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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/22/2016 in all areas

  1. Well, it's finally here. Took almost a year and a half but I have my new double rifle in my hot little hands. She's a bespoke double built specifically for me by L'Atelier Verney Carron. Azur model in .450-400 Nitro Express. She handles like a dream. I can close my eyes and shoulder the rifle... when I open them the sights are perfectly aligned. The balance on this thing is unbelievable and makes this 9.6lb rifle feel much lighter than it is. Of course all this quality comes at a steep price... this is by far the most expensive weapon I've ever purchased and the only way I pulled it off is with the help of TGO. I joke that in order to afford her I had to sell every gun I own that doesn't have a name and while that's an exaggeration it's only because I don't name my handguns. So, if you've bought a gun from me in the last year and a half... thank you... you helped pay for this bad girl. Oleg Volk did a photo shoot with her and you'll find some of the photos below. These are unretouched studio shots so there are a few studio artifacts that will be removed before they are published, but I just couldn't wait to show her off. Enjoy and thanks again to everyone who helped me make this happen.
    11 points
  2. Today I took a few minutes to try a few tasks with the bushcraft knife I commissioned from GT a few weeks ago. I didn't put it through brutal tasks, but did try some basic ones that I expect a knife to do if I'm going to carry it. First, the knife is made from 1095 steel that my calipers measure as 0.155 inches thick. Blade length is approximately 5 inches and OAL is about 10.5 inches. The scales are mesquite (I'm sure GT will correct me if I am wrong) and I asked him to include jimping on the top of the blade as well as the extension beyond the handle. The knife came with a nice sharp edge, but me being me, I worked on it a bit and got it where I wanted it. I started the test by cutting some paper to show the edge quality. First thing I did was take some red oak firewood I have and split a couple of pieces off using another piece of oak as a baton. The knife easily made fast work of the splitting thanks to the thickness of the blade and the flat grind. The blade took the force of the baton strikes just fine and the tip and handle were not damaged. Next, I took one of the pieces I split and did some shavings as you would do on a feather stick. The knife edge was still very sharp and I had no difficulty. I also used the edge of the spine to scrape some wood from the piece as one would do to make tinder. Next, to test the tip, I used the blade to drill a divot in the oak. This was an easy task and the tip held up without any damage. I have tested the blade spine on a ferro rod previously and it is excellent for this task. After these tasks, I wanted to see how the edge had held up and I used the same sheet of paper to test the cut. I also tried a cut on a piece of soft bread, which my dog appreciated since she got to eat the results. Needless to say, the edge was still extremely sharp and it only took a couple of swipes on my leather strop to get it back to razor sharp. If I had some natural fiber rope I would have tried that, but I'm confident the results would have been positive. I am still thrilled with this knife and look forward to many years of enjoying it in the woods on my outdoor adventures. If you've ever considered one of GT's knives, just do it already! You won't regret it. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    8 points
  3. I'm glad you gave it a workout and thanks for posting it up. :up:  It's the main reason I send these out to be professionally heat treated...for durability.
    4 points
  4. The pros are still performing the autopsy, but someone on TGO already knows the cause of death. Stop the presses! ELvis was a fat druggie, but I still appreciate the music and the talent. It's easy to separate the two. Great artist. R.I.P. Prince!
    3 points
  5. During the hot months an ice cream truck comes down our street three or four times a week on a special run for an autistic child.  Knowing the mission, it's sweet music to all the neighbors' ears.
    3 points
  6. There are men left, you are just looking in the wrong place. I served side by side with many of them in the Marines Corps. They exist in all branches of the military, and still exist in the blue collar world of manual labor, both skilled and unskilled. Though the numbers dwindle, the men are still out there. As for the hero above, I had heard his story before and all I can say is that some men just refuse to die. Sent from behind the anvil
    3 points
  7. I turned my phone up and played that video, within 10 seconds my 10 year old son was in my room looking for the ice cream truck!! I wish I could call turkeys that well.
