount of options and variations.  Start simple. 

Edited by Garufa
  • Like 6
Link to comment
The recruiter's office.

Does the military teach you which rifles under $1,000 are best in the civilian market?

Guess I need to tell my buddy that was SF that he got screwed, he came out knowing little to nothing of how to put together an AR. How to maintenance one, sure. But actually disassemble, upgrade, and reassemble...no sir.

OP, If you're looking for actual info, you're in the right place. As far as budget friendly options I don't think you can go wrong with either the Ruger 5.56 or the S&W entry models.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

As mentioned earlier, you aren't really "upgrading" your shotgun, you're just getting a different weapon.

I'll be the wet blanket that says building an AR before you've had your hands on one for a bit isn't anything I'd recommend.  To me, that's like learning how to repair a car before you learn how to drive.  First, try to shoot one if you haven't already.  I'm sure you can find a rental, or a TGO member in your area that will let you get some time behind one.  You might find that you don't like it, and an AK is more to your style.

If you're still wanting to go with an AR after that, first stop would be to find a good used one if I was buying now with your budget.  If you want new out of the box, I'd buy an Anderson or PSA over the Ruger or S&W models mentioned, but that's a personal taste.  You can even post a want to buy ad in the trading post if you don't see one you like.  This is where you'll want to ask a lot of questions and do some research on your own.  Just because someone is selling a gun here isn't a guarantee of quality, just a less likely chance of getting screwed.

Once you know you like ARs, have one in hand, get to Carnegie hall.  That means practice, practice, practice.  Use the cleaning time after your practice to learn the innards of the gun, watch as many videos on it as you like.  The AR is simple enough to start with, but getting to a higher level takes time.

  • Like 2
Link to comment

Until you get some experience go with the big names and stay away from the other stuff. Smith & Wesson, Ruger, Colt, DPMS and Bushmaster are some of the top names. If you are looking for .223; you can stay Mil-Spec and your options are pretty much unlimited. In .308 that is not an option; they are all over the places and there is little compatibility in options.

Once you get a rifle and start having questions; right here is the place to get the answers.

Welcome to the world of Evil Black Riles (EBR).

Link to comment

I'd buy the cheapest aluminum lowered rifle that you can find.  PSA has several for $699 now.  Then you have $300 to play with for optics, mags, and ammo.  I'd still recommend building one and saving about $200 for the same build and having that extra money for optics and whatnot.  Building is not complicated. 

Link to comment

Question for those of you who know ARs:

I went to a local shop to get a M & P sport II. I asked how to attach a light. I was told I need to change out the forend to one that had rails, which they had in stock. I was fine with this. When I ask if they could do it for me they said it had to be done by a gunsmith who had a special tool. This is where the excellent price took a $60+ dollar turn. I thought AR were designed to be easily worked on. Is this something specific to the M & P, or am I going down a rabbit hole from the git go?

Should I look at the Ruger AR with the screw on sleve to avoid having to deal with this or buy the tool?

Thanks

 

Link to comment
20 minutes ago, Joe86 said:

Question for those of you who know ARs:

I went to a local shop to get a M & P sport II. I asked how to attach a light. I was told I need to change out the forend to one that had rails, which they had in stock. I was fine with this. When I ask if they could do it for me they said it had to be done by a gunsmith who had a special tool. This is where the excellent price took a $60+ dollar turn. I thought AR were designed to be easily worked on. Is this something specific to the M & P, or am I going down a rabbit hole from the git go?

Should I look at the Ruger AR with the screw on sleve to avoid having to deal with this or buy the tool?

Thanks

 

The M&P Sport doesn’t have quad rails (handguards); they are just plain.

Quality Free float handguards that have rails are not cheap. $60 is cheap; what were they going to put on?

This is the type tool they are talking about...

Link to comment
29 minutes ago, DaveTN said:

The M&P Sport doesn’t have quad rails (handguards); they are just plain.

Quality Free float handguards that have rails are not cheap. $60 is cheap; what were they going to put on?

This is the type tool they are talking about...

I doubt they were talking of that tool, probably were talking of replacing the delta ring with a barel nut for the handguard they were trying to sell him.  Probably an armorers wrench and torque wrench as stated above.  I say this because though that tool works, it's really not necessary, you can remove those handguards without tools.

Link to comment
56 minutes ago, Joe86 said:

Question for those of you who know ARs:

I went to a local shop to get a M & P sport II. I asked how to attach a light. I was told I need to change out the forend to one that had rails, which they had in stock. I was fine with this. When I ask if they could do it for me they said it had to be done by a gunsmith who had a special tool. This is where the excellent price took a $60+ dollar turn. I thought AR were designed to be easily worked on. Is this something specific to the M & P, or am I going down a rabbit hole from the git go?

Should I look at the Ruger AR with the screw on sleve to avoid having to deal with this or buy the tool?

Thanks

 

Now you're getting into the real costs of an AR, the accessories.  Would that you could have told us you wanted a light with it, then we could have recommended one with hand guards that could readily accept a mount for one, or an add on rail.  I'll say up front, if you want quality parts, get ready to pay for quality. 

Some rails are drop-in, meaning you don't need a gunsmith to change the barrel nut to put them on, you just need to take off the current handguards.  For your level, that's what I'd go after.  If you want to upgrade your rail/handguard later, you can.  Magpul MOE, or this offering from B5 systems is what I'd recommend.  for a quick way to swap it out and put a light on.  But you're looking at more costs for a good mount, and the light.

 

34 minutes ago, DaveTN said:

This is the type tool they are talking about...

Pffft....the proper tool for that job is man hands. :P

  • Like 2
Link to comment
18 minutes ago, Omega said:

I doubt they were talking of that tool, probably were talking of replacing the delta ring with a barel nut for the handguard they were trying to sell him.  Probably an armorers wrench and torque wrench as stated above.  I say this because though that tool works, it's really not necessary, you can remove those handguards without tools.

Yep. I have lots of AR tools, but never needed one for a delta ring

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

THE FINE PRINT

Tennessee Gun Owners (TNGunOwners.com) is the premier Community and Discussion Forum for gun owners, firearm enthusiasts, sportsmen and Second Amendment proponents in the state of Tennessee and surrounding region.

TNGunOwners.com (TGO) is a presentation of Enthusiast Productions. The TGO state flag logo and the TGO tri-hole "icon" logo are trademarks of Tennessee Gun Owners. The TGO logos and all content presented on this site may not be reproduced in any form without express written permission. The opinions expressed on TGO are those of their authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the site's owners or staff.

Before engaging in any transaction of goods or services on TGO, all parties involved must know and follow the local, state and Federal laws regarding those transactions. TGO makes no claims, guarantees or assurances regarding any such transactions.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to the following.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Guidelines
 
We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.