    3 points
  8. Just to brighten up your Friday afternoon, it's really encouraging to see a judge with some empathy.  I appreciated his comments about how "sometimes they lose their way", but still recognizes their humanity:   http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/concerned_about_veteran_with_ptsd_judge_orders_him_to_jail_and_serves_the_t  
    2 points
  9. 2 points
  10. The quantity of my admiration is only surpassed by the rigidity of my tumescence. That's one of THE most beautiful doubles I've ever seen!
    2 points
  11. J frame (or LCP) + belly band = :up: As crazy as it may sound, a belly band has become my favorite method 90% of the time. I can easily conceal anything from a small 380 to a G19 in as little as gym shorts and a T-shirt. Even with jeans, my gun is independant from my pants/belt, so there is no sagging or printing. It took a little while to get used to, but I like it now. I have some really nice holsters, but they don't get as much use. I carry at about 4:00 position and low on the hips. A j frame or something like an LCP would be completly invisible in a belly band with a tux, and it would be just as accessable as if it were in an IWB holster. Plus it keeps your undershirt tucked in :) That's how I'd roll.
    2 points
  12. I'll test her out on a Cape Buffalo in June. Caprivi strip in Namibia... hunting the flood plains of the Chobe River. Some really big herds there... looking for an old dagga boy. Can't wait!
    2 points
  13. so i got a text message from his phone number today - said its his wife, and that brad is in the hospital, she said give her my last name and she would check if it was shipped or in pending work.  i don't know if hes playing some kinda game, but i sent a certified letter demanding my property back with a box with prepaid postage, and i am calling around for an attorney around knoxville to handle a small claims case for me.  I also went through my phone archive and retrieved the recording of the phone call - where he told me the what it would cost, i agreed, he told me where to send it, and gave me specific instructions. and i said okay great thanks, ill ship it out tomorrow.  i am sure this recording will constitute proof of a contract. - along with a print out of my call history from at&t to legitimize it. i don't care what i have to spend a thousands, i'm gonna pin him down so he cant do this to someone else that doesn't have the resources to fight back. 
    2 points
  14. Great singer, song writer, overall musician, but the man was one hell of a guitar player.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y
    2 points
  15. I know some people hate 'em...but in my experience they don't understand them and therefore wear them wrong. I'm talking about a bellyband holster.   They suck as far as reholstering as they require 2 hands to do so safely. And they should be worn at, or below, the beltline...not way above it as so many interweb photos demonstrate.   I am on my 3rd or 4th bellyband and wear one in nonpermissive environments daily, have for years.   Just a suggestion for your consideration.   Congratulations and Best wishes to your son!       Here's a vid with Lenny Magill...he's quite the salesman, but at about 3:00 you can see a decent demo of correct placement. I carry appendix as well, but they work fine of strong side carry.     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf-59UbMOC8
    2 points
  16. Chelsea Clinton: Now that Scalia’s Gone We Can Enact Gun Control https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tN1BzLBmxI It's clear Clinton and Sanders will stack the Supreme Court with Anti-Constitutionalist Judicial Activists. Vote accordingly or your constitutional rights will suffer greatly.
    1 point
  17. I'm more worried about the driver, driving around hours a day listening to non-stop "Pop Goes The Weasel" , you wonder when he's going to snap.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. I will be working at Charlie Hafner's on Sunday Afternoon if anyone wants to come burn powder
    1 point
  20. GT makes truly awesome knives. If my funds ever match up with availability, I'ma gonna snatch one up!!!
    1 point
  21. Grip spray will get you killed on the streets.
    1 point
  22. Sounds like he was on the chopping block for some time.
    1 point
  23. I now have 3 knives from GT and will agree. They are beautifully handcrafted pieces of art that can withstand being put to use.
    1 point
  24. I have one on order right now! Thanks for the review!
    1 point
  25. Got to love a guy who can make a guitar ejaculate!
    1 point
  26.     Wow.  A magic sighting.  How have you been?
    1 point
  27. My dream caliber and rifle. There is something about a double rifle. Anytime I shoot mine at the range always have people asking about it.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Don't worry everyone, soon paper currency will be a thing of the past. Electronic currency will be the way of the future, makes it easier to track and that way you'll be able to only use your allotment. Easier for them to get ahold of it to. Heck, look at Japan and some countries in Europe, already setting limits on withdrawals. Mr. DJT has even suggest scalping a percentage of everyone's accounts to help with the country's debt. No sir, I don't like it. Reminds of the old saying, going to something or other in a hand basket..... And yes, Lincoln was a Republican, the first one in fact.
    1 point
  30. Beautiful! How many man hours do they have in something like that?
    1 point
  31. That's not a rifle, that's a supreme piece of fine art! The amount of labor, dedication and excellence of craftsmanship in that rifle is priceless.
    1 point
  32. That is gorgeous!!! Congrats
    1 point
  33. Lord, that is one beautiful weapon!
    1 point
  34. Thunderwear. Go ahead and laugh but it works. http://www.thunderwear.com/holsters.asp
    1 point
  35. Bunch of small stuff so their shipping was only $4.99
    1 point
  36. ggwilde's amazing posting about  Roy Benavidez made me remember this story.  I didnt know AIC Pitsenbarger, but I had friends that did, and were there in country at the same time as PJs.   Bear in mind that this guy was an Airman First class, which is an E-3, and was only around 21-22 at the time.   Its rare that a sister service would push hard for someone from another service to receive the Medal.   William H. Pitsenbarger: Bravest Among the Brave Vietnam War Veteran FACEBOOK TWITTER LINKEDIN PINTEREST PRINT 6/12/2006 • DWIGHT EISENHOWER, VIETNAM   Although it happened more than 35 years ago, a group of Army veterans of the Vietnam War still consider a young Air Force enlistee, a recipient of the Medal of Honor who gave his life to save theirs, the most courageous person they have ever known.     ‘He was the bravest man I’ve ever seen, and I saw it all,’ said Martin L. Kroah, Jr., who served two tours in Vietnam, one as a Special Forces officer. He was talking about Airman 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger, an Air Force pararescue and medical specialist from Piqua, Ohio, who had voluntarily left the relative safety of a helicopter to descend into a brutal jungle battle to treat and evacuate wounded soldiers in 1966. Pitsenbarger was credited with saving nine lives, after several times refusing to be evacuated himself, during a fight in which 106 of the 134 troopers were killed or badly wounded. Soon after the battle, his Air Force commanders nominated him for the Medal of Honor, but he did not receive it. An Army general recommended that the award be downgraded to the Air Force Cross, apparently because at the time there was not enough documentation of Pitsenbarger’s heroic actions. Pitsenbarger, on April 11, 1966, at his own request, descended 100 feet on a winch line from a Kaman HH-43 Huskie helicopter into a dense jungle valley and alighted in the middle of an encircled company of U.S. Army soldiers. The besieged troops were members of Company C, 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry of the 1st Infantry Division and were under attack by VC about 35 miles east of Saigon. Regarding Pitsenbarger’s actions, Daniel Kirby of Louisville, Ky., who had been a Company C rifleman, commented: ‘I was stunned that somebody was coming down to put themselves in that situation. It’s hard to believe that someone would voluntarily come into that battle and stay with it. He had to be the bravest person I’ve ever known.’ After landing, Pitsenbarger gave first aid to the wounded, decided which men needed to be evacuated first and strapped them into a wire basket called a Stokes litter. He helped get nine GIs lifted out of the battle and flown to a nearby field hospital. He refused evacuation himself several times in order to try to save more wounded men. Then his helicopter was hit by enemy fire and nearly disabled. Before leaving the area, his pilot, Harold D. Salem of Mesa, Ariz., signaled for Pitsenbarger to ride the litter up to safety. Again, he refused and waved the chopper off. Kroah, of Houston, said he remembered Pitsenbarger being lowered through the trees at a time when’small-arms fire would be so intense that it was deafening, and all a person could do was get as close to the ground as possible and pray.’ Before long Kroah had been wounded five times and was flat on the ground. ‘On three different occasions I glimpsed movement, and it was Pits dragging somebody behind a tree trunk or a fallen tree, trying to give them first aid,’ he recalled. ‘It just seemed like he was everywhere. Everybody else was ducking, and he was crouched and crawling and dragging people by the collar and pack straps out of danger….I’m not certain of the number of dead and wounded exactly, but I’m certain that the death count would have been much higher had it not been for the heroic efforts of Airman Pitsenbarger.’ Kroah added that the battle was so fierce that his own Army medic was frozen with fear and unable to move and that one of his fire-team leaders, a combat veteran of World War II and the Korean War, curled into a fetal position and wept. ‘For Airman Pitsenbarger to expose himself on three separate occasions to this enemy fire was certainly above and beyond the call of duty of any man,’ said Kroah. ‘It took tremendous courage to expose himself to the possibility of almost certain death in order to save the life of someone he didn’t even know….He had a total disregard for his own safety and tremendous courage.’ For the next couple of hours Pitsenbarger crawled through the thick jungle looking for wounded soldiers. He would drag them to the middle of the company’s small perimeter, putting them behind trees and logs for shelter. At one point, said Charles Epperson, of Paris, Mo., Pitsenbarger saw two wounded soldiers outside the perimeter. ‘He said, ‘We’ve got to go get those people,’ and I said, ‘No way. I’m staying behind my tree.’ It was just unbelievable fire coming at us from all sides. But he took off to get those guys, and I could see him trying to get both of them and having a hard time, so I ran out there and helped him drag them inside our lines. He was an inspiration to me,’ said Epperson. Fred Navarro, who was seriously wounded, said Pitsenbarger saved his life by covering him with the bodies of two dead GIs, shielding him from more bullets. ‘We were getting pounded so bad that I could only lie on the ground for cover. Pitsenbarger continued cutting pant legs, shirts, pulling off boots and generally taking care of the wounded. At the same time, he amazingly proceeded to return enemy fire whenever he could,’ said Navarro, of San Antonio, Texas. F. David Peters, of Alliance, Ohio, had been in Vietnam only two weeks at the time of the incident. He recalled that he was terrified when he was told to help Pitsenbarger during the firefight. ‘I don’t remember how many wounded were taken out when we started taking small-arms fire,’ said Peters. ‘I remember him saying something to the [helicopter] pilot like, get out of here, I’ll get the next one out. His personal choice to…get on the ground to help the wounded is undoubtedly one of the bravest things I’ve ever seen,’ said Peters. Johnny W. Libs, a seasoned jungle fighter who was leading Company C that day, said he’d never seen a soldier who deserved the Medal of Honor more than Pitsenbarger. He recalled telling one of his machine-gunners, Phillip J. Hall, of Palmyra, Wis., that Pitsenbarger was out of his mind to leave his chopper for ‘this inferno on the ground. We knew we were in the fight of our lives and my knees were shaking, and I just couldn’t understand why anybody would put himself in this grave danger if he didn’t have to.’ Libs, of Evansville, Ind., also said that Pitsenbarger seemed to have no regard for his own safety. ‘We talk about him with reverence. I [had] never met him, but he’s just about the bravest man I have ever known. We were brave, too. We did our job. That’s what we were there for. He didn’t have to be there. He could have gotten out of there. There’s no doubt he saved lives that day.’ Hall said that Pitsenbarger’s descent into the firefight ‘was the most unselfish and courageous act I ever witnessed. I think of him often now,’ he added. ‘That thing never leaves my mind totally. He did actually give up his life for guys on the ground that he didn’t even know. And he didn’t have to be there. I know he made the conscious decision to stay there.’Salem said that Pitsenbarger had volunteered to go to the ground because the soldiers were having trouble putting a wounded man into the wire basket to be lifted out. The helicopter pilot recalled telling Pitsenbarger that he could leave the chopper only if he agreed that, when given a signal, he would return to the aircraft. ‘As we were [getting in position], I said, ‘Pits, it’s hotter than hell down there; do you still want to go down?’ He said, ‘Yes sir, I know I can really help out.’ He made a hell of a difference. We ended up getting nine more out after he got on the ground. He is the bravest person I’ve ever known,’ Salem said. Near dusk, as the VC launched another assault, Pitsenbarger fought back with an M-16. Then, Navarro said, he saw him gethit several times as he made his way toward what Navarro thought was another wounded man. Pitsenbarger was shot four times, once between the eyes, and died on the spot. The next day one of Pitsenbarger’s best friends, Henry J. O’Beirne of Huntsville, Ala., a former Air Force pararescueman who had served with him and been his bunkmate, recovered his body. ‘He was an ordinary man who did extraordinary things,’ said O’Beirne. The man called Pits by his friends was born and raised in Piqua, a blue-collar town of 22,000 on the Great Miami River in west-central Ohio, about 30 miles north of Dayton. Pitsenbarger was an only child. His father, Frank Pitsenbarger, said that his son had never been afraid of anything. His friends remembered him as an adventurous youngster who would climb the highest tree or scale the tallest building. Judy Meckstroth, who worked with him at a local supermarket when he was in high school, said he loved to play poker, was a ladies’ man, won dance contests, and showed concern for other people, both young and old. Meckstroth added that he was ‘ornery and fun-loving. You didn’t dare walk into the back room because he’d hide behind boxes and jump out and scare you to death. But I never heard anything bad about him. It was nothing to have 10 or 15 girls in the store on weekends; they’d come in to buy a pack of gum just to see him. But he wasn’t big-headed about it. He was just good-looking and had a real magnetic personality.’ Bob Ford, a retired Piqua assistant fire chief who knew him most of his life, said Pitsenbarger had two other loves: baseball and playing soldier. ‘There were lots of war movies then, and we played soldier in the streets and alleys all the time. He lived a block away from [a park] and there were always pick-up baseball games,’ he said. Veterans of Company C felt so strongly about the 21-year-old airman’s heroism that they–along with his former Air Force colleagues, his high school classmates and his hometown chamber of commerce–worked for more than three decades to see that he finally received, posthumously, the nation’s highest award for valor. On December 8, 2000, Pitsenbarger’s father was presented with his son’s Medal of Honor by then Air Force Secretary Whit Peters in a ceremony at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Looking on were 10 of the Army veterans whose eyewitness testimonials had persuaded the Pentagon and Congress to approve the award Pitsenbarger should have received in 1966. Also present were several of his school classmates and some of his Air Force friends, all of whom had worked to get him the medal. Of the December Medal of Honor ceremony, Bob Ford said, ‘It was a very sad thing, but a happy sad.’ Pitsenbarger was the first Air Force enlisted man to earn the Medal of Honor since the U.S. Air Force was established as a separate service in 1947. In 1945, in the era of the U.S. Army Air Forces, a Boeing B-29 Superfortress crewman, Henry Erwin, was awarded the medal for saving his crew and aircraft on a bombing run over Japan. One other Air Force enlisted man received the medal for heroism in Vietnam. John Levitow, an Air Force load master in Vietnam, earned the medalin 1969, three years after Pitsenbarger was killed in the action for which he was posthumously awarded the medal 35 years later. Levitow himself campaigned for Pitsenbarger’s medal and contended that the deceased airman should be considered the first Air Force enlisted recipient in Vietnam. Levitow died exactly one month before Frank Pitsenbarger was presented with his son’s Medal of Honor. The Medal of Honor ceremony in Dayton was emotional for all who attended. ‘There wasn’t a dry eye in the house,’ said Cheryl Buecker, who went to Piqua Central High School with Pitsenbarger in the class of 1962. ‘I was proud the community helped accomplish this,’ she added. It was only after the ceremony that details of his courage were made public. Toward that end, W. Parker Hayes, Jr., a historian with the Air Force Sergeants Association, had tracked down the Army veterans who had served with Pitsenbarger. Hayes said that in the 1990s an array of people had approached the association seeking help in honoring Pitsenbarger, including O’Beirne; Salem; Dale L. Potter, of Enterprise, Ore., a chopper pilot who also flew rescue operations with Pitsenbarger; Paul D. Miller, another pararescue specialist; some Piqua residents; and members of the Piqua Chamber of Commerce. All had wondered for years why the Medal of Honor had not been awarded to Pitsenbarger. Buecker and classmate Bob Ford said they had begun talking about the issue 20 years earlier at a class reunion planning meeting. ‘We’re a really tight class,’ said Buecker, noting that they held a reunion every five years and always put up a ‘memory board’ carrying obituaries of classmates, along with news clippings and letters from living classmates who could not attend the reunion. ‘At each reunion it seemed like there was something new about Bill to go on the board,’ Buecker added. In fact, more than a dozen military facilities around the world have been named for Pitsenbarger since his death. In the early 1990s, the classmates started a campaign to convince the Pentagon he deserved the medal. They talked to aides of their congressmen and wrote letters, but did not get very far until 1996. Then they, along with the chamber of commerce and some Air Force pararescuemen, joined forces with Hayes and his fellow historian, William I. Chivalette, at the Airmen’s Memorial Museum, operated by the Air Force Sergeants Association, near Washington, D.C. Hayes and Chivalette did exhaustive research on Pitsenbarger’s last mission. Hayes collected statements from the Army veterans in 1998 and 1999, and a medal nomination package was sent to the Pentagon. On October 6, 2000, Congress approved a bill that included awarding the Medal of Honor to Pitsenbarger. The 1962 class of Piqua Central High School had also felt it was a shame that his hometown had never honored him. In 1992, Cheryl Buecker and her husband Tom, who was president of the 1962 class, persuaded David Vollette, president of the Piqua Chamber of Commerce, to join their effort. In 1993 they got the town government to change the name of Piqua’s 67-acre Eisenhower Park to the Pitsenbarger Sports Complex, with a granite monument and bronze plaque, paid for in part by donations from ’62 classmates. ‘We had a deep desire as a community to see something happen. We knew [Pitsenbarger’s] father was hurt that he didn’t get the medal,’ said Cheryl Buecker. Tom Buecker said that in 1991 he had discussed the medal with aides of the area’s U.S. congressman, Representative John A. Boehner, but nothing much had developed from it. The Bueckers said they did not know the process or what was needed in Washington, or even if it was possible for someone to receive the Medal of Honor after so many years. In 1996, Chivalette went to Piqua to gather material to write a monograph on Pitsenbar-ger. During his visit, high school classmates and chamber of commerce members mentioned their efforts for a Piqua memorial and the Medal of Honor, and the Bueckers discussed the process with him. In writing his monograph, Chivalette be-came convinced Pitsenbarger deserved the medal. He researched the case until early 1998, when he turned it over to Hayes, since he was leaving for a new job with the Air Force Enlisted Heritage Hall in Alabama. Meanwhile, the Sergeants Association had been separately contacted in the spring of 1998 by Air Force pararescuer Paul Miller, who also sought help in trying to obtain the medal for Pitsenbarger. The Airmen’s Memorial Museum assembled a nomination package, with helicopter pilot Harold Salem signing the recommendation. Retired Maj. Gen. Allison C. Brooks of Sequim, Wash., who was in charge of Air Force rescue units in Vietnam in 1966, provided an endorsement, and Representative Boehner recommended approval of the medal and sent the package to Secretary Peters. On April 7, 2001, Piqua held a community celebration of Pitsenbarger’s life and heroism, marked by the unveiling of a replica of an Ohio historical marker. There also was a fund-raising dinner for the William H. Pitsenbarger Scholarship Fund, established in 1992 by his father and his late mother, Irene. There is now talk of putting up a statue of Pitsenbarger in the town square. For his father, friends, classmates and the town of Piqua, the ceremonies helped bring what seemed to be a fitting end to an almost forgotten episode of the Vietnam War. ‘It brought closure for me, and I think for the whole town,’ said his father. The article was written by Lacy Dean McCrary and originally published in the June 2002 issue of Vietnam Magazine. For more great articles be sure to subscribe to Vietnam Magazine today!   The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1963 has awarded in the name of the Congress the Medal of Honor posthumously to: A1C WILLIAM H. PITSENBARGER UNITED STATES AIR FORCE for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty near Cam My, April 11, 1966: Rank and organization: Airman First Class, U.S. Air Force, Detachment 6, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, Bien Hoa Air Base, Republic of Vietnam. Place and date: Near Cam My, April 11, 1966 Entered service at: Piqua, Ohio Born: July 8, 1944, Piqua, Ohio Citation:   Airman First Class Pitsenbarger distinguished himself by extreme valor on April 11, 1966 near Cam My, Republic of Vietnam, while assigned as a Pararescue Crew Member, Detachment 6, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron. On that date, Airman Pitsenbarger was aboard a rescue helicopter responding to a call for evacuation of casualties incurred in an on-going firefight between elements of the United States Army's 1st Infantry Division and a sizable enemy force approximately 35 miles east of Saigon. With complete disregard for personal safety, Airman Pitsenbarger volunteered to ride a hoist more than one hundred feet through the jungle, to the ground. On the ground, he organized and coordinated rescue efforts, cared for the wounded, prepared casualties for evacuation, and insured that the recovery operation continued in a smooth and orderly fashion. Through his personal efforts, the evacuation of the wounded was greatly expedited. As each of the nine casualties evacuated that day were recovered, Pitsenbarger refused evacuation in order to get one more wounded soldier to safety. After several pick-ups, one of the two rescue helicopters involved in the evacuation was struck by heavy enemy ground fire and was forced to leave the scene for an emergency landing. Airman Pitsenbarger stayed behind, on the ground, to perform medical duties. Shortly thereafter, the area came under sniper and mortar fire. During a subsequent attempt to evacuate the site, American forces came under heavy assault by a large Viet Cong force. When the enemy launched the assault, the evacuation was called off and Airman Pitsenbarger took up arms with the besieged infantrymen. He courageously resisted the enemy, braving intense gunfire to gather and distribute vital ammunition to American defenders. As the battle raged on, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to care for the wounded, pull them out of the line of fire, and return fire whenever he could, during which time, he was wounded three times. Despite his wounds, he valiantly fought on, simultaneously treating as many wounded as possible. In the vicious fighting which followed, the American forces suffered 80 percent casualties as their perimeter was breached, and airman Pitsenbarger was finally fatally wounded. Airman Pitsenbarger exposed himself to almost certain death by staying on the ground, and perished while saving the lives of wounded infantrymen. His bravery and determination exemplify the highest professional standards and traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Air Force
    1 point
  37. I think this means your are normal.  Some of us are approaching the cranky old curmudgeon stage.   Would you prefer this updated Ice Cream Music?   https://youtu.be/jgh10of6DKA   http://<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jgh10of6DKA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    1 point
  38. No.! It is not. Gets on my nerves as well. You'd think just once in a while the music could be changed.
    1 point
  39. we are in need for more men like this.  take a look around your local college and you will cry.  there are no more men to be found.  we have made a generation of babies where words written in chalk on a side walk puts them into crying laying down fear.   
    1 point
  40. Since they want a bill with a woman on it, which would be an oddity, maybe they should create an odd numbered bill for her...........$75??  :cool:
    1 point
  41.   How is Hamilton not a "Founding Father", since he helped draft and signed the original Constitution?   - OS
    1 point
  42. Don't know anything about the weapon but the way your thread title showed up on the main page made me laugh...Need help dating and gettin..... :D
    1 point
  43.   Double shoulder holster like Ice-T wears on Law and Order. It is Downtown Memphis after all.
    1 point
  44.     The term itself aside, ATF considers any purchase from FFL where a person gives you the money up front to buy it for him illegal, whether that person can legally own firearms or not.   See 4473 for specific example between legal "gift" and illegal purchase for someone else.   Note that this recently went all the way to SCOTUS at least regarding lying on the 4473 (the cop who bought a firearm for his brother in another state, even though it was transferred in that other state through a FFL).   - OS
    1 point
  45. She has four kids and none of them could figure out it was just the battery?
    1 point
  46. If you could edit the dudes out it'd be a lot cooler, otherwise, I approve this video.
    1 point
  47. I'm running a PSA build and I came in under $600 less sights and including two mags. This was a straight pistol build which could have been sbr'd for the same price. I have had no issue with it. I have upgraded it since the initial build with some accessories. It was a Colt pattern build.
    1 point
  48. Just fixed my problem , my new .22 is complete....
    1 point
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